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2nd Generation Acura NSX Reviews

 
Old 01-13-2015, 07:02 AM
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Old 01-13-2015, 12:32 PM
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Old 01-15-2015, 06:24 AM
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The road to supercar stardom is littered with missteps. For every slam-dunk like the McLaren F1 and Ferrari F40, there are contenders that never quite reach their full potential – think Mercedes-Benz SLR McLaren and Jaguar XJ220. Fear of building a mediocre halo car is why automakers take costly detours like reverse-engineering a carbon fiber chassis when aluminum just won't do (we're looking at you, Lexus LFA), and it's often those 2nd, 3rd, and even 4th major redirects that can make the difference between has-been and hero.

History has been kind to the late, great Acura NSX. Though its final years saw it lagging in power, ballooning in price and burdened by unsightly bubble headlamps, the NSX went to pasture in 2005 with a reputation for being an innovative, driver-focused ride that also happened to be practical enough for daily use. Despite its lofty aspirations and attainable price point, fifteen years of production saw just under 9,000 NSXs on the road, which begs the inevitable question: was Acura's mid-engine top dog too tame to be great, yet too ubiquitous to be exotic? Considering how the NSX redux has been worked (and re-worked as a stillborn front-engine V10 GT, only to return to a mid-engine layout), it's safe to say Acura is intent on securing supercar greatness.

While the essential spirit of the original NSX program targeted the "New Sports Experimental" idea, Large Project Leader Ted Klaus says that Shigeru Uehara, the man responsible for the original NSX (and Honda S2000, among others) advised the US-based development team that they ought to be "... open-minded to doing things for the emotional benefit of the customer," and not come from a place that was "hyper rational." In other words, build a car that makes the heart skip a beat.


As such, the next-generation NSX has departed from the 2013 concept and assumed a more emotional, expressive design language that hides a more engineering-intensive drivetrain. Gone is the naturally aspirated, transverse-mounted V6, replaced with a longitudinally mounted, turbocharged, dry-sump V6 that produces "north of 550 horsepower," according to Acura brass. As before, the internal combustion mill works with three electric motors to deliver power to all 4 wheels. Super Handling All-Wheel Drive, indeed – or, as Acura refers to it in this application, Sport Hybrid Super Handling All-Wheel Drive.

Why the shift? For starters, the enthusiast fringe wasn't entirely trustful of hybrid-enhanced performance when the 2013 NSX concept was unveiled, a skepticism no doubt fueled by the reality that whiz-bang hybrid hypercars like the Ferrari LaFerrari, Porsche 918 Spyder, and McLaren P1 had yet to prove their mettle in the real world.

Since the 2013 concept car, the final model has grown in size: the new NSX is an inch wider, 0.6 inches taller and 0.8 inches longer in wheelbase, while overall length has been stretched 3.1 inches. The twin-turbocharged V6's hybrid assistance comes from 2 motors up front (for torque vectoring), and a direct-drive unit at the rear. Accommodating the NSX's immense capacity for heat generation are no fewer than 10 cooling units: 3 for the engine, 2 for the intercoolers and nine-speed dual-clutch transmission, and single units for the twin electric motors and power distribution unit. The production model's dramatic looks are attributable to its more cab-forward design, not to mention the addition of numerous inlets, scoops, and spoilers, and more deeply sculpted body panels with a floating C-pillar, à la BMW i8.


The move from flush surfaces to aero effects came from what Exterior Design Project leader Michelle Christensen calls a "dance [of air] around the car," which recalls a domino effect initiated by the need for greater cooling from the addition of turbos. The hood vents were relocated and grew to roughly triple their original size, which in turn necessitated other changes, since the more air enters the vehicle, the more that air also needs to exit. Because inlets and vents often upset the flow of air, further elements were needed to redirect windflow and ensure that lift/downforce points are optimized, creating a sort of ripple effect on surface treatments. Suffice it to say, the new aerodynamic elements have been implemented to serve 2 masters: systems cooling and the creation of downforce.

If you were to follow the hypothetical path of a single molecule of air from the NSX's nose to its tail, that molecule has the potential to take a rather circuitous trajectory. It might enter the front radiator, pass through the brakes for cooling, exit again through the fender vents only to re-enter the side vents to the intake and intercoolers, or possibly pass through the flying buttress, creating downforce as it passes over the rear-deck surface. That's a whole lot of detours along the way. Perhaps in an effort to maintain a thorough line of design, several chrome surrounds and ornamental elements have been ditched in the redesign process. "We wanted to keep that initial theme," says Christensen, "but once we realized it wasn't working, we said if it's not functional, let's delete it. We simplified many areas," she adds, "and I think it actually helped mature the design."

Deep beneath the NSX's skin, a multi-material, aluminum-intensive chassis incorporates a 1st-ever casting process that manages to deliver the strength and ductility characteristics of a forged metal. Details are scarce on exactly how Honda achieved that balance, but the manufacturer claims there will be 100 specialists within their Marysville, OH plant focused on this particular area of expertise when NSX production starts there in the fall of 2015. Carbon-fiber flooring helps provide a strong structural backbone that isn't required to support impulsive crash loads, and a 1st-of-its-kind 3D formed ultra-high-strength steel A-pillar enables thin construction to help maximize outward visibility. All-aluminum independent front and rear suspension will be aided by brake torque vectoring, and both the steering and braking systems will be electric, the latter incorporating carbon ceramic units in the form of 6-piston front and 4-piston rear Brembos.


Despite the NSX's drivetrain complexity, myriad electronics systems and high concept ambitions, its interior layout is relatively simple – and very Acura. Front and center is a large tachometer, Porsche 911-style. 4 drive modes are available – Quiet (EV-only), Sport, Sport+, and Track – with the default setting being Sport. Each mode manages the drivetrain's response settings, torque vectoring characteristics, chassis settings and engine sound. The mode is set via a large, round knob surrounding a red anodized "Power" (start) button. Predictably, a Launch mode offers maximum acceleration. Aft of the mode dial are P, N, and D transmission modes, in addition to the obligatory wheel-mounted paddle shifters.

Despite its relatively conservative interior treatment, the cabin does have subtle details that point to the NSX's uniqueness, namely the multifunction TFT display and the instrument panel frame, a structural element visible around the nav screen and along the passenger side of the dashboard. The stretch of aluminum is artfully sandwiched between an Alcantara lower piece and a leather-wrapped upper section and finished in a tasteful satin texture with delicately radiused edges. As with the original NSX, a premium has been placed on outward visibility along with the ergonomics unique to high performance driving, as evidenced by the console padding where your leg might brace itself during hard cornering. Interior Design Project Leader John Norman recalls outstanding visibility as a big part of the NSX experience. "It was like the invisible car," he says of the original, "You're driving the car and then it just – it goes away, and it's just you and the road. We realized that that was just incredibly vital. If this was going to be an NSX," he says, "it had to have that feeling."


The NSX is estimated to start at around $150,000. Considering key benchmark vehicles include competition like the Audi R8 V10, Ferrari 458 Italia and Porsche 911 Turbo, if it performs well, it's safe to say the NSX will be something of a value proposition when customer orders are accepted in summer of this year.

Though it packs tantalizing technology and an ambitious all-wheel drive hybrid powertrain beneath its late-breaking dramatic looks, Acura is withholding a number of key specifications including engine output, curb weight and drag coefficient until further notice. "Because it's a hybrid," Klaus reasons, "[those numbers] could be easily misunderstood."

Despite the coy aversion to spec sheets and bottom-line numbers, what we've seen of the NSX so far indicates Acura has gone to great lengths to respect – and in many ways redefine – the qualities that made its forbearer 1 of the greats. By refining its clarity of vision and redirecting efforts to make the NSX even better than originally intended, Acura hopes its new supercar will be every bit as exceptional on roads and racetracks as it seems on paper.


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Old 01-16-2015, 06:41 AM
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When we introduced you to the 2016 Acura NSX yesterday, we weren't extremely complimentary to the interior. We should have been, and that's because it's all sorts of terrific. Here's why.


The problem with cars these days is bloat. On the interior, that bloat doesn't take the form of unnecessary weight or size, it takes the form of buttons, big a-pillars, confusing systems, and compromised sight lines.

In fact, giganto a-pillars are one of the biggest issues that new cars have, especially high performance cars that are expected to be used on a race track. That's the NSX. Acura says they took a lot of pride in making the a-pillars as thin as they could in order to provide great sight lines.


And they actually did. Sitting in the NSX, you can see easily out of each corner, unlike a lot of cars on the market today. It's sad that being able to see clearly out of the front of a car is a big selling point, but this is actually true.


The interior itself is very minimalist. There are barely any buttons, with most of the controls you need for the radio and phone confined to the steering wheel. There's an infotainment screen and climate controls which sit just above a large rotary dial (which is not for the radio) and the start button. That rotary dial is actually used to select the drive modes of the car. It also has a push button shift like in the new TLX. I'm ok with that too.


Those are the only real flourishes. The seats are comfortable and tight, though I didn't really go around any corners so I can't tell you how the bolstering is. The instrument binnacle is kept as low as possible to keep open sightlines. Acura will not be offering a heads up display, so you'll have to focus on the display alone, which was not on when I was in the car.


What was on was the steering wheel (it better be, most cars need steering wheels). It's really great. The contours fit your hand perfectly, especially at 10 and 3. It's thicker there and has a pistol grip feel. It's incredibly natural to hold. 212223

We've given Acura a lot of shit for nearly every single product decision they've made in the last decade or so. However, it's clear that they've taken getting the NSX right very, very seriously. I'm not willing to eat total skepticism crow yet, but I cannot wait to drive this car.


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Old 01-16-2015, 05:39 PM
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Dan Neil of the WSJ...

Rumble Seat
Five Big Hits at the Detroit Auto Show
Dan Neil reflects on the big winners at the North American International Auto Show in Detroit.

By
Dan Neil
Jan. 16, 2015 3:53 p.m. ET


Even Dan Neil has good things to say about the NSX. He has not typically liked Acura's recent offerings, paritcularily not the RLX..


Acura NSX

Another sports-car legend reborn, the Acura NSX is a curious species, an ultrarefined and stylistically restrained, even modest, midengine exotic sewn into a gorgeous aluminum and carbon tunic. Yes, the NSX’s stance and proportions are slinky and alluring—not overt—where the Ford GT is the Whore of Babylon.

It’s been a quarter-century since the first NSX challenged the Italians at the mid-engine exotic game, and that first car was insane. Its most enduring quality was the seating position, with the foot box out in the nose of the car, and the fenders falling away from view, giving the driver a nosecone’s view of the road. The new car, obliged to have quite a bit more structure up front to meet crash standards, can’t deliver that panoramic forward view, with a small, darty-feeling steering wheel between your knees. But the new NSX does look extremely fast.
Advertisement

The working bits are these: An aluminum-intensive space frame and body panels; a mid-mounted 3.0-liter twin-turbo V6; a nine-speed dual-clutch transaxle; and—this is important —three powerful electric motors, one between the engine and gearbox and two more sending power to the front wheels, working independently to provide what’s called torque vectoring. The NSX will be able to carry more speed into and out of a corner because the system can send more power to the outside-front wheel. Acura isn’t quoting specific horsepower figures yet, only saying net system power will be more than 550 hp.

I’ve driven one car that had this kind of fully independent, electric torque vectoring/steering, and that was Porsche works’ GT3 Hybrid race car. It just about tore my head off.

So here is my prediction: One fine day this summer, in the fairest of circumstances, the NSX will put up a Nurburgring lap time faster than the instant-legend Ford GT. I’ve already made a gentlemanly bet on it.

One other fact about the NSX: It will be built in Ohio. Go Buckey
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Old 01-17-2015, 10:23 AM
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Old 02-14-2015, 06:35 PM
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I'm loving it!
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Old 05-14-2015, 02:52 PM
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Wink Not a Review but ...

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Old 07-17-2015, 05:02 PM
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Exclamation Vids

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Old 07-17-2015, 09:04 PM
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You can hear the high pitch whining of the electric motors, at the end of the vid. I guess its the regenerative braking. Nice launch anyways... not GTR "quality" but close.
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Old 07-20-2015, 09:03 PM
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Sweet baby Jesus I want that in my driveway. That sounds hot!
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Old 08-05-2015, 06:43 AM
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Wink Spied


The brand new Acura NSX is finally on the way and our spy photographers have caught it testing in production form, meaning it’s completely camo-free.


This mid-engined Japanese sports car has a twin turbo V6, a hybrid gas-electric powertrain, and is expected to make more than 500 hp. You can see that high-tech heart through the rear window. All that power will hit the road through a new super-handling all-wheel drive system, which is paired to a 9-speed dual-clutch transmission.


The NSX uses a number of high-tech and advanced materials to keep weight down including aluminum and carbon fiber.


These spy photos show off the bright red paint finish of the new NSX and a number of cool carbon fiber trim pieces. You can spot it on the front and rear bumpers, spoiler and some trim bits on the wheels.


This has to be the final look at the car before the production version finally hits showrooms, so take it in and get ready to see the real deal soon. The NSX will be manufactured in Marysville, Ohio.

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Old 08-09-2015, 04:37 PM
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The sign is already up in Marysville, OH...."Home of the Acura NSX"

Anxious for these to start rolling off the assembly line and onto the streets!
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Old 10-26-2015, 07:15 AM
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A bit more info about the NSX... not too stellar review.

2017 Acura NSX - First Drive
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Old 10-26-2015, 11:53 AM
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The 2017 Acura NSX is heavy. It outweighs the original 1990 car by more than 800 pounds and is over 300 heavier than a Chevrolet Corvette Z06. The NSX is insanely complicated, with an assist motor between the twin-turbo V6 and the 9-speed dual-clutch transmission, plus two torque-vectoring electric motors at the front axle. And the NSX is expensive. It will probably cost $170,000 when it goes on sale in Spring 2016. Commence trolling.

If you hadn't guessed, the new NSX isn't much like the 1st generation built from 1990 to 2005. But the 2 cars share a common philosophy. Both are Acura's interpretation of what a modern, everyday supercar should be. Based on the new car, things have changed a lot in the last 25 years.

For project leader Ted Klaus, the original NSX was 1 reason he started working at Honda. At the 1990 Detroit Auto Show, "I sat watching that car for a while. A really long while. Even just looking at that car I could see the deep, advanced, functional beauty." The most difficult thing with the new NSX, says Klaus, is to explain how a heavier and more complicated car can outperform other cars in a way that feels like traditional lightweighting.

The NSX has a giant bag of neat tricks, but to understand them takes a lengthy explanation that starts with the Sport Hybrid SH-AWD powertrain. Behind the cockpit is a 75-degree, twin-turbocharged, 3.5-liter V6, made specifically for the NSX. On its own it puts out 500 horsepower and 406 pound-feet of torque. The rest of Honda's lineup uses a 60-degree layout, but the wider angle here lowers the center of gravity. Behind the engine is the rear assist motor, with 47 hp and 100 lb-ft. Hanging off the rear of that is the 9-speed dual-clutch, developed in-house.

In between the front wheels is the Twin Motor Unit (TMU), a pair of 36-hp, 54-lb-ft electric motors that add or subtract forces to their respective sides. The Power Drive unit manages the electronics, and sits in the center spine of the car like a traditional prop shaft. A lithium-ion battery pack is behind the pair of seats, on the cold side of the firewall. Total system output is 573 hp and 476 lb-ft.

This is not the way the NSX was supposed to be at 1st. The original plan was a transverse-mounted, naturally aspirated engine just like the 1st car. About 6 months into the project, the decision was made to switch to the longitudinal turbo motor. The engine change presented a mess of problems. Time was short, so powertrain development went on in Japan while the Ohio-based engineering team worked out the chassis and structure. In other words, they had to work out the cooling and packaging while the cooling and packaging needs were still up in the air. "We were sent back to the drawing board more than once," said Klaus.


The body is mostly aluminum, with carbon fiber in the roof and part of the floor. Steel stampings surround parts of the windshield and span across the roof. High-strength steel reinforces the roof rail, extending from the base of the windshield to the B-pillar. It's done in a 3-dimensional curve that's formed by a robot that twists the beam into shape during the extrusion process.

One of the most incredible parts of the NSX is the crash structure, which uses a technique Acura calls ablation casting. It goes like this: molten aluminum is poured into a sand mold, which is then hosed off while the metal is still liquid. Somehow, the metal sets before collapsing like a failed soufflé. The rapid cooling makes for high elasticity and energy absorption.

So how's it all come together? At our preview drive in San Francisco and points north, we kept thinking that this really is the Honda of supercars. Ablation casting, and stories like how the air channels leading out of the front tire well increased airflow to the intercoolers by more than 65%, speak to the company's reputation for inventiveness.



We're fans of the styling. It has high points, like the wide side mirrors sitting on thin stalks, but the new NSX lacks an iconoclastic shape like the original. This too is representative of Acura, a company with a lineup of understyled cars that drive well. Even parked, the NSX stirs far more emotions than any of its siblings, but it doesn't raise your pulse in the same way that staring at a Ferrari does.

According to Acura, this is by design. The NSX is meant to be the everyday supercar. It's a car that has the lowest center of gravity in its class but still manages the same ground clearance as a standard Porsche 911 Carrera. Compared to an Audi R8 or a Ferrari 458 Italia (two of the NSX's benchmarks), the Acura is both more reserved and more responsive. This spectrum of the car's behavior is controlled by the dynamic mode selector in the center console. The most docile setting is called Quiet, which keeps engine revs below 4,000 rpm, closes off the active exhaust and engine intake sound pipe, and uses electric power as much as possible. The default mode is Sport, which keeps the start-stop function but allows for more revs and pipes more sound into the cabin and through the rear. Sport+ is 1 click to the right, and gives the most aggressive throttle and steering response, firms up the magnetorheological shocks, and adjusts the front motors for more agility. Hold the dial to the right from there and you get Track mode, which also unlocks launch control. (0-60 happens in about 3.0 seconds, but Klaus says that number is "an outcome, not a goal.") Some of the inputs are smoothed out in this mode for a more consistent feel, while the stability control loosens up to the highest threshold short of full deactivation.

Acura expects Quiet mode to be used about 3% of the time. It's meant for a socially considerate arrival and departure. We disagree, as it's also the eco mode. We saw 26 miles per gallon on the trip computer trundling along in traffic on Highway 1 north of San Francisco. Quiet mode also prompted 1 dreadlocked northern Californian driving a rusted out 4Runner to ask if the car was electric. "Uh, no, it's a hybrid," we said. "Cool man," he replied, right before cutting in front of us as the light turned green.

Sport mode lacks the exhilaration you expect from a near-600-hp supercar. It's more like MDX mode. The transmission is quick to grab high gears and there's little sense of excitement. Sport+ and Track are the settings for any fun, with the difference depending on how much of a safety net you want.



Before we wander off into a dark corner discussing the 15 different attributes adjusted by the four NSX drive modes, let's get front and center with one thing: the NSX is fast. Like, stupid fast. The kind of fast that makes you giggle every time you hit the gas. The kind of fast that makes you think about how the walls at Sonoma Raceway are way, way too close to the track.

And dang, the NSX is comfortable. The low floor and long doors make getting in and out slightly gymnastic, but otherwise the interior is hitting the easy button. The seat padding is perfect, and a mere 4 ways to adjust means you can find the perfect driving position easily. A manual-adjust seat will also be available. If there's one knock to the interior, it's that there's little storage, and most of it is hard to access while driving. That too is probably on purpose. The NSX is not a car for taking selfies while you drive, although the standard navigation radio (the same infuriating dial-free system used across the Honda lineup) features Android Auto and Apple CarPlay.

So back to those neat tricks. There are 2 big ones with the NSX. The 1st is the brakes, which feel like conventional brakes but are actually brake-by-wire (the system defaults to a conventional hydraulic system as a failsafe, as required by the Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standards). The feel comes from a hydraulic feedback mechanism, which portions out pedal stiffness relative to the rate of deceleration. On the other end, a series of valves balances pressure on the friction brakes based on the level of regeneration braking from the TMU and the driver's pedal input. Had you driven the NSX and never read this paragraph, you'd never guess it was a hybrid system. The brakes are that good.

The NSX's 2nd trick is seamless shifts. No bumps, no head bobbing, nothing. The only clue you have is the change in engine tone. On the track, 9 speeds are a lot to manage. We checked the speed of the paddle shifts a few times and, finding it satisfactory, let the computer make most of the decisions – a job it does with near perfection. The NSX shifts so smoothly because the TMU kicks in extra thrust during the few milliseconds between gears.


The TMU is also what makes the NSX nimble at low speeds and stable when going fast. Acura engineers fitted the car with a quick-ratio steering rack because it uses the TMU to slightly counteract steering inputs and smooth out response at high speeds. Like the brakes, you'd never know unless someone told you.

Like a fly-by-wire fighter jet that needs the computer to maintain stable flight, the NSX uses the electronics to pull off feats of handling that are otherwise impossible. In Sport mode, the car exhibits a soft, friendly understeer. Move to Track mode, and that understeer all but disappears. Klaus says the understeer is baked into the chassis setup, but the SH-AWD can work to make the car behave neutrally.

Are there compromises? Oh yes. For one, you don't get any steering feedback through the wheel. On our final session around Sonoma Raceway we adjusted to picking up the car's state of grip through our hips. This is not a car that speaks in the traditional sense, and many people will have a problem with that. On the other hand, the NSX can do things other cars can't, like cut around a hairpin at speeds that leave other cars plowing in a straight line.

Klaus and his team are open about why they made each decision with the car. On our test drive, our car started with the standard Continental ContiSport Contact 5P for the road drive and our 1st 2 lapping sessions. After lunch we switched to Michelin Pilot Sport Cup 2s, which are clearly better suited for track abuse. But Acura wanted us to try both tires even though the Contis fall off after a few laps. That kind of honesty is uncommon on press introductions.

The NSX is fast, comfortable, and obeys your every command. And 1 thing is certain here: Acura didn't copy anyone. The NSX a unique supercar, from the way it approaches performance to how it goes down the road. And in that sense, it's a true successor to the original.

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Old 10-26-2015, 03:33 PM
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^^^^^^
While I would never compare the NSX to the RLX Sport Hybrid, the unique feel described in this review of the NSX also could be used to describe the RLX that I drive. I understand the comments about not feeling like a super car but still is "stupid fast". I think we are all going to get used to having a different "feel" to sport car driving as more electric and performance hybrids come to market.

All in all it sounds like a car I might buy if I wanted to invest $170k in a fun weekend ride. While I could probably do that, I am not inclined to put that kind of money into a "second car", albeit a great one.
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Old 10-27-2015, 07:31 AM
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Now that the embargo has been lifted, there is a flood of reviews out there. Here is a summary of the major automotive publications:

Road & Track: Brake by-wire good, transmission not as good as the Porsche PDK, heavy and not optimal weight distribution, needs Michelin Pilot Sport Cups. But... "but I'm told the machine can pants a 911 Turbo in the sixty sprint. I believe it. Launch Control is a wonder. There's zero wheel spin and exactly no hesitation, just a relentless press for the speedometer's upper octaves."

Autocar: 75 degree bank angle (unlike the usual 60o Honda v6 engines), too quiet, needs more drama. But... "Future versions, including a rumored roadster and Type R, will change that, hopefully. Meanwhile, Honda, welcome back to the fight."

Car and Driver: Needs the Michelin tires, not the Continentals. understeer tuned in for safety. But... "Someday, this stuff will be in a Civic, but for now at least, the price tag has slid under $200,000"

Autoblog: Not a traditional NSX, but a modern interpretation of it. But... "Sport mode lacks the exhilaration you expect from a near-600-hp supercar. It's more like MDX mode"

Automotive News: Heavy, nice daily driver, gem of a transmission. But... "tension between the Americans leading the project who wanted more visceral thrills and their coworkers back in Japan who wanted rationality"

Link: https://www.carthrottle.com/post/fir...-nsx-are-here/
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Old 10-27-2015, 11:04 AM
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What Is It? 2017 Acura NSX, the Japanese manufacturer’s long-awaited mid-engine 2-seat flagship.

Starting Price: $150,000 (Estimated)

Competitors: Audi R8 V10, Mercedes-AMG GT-S, Porsche 911 Turbo

Alternatives: McLaren 570S, Lamborghini Huracan

Pros: Digital drivetrain works seamlessly and cohesively; even quicker than it feels; comfy enough for daily use.

Cons: Could use more fierceness and feedback; hefty (and well out of supercar range) at 3,802 pounds; that nagging feeling that nice supercars never finish first.

Would I Buy It With My Own Money? Not quite yet, though this might be more my speed in a couple decades when I’ve had it with hardcore sports cars.

The year was 1990 and the supercar future looked bright. While feisty exotics like Ferraris and Lamborghinis ruled the road, a new contender from Japan threatened to turn the supercar microcosm on its ear with fresh styling, an approachable price, and surprising everyday usability. That outsider was the 1st generation Acura NSX, and its finely tuned approach delivered a stylish value proposition that was nothing short of revolutionary in its day.

The mid-engine contender eventually retired after a 15-year reign, resurfacing like a phoenix in 2015 as the all-new 2017 Acura NSX. During its 1st go, the NSX challenged a tiny coterie of 6-figure cars that barely crested the 300 horsepower mark. Nowadays, the upper end of the market is led by near-1,000 horsepower hypercars, while back on planet Earth, many 500-horsepower beasts can be had for under $100,000.


How did Acura challenge the modern day supercar conundrum? For starters, they clad their new flagship with an arsenal of mil-spec technological hardware. The car begins from a transversely mounted, turbocharged 3.5-liter V-6 (an engine shared by no other Honda product), married to an electric motor at the crankshaft, all of which drives the rear wheels. Up front, twin electric motors fed by a lithium-ion battery pack spin the front wheels. Togehter, the system makes 573 hp, with 500 of those equines coming from the twin-turbo V6, while cumulative torque totals 405 lb-ft.

Below the surface, the NSX grows complex fast. Take cooling; there’s no fewer than 10 heat exchangers from 7 major heat sources ,including the internal combustion engine, their turbochargers, the 9-speed transmission and the battery and processors. Stopping duties are performed by carbon fiber brakes, and all 4 corners of the car pitch in to help it around corners: while the rear motor can brake torque, the front motors can push or pull on either side to help tuck the car in and tug it through a turn.


And then there’s the functional challenge of packaging all of those elements, many of which must work together cohesively to make the NSX feel, as Honda engineers call it, a “human-centric ergonomically enhanced design theme.” Among the countless tricks up their sleeve is an A-pillar that’s been “3D bent and quenched”— that is, heated, bent, and quickly cooled with jets of water, enabling narrower construction and better outward visibility. I could go on about the NSX’s novel engineering details and ambitious goals, but all this leads to the same question: How does it drive?


Climb inside the cockpit and the NSX feels every bit an Acura—natural, comfortable, and smartly ergonomic, with excellent outward visibility and front wheel humps positioned for easy apex placement. Though some clever surfacing and contouring lends a sense of flow to the cabin, there’s nothing terribly groundbreaking here; the space seems to dissolve around you, enabling the driver to focus on the comfortably squared-off steering wheel. The NSX fires up with a healthy cough from the twin-turbo V-6, and the dual-clutch switches smoothly into gear, while a large Dynamic Mode dial toggles through 4 settings—Quiet, Sport, Sport+, and Track. The modes control everything from throttle mapping and regenerative power patterns to brake pedal feel and suspension damping. For some perspective on the degrees of variability at play, there’s a 25-decibel difference between Quiet and Track—to steal from a certain ‘80s song, a whisper to a scream.

Though the NSX accelerates with eerie smoothness, it is also wickedly quick off the line, dispatching quick revs to its 7,500-RPM ceiling before the transmission seamlessly summons the next gear. Though it feels surprisingly undramatic, there’s a lot going on as the NSX hustles itself to speed: electric motors are handling the low end of the power delivery until the turbochargers kick in, at which point the EV propulsion is tapered off in exchange for good old fashioned internal combustion. Perform the launch control sequence, an easy 2-pedal sequence in Track mode, and the blast off is, once again, drama (and almost completely tire squeal) free. The result, however, is staggeringly quick; though Acura hasn’t disclosed an official 0 to 60 mph time, they do hint the NSX beats the Porsche 911 Turbo’s 3.0 second figure by a 10th of a click. Hot damn, Acura; who would’ve guessed you’re such a speed freak?


Depending on which mode you choose to tackle the track with, you’ll experience varying degrees of intervention and tightness. Predictably, there’s a bit of safety-inducing understeer in milder settings and more satisfaction to be found in Track, where the front tires seem to find the apex with not-so-predictable ease. You can credit the electronically managed torque vectoring magic for the NSX’s ability to turn and tuck-in when the throttle is lifted; after all, these 3,800 pounds aren’t going to turn themselves. Though it’s capable of impressive athletics for its curb weight, the NSX does so with surprisingly little kickback. There isn’t a whole lot of information funneled through the steering wheel, and the powertrain’s lack of peakiness makes for an undramatic ride. Even brake pedal feel is modulated to within an inch of its life; rather than a physical connection to the hydraulic reservoir, the NSX’s binders use drive-by-wire technology with a force feedback system that alters how the pedal responds based on drive mode and brake rotor temperature.

Though the automatic transmission is virtually flawless in the Track setting, telepathically holding gears and downshifting when necessary, tapping the paddle shifter unfortunately does not summon an upshift. Also, turning all systems off doesn’t completely remove the digital nannies; when I abruptly lifted off the throttle, the system kicked in to save my bacon. Despite the danger of driving without electronic aids, I would personally prefer a more permissive track mode and that rarest of touches, a real “off” switch for the babysitter.


Despite the near invisibility of all the electronic systems, the 2 tire choices offer significantly different levels of grip: the standard 4-season Continentals grease up and give up the ghost too early, leaving you cautious and leery on the track. The Michelin Pilot Sport Cup 2s, on the other hand, feel grippy and confidence inspiring, delivering dramatically more tenacious road holding.

A 2nd day of street driving on the winding roads between Calistoga and San Francisco put the NSX’s capabilities into a far more comprehensible, real world context. On the high-speed sweepers connecting California’s wine country to the Pacific, the NSX felt hunkered down and capable, rolling with the road’s punches and accelerating and braking with aplomb. Under these conditions the Acura comes across as more comfortable; not that it can’t hold its own on the track, it simply seems more in its element on the road. Despite the ducts, vents and flying buttresses, the NSX presents itself as a grand tourer rather than a wannabe racer, choosing to cosset its driver rather than transmit tangibles like road texture and bump steer to the passenger compartment.

Purists can (and most certainly will) crave more feedback from Acura’s new flagship. But until the inevitable R-Spec track special comes along, the NSX’s disposition will be dialed in for refinement, not raucousness. With an estimated starting price of around $150,000, the new NSX faces the likes of the Mercedes-AMG GT-S Coupe ($130,825), Porsche 911 Turbo ($151,100), and Audi R8 V10 ($153,900).

Unlike the 1st-generation’s underdog status, the new NSX’s position in the supercar world is a difficult 1 to gauge, given how entirely different it is. If you crave the saucy excitement of a track-focused superstar, you might be inclined to think of the NSX as a too-smooth, too-nice way of getting from A to B.

But if you’re the happy-go-lucky type, you might think of the NSX as a sort of poor man’s Porsche 918 Spyder, a technical tour de force that delivers a good chunk of the performance for a fraction of the cost. It’s too early to tell which side of history this Acura NSX will fall on, but the reincarnation offers a polished and refined take on the age-old supercar formula.

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Old 10-27-2015, 11:57 AM
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We've been waiting for the new 2017 Acura NSX so long, I was starting to worry I'd find it passé even before I drove it. It's been 3 years since Acura 1st showed off the NSX Concept, and only a little less than that since their abrupt about-face on the powertrain that turned what was shaping up to be a relatively mainstream sports car - albeit with an iconized nameplate - into a complex hybrid.

Full production and sales of the NSX aren't due to start until early in the new year, but when Honda offered me a sneak preview of the car in the run up to the Tokyo Motor Show 2015 this week, it seemed churlish to say no.


The good news - the really, really good news - is that the new NSX is not at all passé. The bad news is that I had very little time to experience the reality of that.

There is a limit to how much I can tell you from a couple of laps in a new car, but Honda sees this as whetting the appetite as it finesses the final software. The car's complex powertrain hardware is just about complete - 2 electric motors, one for each of the front wheels, and then a 3rd drive motor on the rear crankshaft, along with a 3.5L V6 engine for a total of 573 horsepower and around 476 lb-ft of torque - but there's polishing to be done before deliveries begin in roughly six months time.


Here, then, are the instant highlights. Honda promises "0 delay" acceleration, and the NSX delivers. There's an immediacy to when you stomp on the gas pedal that makes you suddenly realize most cars that fall on the combustion side rather than pure-EV have a split second of lag before the power kicks in.

I doubt most Lamborghini, Porsche, or Ferrari owners are going to lose sleep over it, but once you notice it that 1st time you can't forget quite how quickly the NSX is roused.


It does so with a roar not a whir, too. There may be 3 electric motors inside this thing, but they're easily out-grunted by the 3.5-liter gas engine that contributes the lion's share of power and torque. In keeping with Honda's "everyday supercar" goal it's not the wail or scream of its rawer rivals, though.

The four power sources work together smoothly, and it's hard to tell where electric starts and the turbocharged gas engine finishes. You don't miss the grip and the cornering, mind; even after just a few curves, the NSX's point-and-go attitude to curves is clear, even if feel through the wheel is oddly game-like and lacking in feedback.


I'm mighty curious to see how it handles some properly twisty stuff, because the SH-AWD system - now terminologically upgraded to "Sports Hybrid All Wheel Drive" and allowing torque to each of the front wheels to be independently controlled - already seems like it could be the NSX's true wildcard.

Then again, that might be the brakes. Usually it's the going-fast part of a supercar that takes your breath away, but the combination of traditional Brembos and using the electric motors as regenerative generators means the NSX sheds speed almost violently.


Regen braking only happened when I was in Sport mode, not Sport+, and you notice the difference. Lift your foot in the former and the motors automatically start to claw back some of that otherwise wasted energy, slowing the car rapidly. In Sport+ mode, meanwhile, the ride got flatter, the V6 is kept permanently engaged, and the whole thing gets more aggressive.

The NSX also has a Track mode and Quiet mode, neither of which I got a chance to try, but which promise to turn the car either into an upshift-phobic race monster or a demure, mostly-electric suburbanite.


I'd be lying, though, if I said I wasn't left with plenty of lingering questions. Aside from just how good the handling is, I'm curious about how the NSX's braking system holds up to continued use in performance situations, especially since the drive-by-wire system Honda opted for only delivers faux-feel through the pedal.

Meanwhile, Honda's promise that the new combo drive-by-wire and hydraulic system for each of the brakes can be tuned individually - meaning less aggressive bite in the city, but more eager on the track - is something which will take real-world experience to compare.


I'm also curious about the cabin design, too, which for the most part is solid - plenty of Alcantara on most of the touchy-feely trim parts - but is let down by unduly plasticky switchgear. The center stack lacks the metal-edged finesse of rivals in the segment, and key touch-points like the shifter paddles fall short of the crispness and quality feel you'd expect of a car with this pedigree.

It's a shame, because otherwise driving position feels good. Honda's big central display in the driver binnacle is clear and easy to follow even while on the move at rapid rates, visibility is astonishing for a low-slung supercar - rear view excepted - and the center console is pleasingly minimal on extraneous buttons, even if those which make the cut feel somewhat pedestrian as you stab or twist at them.


All the same, that seems a minor foible - easily addressed, too, were Honda to decide to - in the face of what's already shaping up to be an incredible car.

Thing is, "incredible" means different things to different people. Comparing the new NSX with its forebear seems almost pointless when it comes to all but the overall strategy of an supercar suited for everyday use.


In the ten years since the 1st NSX was officially retired, the performance car space has changed dramatically. Reliability - once a capacity that only Honda could really boast - is up across even many of the more outlandish models out there, while technology has encroached to the point where a big engine and a slick manual gearbox are frankly insufficient to compete.

It means Honda isn't the only company to be using electric motors to boost performance, or clever algorithm-swapping drive modes to suit freeway or track or suburban street. The new NSX pushes the state of gadgetry even further, and finds itself facing questions of the sort Audi did with its eminently-manageable R8, only writ much larger.


An incredible technological achievement, then. An incredible use of new and existing mechanical and electronic systems to make a car that can potentially keep up with a Lamborghini but also drive like a cosseting Acura. And, certainly, an incredibly divisive answer to what a proper supercar should be in an age when luxury sedans are setting 0-60 records and electrification is no longer laughable.

Personally, I'm reserving judgement until I can spend more time behind the wheel, but I can understand why some are worried the needle has ticked too far into the realms of rationality.


Over the course of a decade and a half, Honda sold around 18,000 of the original NSX. Many of its most ardent fans today have probably never even driven 1.

With an estimated price north of $150,000, the 2017 NSX is likely to prove equally exclusive, but the ripples of controversy its creation have prompted will be orders of magnitude greater.
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Old 10-27-2015, 12:26 PM
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Soo glad to see a press day finally. It's no longer vaporware! Well, almost. It just has to get into customers' hands now.

I wrote on the TOV yesterday:

So basically the NSX is an RLX Sport Hybrid with more aggressive styling, two turbos, two fewer seats, "brake by wire", an engine behind the ears, and 800 pounds less mass. That's about what I get from reading the reviews.

As a Sport Hybrid owner, that's not a bad thing. But then, I've been in a Sport Hybrid for a year now, and I get it: electrons=more thrust, not necessarily better fuel economy.

Most of the issues raised should be fixed with software and tires. I suspect most people who purchase/lease this car will opt for the Pilot Sport Cups rather than the Contis. I sure would.

The truth is, I think the Acura engineers, who are car guys after all, will take what criticisms the automotive press have given to heart. Unlike the handwringing over the rest of Acura, I think the NSX experiment will end quite well.

The question is, will the rest of Acura pay attention and improve on the rest of the lackluster lineup? Will Honda give Acura enough money to TRULY fly as a luxury company? Will the next RLX be a "no holds barred" hybrid super luxury car and will it come sooner than later? I will be staying tuned.

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Old 10-27-2015, 03:41 PM
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I was excited to see the article in Car & Driver this afternoon and I agree with you Bob in your assessment. I can't imagine how fantastic the NSX is to drive having been a Blackbird operator for almost exactly 10 months. I think the current levels of thrust are close to the limit of what is really usable in the RLX-SH for everyday driving as I rarely can give it 100% for more than a few seconds now, so adding even more power and removing hundreds of pounds of weight at the same time to me means that the NSX will only be usable for a few seconds of 100% thrust too, but just going even faster in the same time frame. I know I am being sensible here, but as the horsepower wars continue to thrive (as they did in the 60's), we are still contained by what can actually be used in everyday driving. Don't get me wrong, this is all very cool, but at some point don't we hit some level of diminished returns? If the NSX-R has 650 combined hp, will it be faster in any meaningful way out in the real world? Yes on a track or if someone was drag racing, but on the streets there are real limitations for your own safety and those around us. What do you think?
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Old 10-27-2015, 05:53 PM
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On the street, even a Civic is more than enough. When it comes to beating the guy next to you at the stop light, then perhaps something like a GT-R, 911, or new NSX is nearly at the limit.

With that said, I think there is a good number of people who can afford these cars actually go to track days. I was just at the Nurburgring a few weeks ago and there were tons of 911's, Ferraris, Lotus', M3's, etc. A lot of them were also right-hand-drive, meaning that they are from England. That to me suggests that some of these owners do travel around to visit different tracks and race their toys.
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Old 10-27-2015, 07:32 PM
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Originally Posted by RLX-Sport Hybrid View Post
I was excited to see the article in Car & Driver this afternoon and I agree with you Bob in your assessment. I can't imagine how fantastic the NSX is to drive having been a Blackbird operator for almost exactly 10 months. I think the current levels of thrust are close to the limit of what is really usable in the RLX-SH for everyday driving as I rarely can give it 100% for more than a few seconds now, so adding even more power and removing hundreds of pounds of weight at the same time to me means that the NSX will only be usable for a few seconds of 100% thrust too, but just going even faster in the same time frame. I know I am being sensible here, but as the horsepower wars continue to thrive (as they did in the 60's), we are still contained by what can actually be used in everyday driving. Don't get me wrong, this is all very cool, but at some point don't we hit some level of diminished returns? If the NSX-R has 650 combined hp, will it be faster in any meaningful way out in the real world? Yes on a track or if someone was drag racing, but on the streets there are real limitations for your own safety and those around us. What do you think?
There is a lot more to the NSX than it's 0-60 time. While i agree with your point that speed has diminishing returns, people who choose to lay down $150-170k for a car that isn't particularly practical want more than just speed. The image and eye candy of driving a NSX, as well as the handling also play an important role.
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Old 10-27-2015, 08:40 PM
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Originally Posted by Malibu Flyer View Post
There is a lot more to the NSX than it's 0-60 time. While i agree with your point that speed has diminishing returns, people who choose to lay down $150-170k for a car that isn't particularly practical want more than just speed. The image and eye candy of driving a NSX, as well as the handling also play an important role.
To paraphrase a line from the movie Bad Boys (the first movie), the "car they were driving was a shinny dick with two chairs and they are the balls just dragging along". If it is the NSX, or any other of that ilk, one could call it a mid life crisis car. I think it is one of the most attractive cars ever made and I would love to own one. However there is that little detail of the $150,000+ issue to get past the misses. Somehow $95,000 for a CTS-V seems cheap by comparison, not that she would fall for that. Maybe one day....
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Old 10-28-2015, 06:37 AM
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When Acura scheduled the 1st drive of the long-awaited 2017 Acura NSX, our list of questions ran off a notebook page. We know pretty much exactly what to expect when a new generation Porsche Cayman or Ferrari mid-engine coupe arrives, but the same cannot be said of Acura.

Honda Motor Company hasn’t taken a stab at a mid-engine sports car since it 1st released the NSX 25 years ago, and the 2017 version has no direct connection to that model — which ended production in 2005 — other than its legendary name.

The original rocked. Fast, inspirational, and economical, it opened up the world of mid-engine sports cars to many car lovers who could never afford or even care about a Ferrari. We’ve heard continual whispers of an NSX successor ever since — getting so far along as a Japanese-led team using a naturally aspirated engine before finally morphing into a turbo-charged hybrid run largely by an American team. It will now arrive as a 2017 model.
No wonder fans have been left with a giant, hovering question mark. What can we expect from the new NSX? Will it be worthy of the name?

We finally have an answer, as we were part of a tiny group worldwide who got a very early drive on both racetrack and open roads. In a nutshell: The new NSX is as contrarian and occasionally conservative as the parent company itself. And it absolutely earns the NSX moniker.


1st, some basics. It is a hybrid. Like the Porsche 918, McLaren P1, and BMW i8, the 2017 Acura NSX uses electric motors — 3 of them — to lend instantaneous torque off the line.

The 3.5-liter gasoline engine is mounted longitudinally behind the cockpit. It is an all-new, twin-turbo V-6 making 500 hp and 406 lb-ft of torque. Peak power, utilizing the electric motors, is 573 hp 476 lb-ft of torque.

A direct-drive electric motor is attached to the engine’s crankshaft. Both work in concert with an all-new, wet-clutch 9-speed dual clutch transmission. The rear electric motor adds power, functions as a generator to help recharge the lithium battery pack, and serves as the starter motor. (Note: The NSX is not a plug-in.)

A twin-motor unit is housed up front. These 2 electric motors each separately drive a front wheel, and are otherwise mechanically independent from the rest of the powertrain. Upon demand, they add extra torque together or independently, aiding acceleration or cornering. In the latter case, they send extra power to the outside wheel, while the other inside wheel is slowed. Voila: Genuine torque vectoring.

This makes the NSX an all-wheel-drive coupe, but when operated in “Quiet” mode it can operate for short periods as an electrically powered front-wheel driver.

Weight is the complexity’s downside: 3,803 lb, with 58 percent distributed to the rear. Acura didn’t pursue a full-on carbon-fiber monocoque, using instead a more traditional mix of aluminum, high-strength steel, and carbon floor. Acura claims it is far more rigid than the Ferrari 458 — 1 of the cars it benchmarked along with the latest Porsche 911 Turbo and Audi R8 V10 Plus.


Indeed, Acura had to take the new NSX’s development very seriously. “We needed to make a real jump in technology,” says Ted Klaus, the NSX global development leader. “And we were sent packing by management more than once, quite frankly, but it was the kind of challenge they wanted us to absorb.” The hybrid powertrain was developed in Tochigi, Japan. But nearly everything else, from the chassis, powertrain integration, interior, and final styling was a product of the American team in Raymond, Ohio, and the Acura Design Studio in Los Angeles. The car will be built in a new plant in Marysville, Ohio.

But Klaus says discussions were often ones of philosophy rather than individual technologies: What did they want the new NSX to be? What should the NSX represent as a company halo?

“We think we’re going to unsettle the sports-car world,” he says. “This is a different kind of sports car than currently exists. A new segment. And it’s going to disturb some people.”

It took me those full 2 days of driving to begin to understand what he was getting at. Because the NSX does rock. But it head-bangs quietly. Think of it as a new class of sports car: The stealth supercar. That’s a concept that takes some time to wrap your head around.


This stealth nature was very much the engineers’ goal. The NSX adheres to the classic “smooth is fast” racing mantra. The quicksilver transmission, magnetic shocks, and sweetly-tuned chassis work overtime so as to never unsettle the car or its pilot. That extends to details like the driver’s seat, which offers the best meld of comfort and rock-solid bolstering I’ve ever experienced. The steering wheel, too, feels like an ideally weighted tool in your palms — with accuracy that’s nearly dead-on perfect. The engineers pained over the length and pressure of the brake-pedal stroke, so it feels consistent in both parking lot and on racetrack. In fact, those brakes are some of the best all-around stoppers I’ve found in both arenas.

The result of all this finesse is that there are certain descriptors you’re unlikely to associate with the NSX: “White knuckles,” “nervous passengers,” and “skittish.” But so too are you unlikely to exit the car and pair it with “roar,” “scream,” or “wail.” Inside, the engine notes are muted, even in sport-plus and track mode. In fact, it is possible to forget that you’re even in a mid-engine car, owing to the stability and the relative lack of rear sound. That will bum out some enthusiasts.

On my first day with the car, at Sonoma Raceway in northern California, I tried out launch control. It’s dead simple: Engage “track” mode, left-foot brake, put gas to floor, release brake. A respectable blip of seconds later, the NSX cleaved through the air at 60 mph on its way to 100. (As is Honda’s wont, it plays very coy with 0-60 mph numbers. My best ass-feel guess is 3.4 seconds.)


But it left me cold. It was fast, but didn’t feel fast-fast. It didn’t grab me by the scruff and whip me around. Didn’t sucker punch me in the solar plexus as I stomped the gas nor chuff me in the chin each time it snap-crackle-popped to the next gear.

Fast forward to the end of my 2nd day with the car, after I’d already gobbled several hundred miles of Golden State twisty roads. My expectations were better tuned with the car’s capabilities. I was in sync with the kind of speed it delivers. A typical moment went like this: A Prius up ahead plodded its way over a sinuous path through the foothills. I shoved down the gas pedal and the blue NSX performed 2 near-instantaneous downshifts. I didn’t feel the change in the car’s spine, none of the chassis tremor that comes in the Lamborghini Huracan when it drops down twice. The 9-speed dual-clutch transmission is in many ways as good as Porsche’s PDK, but it is as polite as a Japanese businessman.

Closing speeds are incredible, and the time the 2 Japanese cars existed side by side was infinitesimal. I was back into the right-hand lane in a lightning second, carrying huge speed into an uphill sweeping turn. The Prius existed somewhere behind me as a thought, a blip in time and space. My passenger was reading an e-mail on his cell at the time. He never even looked up.

So yes, the NSX is exceptionally fast. But you need the context of a good winding road to truly realize it. You’ve got to pass car after car after car in a blinding rush and see telephone poles flick by like toothpicks. Because neither the engine note behind you nor a shriek of tires nor squeal of brakes will announce it for you. Acura has been using an active torque-transfer technology since 1996. The NSX employs what the company terms the “next generation Sport Hybrid Super-Handling All Wheel drive.” The issue with active torque vectoring is that a car doesn’t always respond as you expect it to.


On the racetrack, I briefly tried treating the NSX like a last-gen Audi R8 or current Huracan: Turn early, induce a bit of yaw so the nose is pointed to the exit, and allow the AWD to power me out. But the NSX’s torque vectoring is best when you slow the car through a corner using trail braking. Follow a traditional line, managing both brake pressure and then throttle carefully, and you will be well rewarded. You can carry great speed into corners. Get back on the gas too early though, and the car understeers like mad.

The stability and traction controls are too conservative for my taste, and can only be turned off completely in track mode. Even then they’ll step in if the car senses an impending spin. (The rear wheels are braked individually if the systems think the car is seriously out of shape.)

And yes, the exterior is conservative. I hoped I would love it in the flesh. We got plenty of happy cat-calls and “Hell yeah!” fists shakes as we drove around. But in light of cars like the Huracan and McLaren 570S, and certainly the new Ford GT, the NSX may look all too dated, all too soon.

A few final notes. When it comes to the original NSX’s delights, the new 1 mostly delivers. The dashboard is low and the sight lines marvelously unobstructed. The A pillars are thin. You sit low in the cockpit, yet it’s easy to get in and out. The front is high enough to negotiate most normal curbs and inclines. Everyday practicality achieved.

As for cost: Expect the new car to run north of $150,000 for the base model. That’s well cheaper than any Ferrari or Lamborghini, but puts it within sparring distance of upper-end Porsche 911s and the new McLaren 570S, and makes the Jaguar F-Type R a bargain.


And this: The engineers acknowledge it’s a starting point. A very good 1. But as battery technology gets better and lighter, so too will their car.

The NSX’s approach is a surprising 1, and some will knock its philosophy. But the 2017 Acura NSX isn’t soft rock. More like a power ballad.

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2017 Acura NSX Specifications
On Sale
:     Spring 2016
Base Price
:     $150,000
Engine
:     Rear wheelsTwin-turbo3.5-liter V-6/500 hp 6500-7500 rpm406 lb.-ft. @ 2000-6000 rpm, and electric motorFront wheels2 electric motorsPeak power573 hp
Transmission
:     9-speed dual-clutch automatic
Layout
:     2-doormid-engineAWD coupe
EPA Mileage
:     N/A
Suspension F
/R:     Double-wishbonedouble lower control arm/Multi-link with magnetorheological coilovers
Brakes
:     Vented discs
Tires F
/R:     245/35R-19 305/30R-20 Continental Conti-Sports Contact 5P
L x W x H
:     176.0 X 47.8 X 87.3 in
Wheelbase
:     103.5 in
Headroom
:     38.3 in
Legroom
:     42.8 in
Shoulder Room
:     57.6 in
Cargo Volume
:     3.9 cu ft
Weight
:     3,803 lb
Weight Dist
F/R:     42/58
0
-60 MPH:     3.4 sec (est)
1/4-Mile:     N/A
Top Speed
:     191 mph 
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Old 10-28-2015, 08:02 AM
  #26  
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Once again Honda does it... $150k car with crap tires on it. Almost every automotive journalist wrote about the Contis vs. the Michelin, with the Michelin almost eliminating the under-steer, yet Honda didn't get the message and they are selling the production model with the Contis on it. I wonder if they offer the Michelin as a no-charge accessory or charge an arm and a leg for the switch....

PS. the rims on the white look kinda nice tho.
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Old 10-28-2015, 07:37 PM
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I understand from another article that the Michelins are available. And they seem to make a huge difference. It's a cool car. I want one.
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Old 10-28-2015, 09:47 PM
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God I want this car bad.
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Old 11-01-2015, 04:43 PM
  #29  
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at the dealer the other day

told me due to market demand they went back to customers on the waiting list and told them they want $210k for the base model

who knows if true or not
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Old 11-01-2015, 05:15 PM
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^^ I read somewhere that Acura will not allow people to buy them initially but leases only...this is to prevent dealers from jacking up the price (gouging).

Not sure if this is true or not....
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Old 11-01-2015, 10:40 PM
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Originally Posted by crxb View Post
at the dealer the other day

told me due to market demand they went back to customers on the waiting list and told them they want $210k for the base model

who knows if true or not
I call

I simply don't believe that Acura would shoot itself in the foot like that.

Then again, this is the same Acura that screwed up the RLX launch royally, so who knows.
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Old 11-01-2015, 10:47 PM
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the NSX will start right in the 160k range you can customize it into the 200k+ range. you guys will love how you can build this car.
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Old 11-02-2015, 02:43 PM
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Thumbs up Targa & Type R


Time to get down to business.

It’s been less than a year since the all-new, 2nd generation Acura NSX debuted at Detroit, and sales are set to begin shortly. With demand expected to be high, at least initially, we’ve been hearing about plans to not only keep the NSX fresh but also more competitive against a growing number of rivals. The latest bit of news comes to us today from Australia's CarAdvice who, speaking with NSX project leader Ted Klaus, confirmed that two more NSX variants are in the pipeline.


Expect an open top NSX to arrive fairly soon and it’ll likely pay homage to the original NSX with a targa style removable roof. But what ought to be really quite something is the even more powerful NSX Type R. According to Klaus, the NSX’s "chassis has way more capability, so I wouldn’t be surprised if we take advantage of that in the future as well." If any NSX fans recall, the original NSX Type R, put more of an emphasis on weight reduction as opposed to added power. This time, however, Acura/Honda is intent on doing both. The "base" NSX is powered by a twin-turbocharged 3.5-liter V6 that’s paired to 3 electric motors and a lithium-ion battery pack for a combined output of 573 hp.


The state-of-the-art Super Handling All-Wheel-Drive System, according to Honda, provides superior handling and Ferrari 458-matching acceleration but with far greater fuel efficiency. So when will that NSX targa and Type R appear? No timetable for either has been announced just yet but we’re guessing the targa will come along 1st.

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Old 11-02-2015, 04:57 PM
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Originally Posted by neuronbob View Post
I call

I simply don't believe that Acura would shoot itself in the foot like that.

Then again, this is the same Acura that screwed up the RLX launch royally, so who knows.

I could see dealers doing something like this

whatever the market will take over MSRP

(especially if limited to 800 cars year 1)


- And if a person wanted exclusivity ?
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Old 11-02-2015, 06:41 PM
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Lots of videos out there on YouTube. Here is the autoblog one. If you spend the time to view a few of them, the common theme is that this isn't a super car, but an exotic sport car. Also, the main complaint is steering wheel feel, or lack thereof.

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Old 11-03-2015, 08:14 AM
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Originally Posted by Tonyware View Post
Also, the main complaint is steering wheel feel, or lack thereof.
I'm afraid we just have to get used to that.

There is an innate precision in the Honda/Acura system of steering, but it takes some getting used to. It's almost like a video game.

When you get used to knowing that it's going to happen regardless of how it feels, you're fine.

Modern steering wheels aren't even connected to the steering rack, which is amusing. The steering column doesn't go all the way down. It's interrupted part way to the steering rack so that you can drive by wire.

If there's a complete power failure, if the 250-volt battery and the 12-volt battery both fail, then the lack of a signal to the steering column causes a clutch to pop and engage a physical connection that will allow you to steer the car.

It'll be tough...but possible. :-)

Shall we talk about how the brake pedal with Sport Hybrids is also not connected to anything, or would that be too scary? :-)

I drive the big sedan Sport Hybrid, and my car has a servo that provides artificial brake feel, to keep the pedal high and hard. It's almost hilarious how well it works.
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Old 11-03-2015, 08:18 AM
  #37  
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I'm praying that when the MSRP comes out, it's closer to 200 than 150. :-)

I know my local dealer is going to call me when they get one, and I pray that it's such a high MSRP that it's out of the question.

If it's at 150...it's too close to doable for me to be comfortable and I'm afraid I won't rest until I get one.

Help me.

Make it 200. :-)
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Old 11-03-2015, 08:20 AM
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Originally Posted by Nexx View Post
the NSX will start right in the 160k range you can customize it into the 200k+ range. you guys will love how you can build this car.
Something that irks me is that you can't build it with an HUD, insofar as I can tell.

The HUD in my car is spectacular. They did a better job with it than anybody else that I've experienced.

It's a shame they didn't put it in the NSX Sport Hybrid, because it's excellent in the Legend/RLX Sport Hybrid.

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Old 11-04-2015, 04:27 PM
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Originally Posted by George Knighton View Post
I'm praying that when the MSRP comes out, it's closer to 200 than 150. :-)

I know my local dealer is going to call me when they get one, and I pray that it's such a high MSRP that it's out of the question.

If it's at 150...it's too close to doable for me to be comfortable and I'm afraid I won't rest until I get one.

Help me.

Make it 200. :-)
Just do it, you only live this life once.

Besides, you'll be King of Acurazine if you do. Not that it matters to you, but you would be. I can't even imagine having a RLX Sport Hybrid and a NSX Sport Hybrid in the same driveway right now. Maybe when my son is done with grad school, which I presume I'm paying for too.
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Old 11-04-2015, 04:40 PM
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Originally Posted by Tonyware View Post
Once again Honda does it... $150k car with crap tires on it. Almost every automotive journalist wrote about the Contis vs. the Michelin, with the Michelin almost eliminating the under-steer, yet Honda didn't get the message and they are selling the production model with the Contis on it. I wonder if they offer the Michelin as a no-charge accessory or charge an arm and a leg for the switch....

PS. the rims on the white look kinda nice tho.
you can choose which tires you want. everything about this car will be custom optioned.
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