Will the Plane Take-Off - Merged with MythBusters Show Thread - Page 3 - AcuraZine - Acura Enthusiast Community

Go Back  AcuraZine - Acura Enthusiast Community > Off Topic Discussion > AcuraZine's Hall of Fame
Reload this Page >

Will the Plane Take-Off - Merged with MythBusters Show Thread

Notices

Will the Plane Take-Off - Merged with MythBusters Show Thread

 
 
Old 08-18-2006, 11:38 AM
  #81  
Nom Nom Nom Nom
 
SwervinCL's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2003
Location: Universal City
Age: 39
Posts: 11,804
Thanked 76 Times in 50 Posts
Originally Posted by BEETROOT
You are saying that the reason the plane wouldn't move forward is because the tires spinning on this treadmill would what... not get the traction they needed to move the plane forward?





Doesn't matter if it takes off or not, if you have something generating thrust that relies on air, not contact with the ground, that thing is going to move forward regardless of whether or not there are wheels spinning beneath it. In the case of a jetpack, you will shoot forward and take off due to the thrust alone. In the case of the plane, you will move forward from that same thrust, which then generates lift from the airflow, and take off. Same principle regarding your forward movement, as neither case relies on any contact with the ground to move.
But if the treadmill is matching the velocity of the thrust that the engines are producing, the plane will be stationary.
SwervinCL is offline  
Old 08-18-2006, 11:41 AM
  #82  
Registered Member
 
mclarenf3387's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: Charlotte
Posts: 8,620
Thanked 7 Times in 5 Posts
Originally Posted by SwervinCL
But if the treadmill is matching the velocity of the thrust that the engines are producing, the plane will be stationary.
The thrust is created on the air, not the ground. The plane creates thrust on the air so the speed of the ground is irrellavent.
mclarenf3387 is offline  
Old 08-18-2006, 11:42 AM
  #83  
Nom Nom Nom Nom
 
SwervinCL's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2003
Location: Universal City
Age: 39
Posts: 11,804
Thanked 76 Times in 50 Posts
^ But if the ground is moving in the oppsite direction of the plane, the plane would then be stationary.
SwervinCL is offline  
Old 08-18-2006, 11:43 AM
  #84  
Nom Nom Nom Nom
 
SwervinCL's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2003
Location: Universal City
Age: 39
Posts: 11,804
Thanked 76 Times in 50 Posts
Take the wheels off the plane. Put the plane on the belly. Do you think that the thrust from the engines would be enough to get the plane moving fast enough for it to take off?
SwervinCL is offline  
Old 08-18-2006, 11:43 AM
  #85  
Senior Moderator
iTrader: (1)
 
NSXNEXT's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2000
Location: where the weather suits my clothes
Age: 50
Posts: 27,154
Thanked 741 Times in 463 Posts
Originally Posted by mclarenf3387
The thrust is created on the air, not the ground. The plane creates thrust on the air so the speed of the ground is irrellavent.

Remind me not to enroll my kids in BU.
NSXNEXT is offline  
Old 08-18-2006, 11:43 AM
  #86  
Interesting. Interesting.
 
wstevens's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: NorCal
Age: 46
Posts: 8,704
Thanks: 0
Thanked 15 Times in 15 Posts
Originally Posted by SwervinCL
^ But if the ground is moving in the oppsite direction of the plane, the plane would then be stationary.

Only if the contact between the wheels and the ground is where the thrust vector acts. This is true for a car, but not for a plane.
wstevens is offline  
Old 08-18-2006, 11:45 AM
  #87  
Interesting. Interesting.
 
wstevens's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: NorCal
Age: 46
Posts: 8,704
Thanks: 0
Thanked 15 Times in 15 Posts
Originally Posted by SwervinCL
Take the wheels off the plane. Put the plane on the belly. Do you think that the thrust from the engines would be enough to get the plane moving fast enough for it to take off?
If the engines where big enough, then yes. But it would damage the hell out of the bottom of the plane. You just figured out why planes have wheels.
wstevens is offline  
Old 08-18-2006, 11:45 AM
  #88  
Registered Member
 
mclarenf3387's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: Charlotte
Posts: 8,620
Thanked 7 Times in 5 Posts
Originally Posted by NSXNEXT
Remind me not to enroll my kids in BU.
Shure thing. BU sucks.

I go to Northeastern
mclarenf3387 is offline  
Old 08-18-2006, 11:48 AM
  #89  
Yeehaw
 
BEETROOT's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2003
Location: Chandler, Arizona
Age: 38
Posts: 20,972
Thanked 25 Times in 4 Posts
Originally Posted by NSXNEXT
But Brett it's sitting on a conveyor belt that prevents it from moving forward. The faster the plane goes, the faster the belt turns in the opposite direction. How is the plane going to move forward?
The conveyor belt doesn't prevent it from moving forward. It just moves the wheels, which have nothing to do with the forward motion of the plane.
BEETROOT is offline  
Old 08-18-2006, 11:50 AM
  #90  
fhwagads
 
FuriousGeorge83's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Location: Chicago & Milwaukee
Posts: 1,079
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I dont understand why this is so difficult for you guys to wrap your head around. It doesnt matter if the converybelt matches the speed of the tires on the planes if they spin freely. The plane can move foward and acheive life because of thrust provided by the propellors or turbines on the wings not the tires. even if the tires are spinning at 500mphs and the converybelt matches that speed, the plane would move foward regardless and the tire speed would just accelerate. Its kinda like, how does a plane stay flying? By the thrust of the engines not the tires on the ground same principle at work here, you dont need ground/tires to move an object foward. You can accelerate in mid air because of thrust. The tires have nothing to do with it.

going with the dyno thing, the car doesnt move because of the "convyer" type thing. but that same care would move foward if you could attach a rocket on the roof.

Last edited by FuriousGeorge83; 08-18-2006 at 11:53 AM.
FuriousGeorge83 is offline  
Old 08-18-2006, 11:52 AM
  #91  
Yeehaw
 
BEETROOT's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2003
Location: Chandler, Arizona
Age: 38
Posts: 20,972
Thanked 25 Times in 4 Posts
BEETROOT is offline  
Old 08-18-2006, 11:52 AM
  #92  
Interesting. Interesting.
 
wstevens's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: NorCal
Age: 46
Posts: 8,704
Thanks: 0
Thanked 15 Times in 15 Posts
Originally Posted by BEETROOT
The conveyor belt doesn't prevent it from moving forward. It just moves the wheels, which have nothing to do with the forward motion of the plane.

yep.

This is why a plane can take off on a perfectly frictionless sheet of ice, whereas your car would just spin it's wheels and not move anywhere.
wstevens is offline  
Old 08-18-2006, 11:54 AM
  #93  
Registered Member
 
RyeCL's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2003
Location: Winter Park, FL
Age: 38
Posts: 1,742
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
The plane will fly because the thrust comes from the engines interacting with the air, not the wheels.


edit: also how about a plane taking off from a river, where the water is running the opposite way, it still takes off....

Last edited by RyeCL; 08-18-2006 at 11:56 AM.
RyeCL is offline  
Old 08-18-2006, 11:55 AM
  #94  
Interesting. Interesting.
 
wstevens's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: NorCal
Age: 46
Posts: 8,704
Thanks: 0
Thanked 15 Times in 15 Posts
...and by the way,

Stanford > *
wstevens is offline  
Old 08-18-2006, 11:55 AM
  #95  
Nom Nom Nom Nom
 
SwervinCL's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2003
Location: Universal City
Age: 39
Posts: 11,804
Thanked 76 Times in 50 Posts
I give up.
SwervinCL is offline  
Old 08-18-2006, 12:00 PM
  #96  
Yeehaw
 
BEETROOT's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2003
Location: Chandler, Arizona
Age: 38
Posts: 20,972
Thanked 25 Times in 4 Posts
Originally Posted by wstevens
...and by the way,

Stanford > *

umass, piedmont, ccsu, mcc, scc, rio salado, asu combination > stanford
BEETROOT is offline  
Old 08-18-2006, 12:00 PM
  #97  
Senior Moderator
iTrader: (1)
 
NSXNEXT's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2000
Location: where the weather suits my clothes
Age: 50
Posts: 27,154
Thanked 741 Times in 463 Posts
Originally Posted by SwervinCL
I give up.

Me too.....

I actually googled the correct answer back on page 1 but felt it was fun playing the other side
NSXNEXT is offline  
Old 08-18-2006, 12:05 PM
  #98  
Nom Nom Nom Nom
 
SwervinCL's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2003
Location: Universal City
Age: 39
Posts: 11,804
Thanked 76 Times in 50 Posts
Wheres F900 when you need him.
SwervinCL is offline  
Old 08-18-2006, 12:07 PM
  #99  
Registered Member
 
sipark's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2004
Location: D.C. area
Age: 41
Posts: 3,457
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Of course it WILL fly!

The wheels do not provide thrust, it's the Jet engine that makes it go forward.
So, no matter how fast the belt spins, the airplan will move forward. The wheels will just spin fater than the speed of the conveyer belt.


EDIT: I should've read the entire thread... I'm on BEET's side.

Last edited by sipark; 08-18-2006 at 12:09 PM.
sipark is offline  
Old 08-18-2006, 12:08 PM
  #100  
Nom Nom Nom Nom
 
SwervinCL's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2003
Location: Universal City
Age: 39
Posts: 11,804
Thanked 76 Times in 50 Posts
OK, I read the post on Jason Kottke's site about the The case of the plane and conveyor belt, and quickly concluded that the plane cannot take off.

I was shocked, SHOCKED, to find smart people like Matt Haughey and Mike Buffington believing that the plane can take off.

Let me clear this up.

For an aircraft of any type to fly, it must overcome the constant acceration downward of gravity. Flying, for the most part, has little to do with speed and everything to do with the lifting force that counteracts the pull of gravity. Got that? Lifting force is all the matter to leave the ground and fly.

The question then is how do you generate enough lifting force. With a balloon, the lifting force is based on the fact that a bag of lighter-than-normal-air gas (usually hydrogen, helium, or hot air) will rise above normal (cold) air. Make sense? A balloon has no direct thrust or "push against air", it simply has the lifitng force of the gas.

Now let's look at an airplane. How does an airplane fly? An airplane flys off the ground solely because it can generate a lifting force. An airplane generates this lifting force by air flowing over an airfoil (known as a wing). The faster the air travels over the wing, the more lift is generated.

Planes that go fast can generate a lot of speed (air moving past the wings) can generate a lot of lift. If an airplne goes too slow, it doesn't generate enough lift to counteract the force of gravity, and it falls to the ground. This is called a stall.

So, now that you are versed in the basics of aerodynamics, let's look at the question of the airplane on the conveyer belt. The airplane will sit on the conveyer belt with engines blasting, tires rolling, and to the outside observer, standing in place. While tremendous forward force is being generated, there is no increase on the airflow over the wings.

So, if there is is no increased airflow over the wing, there is no lift. Without lift, the airplane CANNOT take off and fly. Let me repeat that key part, without lift, the airplane CANNOT take off and fly. It doesn't matter how hard the engines 'push the air', there is no lift being generated in the conveyor belt scenario.

I hope you can now see clearly the correct answer to the 'question' is that the plane will not take off.

If you start to argue about the validity of the basic aerodynamic theory of lift, you might as well start arguing that the earth is flat or in creationism.

Update: After reading the comments it seems like the debate is hinging on whether the plane stays stationary or not. Obviously above I'm assuming the plane/conveyor belt contrapion is designed to hold the plane still. If that is not assumed then then the entire question is stupid and ridiculous. It's then like asking can a plane take off in the rain or snow when the wheels slip.

If that's really the point that the question poser is making then it's fucking stupid. It's like those stupid tests where the first line says "1) Read all instructions carefully before taking the test" and the last line says "57) Now that you've read all the instructions carefully, don't do 2-56, write your name in and turn in the test." Fuck that shit.
http://cruftbox.com/blog/archives/001252.html
SwervinCL is offline  
Old 08-18-2006, 12:10 PM
  #101  
Registered Member
 
mclarenf3387's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: Charlotte
Posts: 8,620
Thanked 7 Times in 5 Posts
Originally Posted by SwervinCL
Wheres F900 when you need him.
Last I checked wstevens was an aeronautical engineer with a degree from Stanford, so if you don't want to believe him, I don't know who your gonna believe.
mclarenf3387 is offline  
Old 08-18-2006, 12:10 PM
  #102  
Interesting. Interesting.
 
wstevens's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: NorCal
Age: 46
Posts: 8,704
Thanks: 0
Thanked 15 Times in 15 Posts
Another way to think about it: the plane is landing on a conveyor belt that is going in the opposite direction and same speed as the plane. The plane touches down and the engines are still on. Will the plane come to a dead stop instantly?

Last edited by wstevens; 08-18-2006 at 12:14 PM.
wstevens is offline  
Old 08-18-2006, 12:10 PM
  #103  
On the way!
 
fla-tls's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2001
Location: Orlando, FL
Age: 50
Posts: 3,715
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by NSXNEXT
But Brett it's sitting on a conveyor belt that prevents it from moving forward. The faster the plane goes, the faster the belt turns in the opposite direction. How is the plane going to move forward?
OK - here's another way of thinking about it. You're walking on your manual treadmill, and your friend Mr. Jet engine comes behind you and pushes or tackles you forward. Do you move forward on the treadmill? Yes - probably fall off it. Why didn't the treadmill counteract that forward motion? Your friend's force is independant of the treadmill.

The thrust from the engines is independant of the surface that the plane sits on. Drag is the only thing that will cause the plane to not move (that - or a big cement wall...).

You can't compare it to a dyno. Planes to not generate forward momentum by driving their wheels. You strap a jet plane to a dyno - and it will read 0 hp. The force is through the movement of air through the engine.
fla-tls is offline  
Old 08-18-2006, 12:15 PM
  #104  
Yeehaw
 
BEETROOT's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2003
Location: Chandler, Arizona
Age: 38
Posts: 20,972
Thanked 25 Times in 4 Posts
Originally Posted by SwervinCL
Did you even read that?

Update: After reading the comments it seems like the debate is hinging on whether the plane stays stationary or not. Obviously above I'm assuming the plane/conveyor belt contrapion is designed to hold the plane still. If that is not assumed then then the entire question is stupid and ridiculous. It's then like asking can a plane take off in the rain or snow when the wheels slip.
There is no reason to assume there is any physical contraption holding the plane still. He admitted the plane would take off
BEETROOT is offline  
Old 08-18-2006, 12:16 PM
  #105  
Senior Moderator
iTrader: (1)
 
NSXNEXT's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2000
Location: where the weather suits my clothes
Age: 50
Posts: 27,154
Thanked 741 Times in 463 Posts
Originally Posted by fla-tls
OK - here's another way of thinking about it. You're walking on your manual treadmill, and your friend Mr. Jet engine comes behind you and pushes or tackles you forward. Do you move forward on the treadmill? Yes - probably fall off it. Why didn't the treadmill counteract that forward motion? Your friend's force is independant of the treadmill.

The thrust from the engines is independant of the surface that the plane sits on. Drag is the only thing that will cause the plane to not move (that - or a big cement wall...).

You can't compare it to a dyno. Planes to not generate forward momentum by driving their wheels. You strap a jet plane to a dyno - and it will read 0 hp. The force is through the movement of air through the engine.

Terrible analogy because the treadmill belt does not control your speed. If you run faster than the treadmill is moving you will move forward.

Oh and I guess no one bothered to read my response on post #97.
NSXNEXT is offline  
Old 08-18-2006, 12:17 PM
  #106  
Registered Member
 
levon1830's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Florida
Age: 36
Posts: 1,440
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Wow, the more I think about, the more I think I was wrong when I first said the plane would not takeoff.


















Fuck.
levon1830 is offline  
Old 08-18-2006, 12:21 PM
  #107  
Interesting. Interesting.
 
wstevens's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: NorCal
Age: 46
Posts: 8,704
Thanks: 0
Thanked 15 Times in 15 Posts
Do an experiment:
1) Go to a treadmill with a toy truck that has passive wheels.
2) Program the treadmill to go 1 MPH.
3) Place the toy truck on the treadmill and see if you can push the truck to make it go 1 MPH toward the front of the treadmill.
4) Now take the truck off the treadmill and see if you can push the truck to make it go 1 MPH on the stationary ground.

Did you have to apply more force to get the truck to move 1 MPH on a treadwill than on the stationary ground? If not, did you notice that the only difference was the truck's wheels spun with a greater RPM on the treadmill?
wstevens is offline  
Old 08-18-2006, 12:21 PM
  #108  
Senior Moderator
 
Mr Hyde's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2001
Location: Long Island, NY
Age: 42
Posts: 5,429
Thanked 588 Times in 277 Posts
I think more people need to think of this as a riddle (which is what it is) instead of a practical application.

The answer is yes the plane will take off if the treadmill is the length of whatever runway length the plane needs to take off. That of course makes this whole thing a mute point, and explains why you'll never see this in real life.

It doesnt matter what speed the treadmill moves at since the wheels are just spinning freely. The spinning propeller/jet engine will still move the plane forward through the air, and it will NOT remain stationary on the treadmill.
Mr Hyde is offline  
Old 08-18-2006, 12:22 PM
  #109  
Nom Nom Nom Nom
 
SwervinCL's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2003
Location: Universal City
Age: 39
Posts: 11,804
Thanked 76 Times in 50 Posts
I didnt read all the comments below. Just what I quoted.

So whats the real answer? If im wrong, ill admit it. Just logically to me anyways, the plane wont take off. I want more of an answer than just "it will take off"
SwervinCL is offline  
Old 08-18-2006, 12:23 PM
  #110  
Nom Nom Nom Nom
 
SwervinCL's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2003
Location: Universal City
Age: 39
Posts: 11,804
Thanked 76 Times in 50 Posts
Originally Posted by Mr Hyde
I think more people need to think of this as a riddle (which is what it is) instead of a practical application.

The answer is yes the plane will take off if the treadmill is the length of whatever runway length the plane needs to take off. That of course makes this whole thing a mute point, and explains why you'll never see this in real life.

It doesnt matter what speed the treadmill moves at since the wheels are just spinning freely. The spinning propeller/jet engine will still move the plane forward through the air, and it will NOT remain stationary on the treadmill.
Why wont the plane stay stationary if the treadmill is matching the speed of thrust that the engines are producing?
SwervinCL is offline  
Old 08-18-2006, 12:26 PM
  #111  
Senior Moderator
 
Mr Hyde's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2001
Location: Long Island, NY
Age: 42
Posts: 5,429
Thanked 588 Times in 277 Posts
Originally Posted by SwervinCL
Why wont the plane stay stationary if the treadmill is matching the speed of thrust that the engines are producing?
Because the thrust is pulling the plane through the air while the treadmill is pushing the wheels only backward. The plane still moves forward.

Let me ask this, and maybe you can understand a little better.

If a car driving 50mph drives into a 50mph headwind going the opposite direction, does the car stop, or continue forward?
Mr Hyde is offline  
Old 08-18-2006, 12:26 PM
  #112  
Interesting. Interesting.
 
wstevens's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: NorCal
Age: 46
Posts: 8,704
Thanks: 0
Thanked 15 Times in 15 Posts
Originally Posted by SwervinCL
Why wont the plane stay stationary if the treadmill is matching the speed of thrust that the engines are producing?
By Newton's Law, the only way the plane can stay stationary is if equal and opposite forces are acting on it. So, the treadmill force has to counteract the engine force.

The engine force acts directly on the plane. Because the wheels don't lock, they just spin, there is no way to transmit the force from the treadmill to the plane. It is just transmitted to the wheels.

Last edited by wstevens; 08-18-2006 at 12:30 PM.
wstevens is offline  
Old 08-18-2006, 12:28 PM
  #113  
Yeehaw
 
BEETROOT's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2003
Location: Chandler, Arizona
Age: 38
Posts: 20,972
Thanked 25 Times in 4 Posts
Originally Posted by SwervinCL
Why wont the plane stay stationary if the treadmill is matching the speed of thrust that the engines are producing?
Because the thrust is independent of the wheels spinning. Think of wstevens example of pushing a toy truck on a treadmill. The thrust is like your hand, pushing the truck/plane forward regardless of how fast the wheels are spinning.



So this conveyor belt situation would stop a car from moving forward, since the spinning treadmill would counter the force generated from the spinning of the wheels. To stop a plane from moving forward, you would need something to counter the thrust of a jet/propeller engine, like another jet/propeller engine pushing in the opposite direction.
BEETROOT is offline  
Old 08-18-2006, 12:33 PM
  #114  
Nom Nom Nom Nom
 
SwervinCL's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2003
Location: Universal City
Age: 39
Posts: 11,804
Thanked 76 Times in 50 Posts
Im wrong... I read it. It makes sense now.
This is what I just read.
http://www.straightdope.com/columns/060203.html
SwervinCL is offline  
Old 08-18-2006, 12:34 PM
  #115  
Senior Moderator
 
Mr Hyde's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2001
Location: Long Island, NY
Age: 42
Posts: 5,429
Thanked 588 Times in 277 Posts
If the plane accelerated using its wheels, it would be stuck in one spot, and not generate the lift needed to take off, but since it uses its prop/jet engine to accelerate, the prop/jet will pull the plane forward while its wheels spin freely on the runway length treadmill.
Mr Hyde is offline  
Old 08-18-2006, 12:39 PM
  #116  
On the way!
 
fla-tls's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2001
Location: Orlando, FL
Age: 50
Posts: 3,715
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by NSXNEXT
Terrible analogy because the treadmill belt does not control your speed. If you run faster than the treadmill is moving you will move forward.

Oh and I guess no one bothered to read my response on post #97.
^
l
i
f
t
<-thrust-+-drag->
g
r
a
v
i
t
y
v

Those are the 4 forces that act on a plane. The treadmill will not affect any of them. A treadmill that keeps moving forward will not affect thrust or it's affect on aircraft motion & resulting lift in any way (ok - the rolling resistance of the tires would be there). The treadmill could be moving 1000mph. If there's enough thrust, the plane will still move forward through the air and take off.

I give up...

Last edited by fla-tls; 08-18-2006 at 12:42 PM.
fla-tls is offline  
Old 08-18-2006, 12:44 PM
  #117  
Senior Moderator
 
Mr Hyde's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2001
Location: Long Island, NY
Age: 42
Posts: 5,429
Thanked 588 Times in 277 Posts
Originally Posted by fla-tls

I give up...
LOL, Let me help here. In post 97, if you highlight the whole thing, this is what you will find. After Me too...., the rest of the this text is in white font.

Originally Posted by NSXNEXT
Me too.....

I actually googled the correct answer back on page 1 but felt it was fun playing the other side


Sorry Neil, I could tell you were torturing him, had to break it to him
Mr Hyde is offline  
Old 08-18-2006, 12:47 PM
  #118  
Senior Moderator
iTrader: (1)
 
NSXNEXT's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2000
Location: where the weather suits my clothes
Age: 50
Posts: 27,154
Thanked 741 Times in 463 Posts
OK now that we've all had our fun...

The plane generates thrust by accelerating air opposite the desired direction of travel, it blows air backwards to move forward. Unlike a car that generates motion by pushing against the ground. So as long as the forward motion of the plane causes airflow over the wing to generate sufficient lift it will fly. The effect of the conveyer to exactly counter the detected motion of the plane should only serve to cause the wheels to rotate at twice the actual speed. The wheels are not the source of any thrust so countering their motion has no effect on forward motion. This assumes that the entire runway remains fixed in location although the surface is moving in a conveyer fashion.
NSXNEXT is offline  
Old 08-18-2006, 12:48 PM
  #119  
Senior Moderator
iTrader: (1)
 
NSXNEXT's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2000
Location: where the weather suits my clothes
Age: 50
Posts: 27,154
Thanked 741 Times in 463 Posts
Originally Posted by Mr Hyde
LOL, Let me help here. In post 97, if you highlight the whole thing, this is what you will find. After Me too...., the rest of the this text is in white font.



Sorry Neil, I could tell you were torturing him, had to break it to him

Funny, after a while I started to believe what I was saying. It's pretty interesting the answers people gave for why it would or would not fly.
NSXNEXT is offline  
Old 08-18-2006, 12:49 PM
  #120  
On the way!
 
fla-tls's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2001
Location: Orlando, FL
Age: 50
Posts: 3,715
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by NSXNEXT
Me too.....

I actually googled the correct answer back on page 1 but felt it was fun playing the other side
YOU BASTARD!

We need a fish hook smiley - because I fell for that one big time!

fla-tls is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Quick Reply: Will the Plane Take-Off - Merged with MythBusters Show Thread


Contact Us Advertising Cookie Policy Privacy Statement Terms of Service

© 2019 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands

We are a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for us to earn fees by linking to Amazon.com and affiliated sites.