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Refrigerant for 3G TLs

Old 12-27-2018, 11:00 PM
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Refrigerant for 3G TLs



Hey guys, I've got an 06 TL and I'm trying to confirm that this refrigerant is a good choice. The AC nor heat get very cold/hot anymore and the blowing strength isn't great either. The previous owner bought this and said he never got around to using it so I figured I'd give it a try. I've read some comments on here though about being extra careful with refrigerant cause if you use the wrong one or do something wrong you'll just make it worse. Can anyone confirm if this is the right stuff?
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Old 12-27-2018, 11:09 PM
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I wouldn’t use it myself. That’s me tho. I just tried it with a truck I had, and it worked for 2wks, and then died. I’d just maybe, check your heater control valve first, see if the cable moves the valve at all.?

If nothing else, take it to someone who works with a/c, I had a leaking schrader valve on the high side of my TL, my mechanic hooked up some gauges, and an exhaust vacuum, evacuated what lil (to him) refrigerant was in the system. Then he refilled the system. Replaced high side schrader valve, and it’s been working fine since. (I had no cold air...)

Someone else with more knowledge will chime in, I hope!


Schrader valve thread.....if you need it.

https://acurazine.com/forums/3g-tl-p...-sizes-958931/

Last edited by Slpr04UA6; 12-27-2018 at 11:20 PM.
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Old 12-27-2018, 11:42 PM
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For the intensity at which the air is blowing, unfortunately this is a whole different issue.
You also may want to have your car OBD scanned as from what I understand is that they have some issues with the internal AC motors and actuators within the dash.. They set off manufacturer specific codes telling you a general idea of what is wrong. My regular run of the mill OBD scanner doesn't read this deep, but the one they use at Advance Auto did with no issue.

I would say don't use anything with "stop leak" in it... which AC Pro does. House brand refrigerant cans are almost always pure R134a refrigerant. Stop leak messes with components in the long run and it DOESN'T fix leaks lol. If you wanna just see if it works by putting refrigerant in it then use just pain jane refrigerant with a universal hose WITH GAUGE. On the back of the cans will tell you in ounces what it contains. Those cans that you have usually have 3 to 4oz of 'additives' which consist of PAG oil and stop leak.

Turn your car on, put your car at max cold, make sure the AC button is pressed so your compressor cycles. If it doesn't cycle or click on/off it may be low on refrigerant or some type of electrical issue is happening. Find the low side port (the hose will only fit on the low side... high side is too large) and attach the hose/gauge *without attaching it to a can first* to the low side port and see your initial pressure. If it's somewhere under 15ish psi then you'l likely need refrigerant. If so, attach the can and start filling in about 4-5 second intervals pressing and releasing the trigger. Check pressures in between intervals. I'd say fill to 30-35psi to be safe. When filling shake the can slightly and tilt it 90+ degrees so the nozzle is pointing slightly downward.

Filling the system based off of only pressures is extremely rudimentary and flawed as you can never know how many ounces are currently in the system so fill to safe pressures. The only way to know how much is in the system is if it's entirely empty by vacuum and then you find your spec in ounces and fill accordingly. Shops will usually weigh the cans before/during/after to calculate how much went in.
Now you can use the stop leak stuff but it's nasty and it ruins professional equipment when they evacuate the the AC system. They almost always don't fix the leak and the additives remain in the system until properly flushed. A proper way to find a leak if present is add dye into the lines (you can pour dye into the hose you're filling the AC with).
As for the intensity at which the air is blowing, unfortunately this is a whole different issue.
You also may want to have your car OBD scanned as from what I understand is that they have some issues with the internal AC motors and actuators within the dash.. They set off manufacturer specific codes telling you a general idea of what is wrong. My regular run of the mill OBD scanner doesn't read this deep, but the one they use at Advance Auto did with no issue.
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Old 12-28-2018, 07:57 PM
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Originally Posted by Striball View Post
For the intensity at which the air is blowing, unfortunately this is a whole different issue.
You also may want to have your car OBD scanned as from what I understand is that they have some issues with the internal AC motors and actuators within the dash.. They set off manufacturer specific codes telling you a general idea of what is wrong. My regular run of the mill OBD scanner doesn't read this deep, but the one they use at Advance Auto did with no issue.

I would say don't use anything with "stop leak" in it... which AC Pro does. House brand refrigerant cans are almost always pure R134a refrigerant. Stop leak messes with components in the long run and it DOESN'T fix leaks lol. If you wanna just see if it works by putting refrigerant in it then use just pain jane refrigerant with a universal hose WITH GAUGE. On the back of the cans will tell you in ounces what it contains. Those cans that you have usually have 3 to 4oz of 'additives' which consist of PAG oil and stop leak.

Turn your car on, put your car at max cold, make sure the AC button is pressed so your compressor cycles. If it doesn't cycle or click on/off it may be low on refrigerant or some type of electrical issue is happening. Find the low side port (the hose will only fit on the low side... high side is too large) and attach the hose/gauge *without attaching it to a can first* to the low side port and see your initial pressure. If it's somewhere under 15ish psi then you'l likely need refrigerant. If so, attach the can and start filling in about 4-5 second intervals pressing and releasing the trigger. Check pressures in between intervals. I'd say fill to 30-35psi to be safe. When filling shake the can slightly and tilt it 90+ degrees so the nozzle is pointing slightly downward.

Filling the system based off of only pressures is extremely rudimentary and flawed as you can never know how many ounces are currently in the system so fill to safe pressures. The only way to know how much is in the system is if it's entirely empty by vacuum and then you find your spec in ounces and fill accordingly. Shops will usually weigh the cans before/during/after to calculate how much went in.
Now you can use the stop leak stuff but it's nasty and it ruins professional equipment when they evacuate the the AC system. They almost always don't fix the leak and the additives remain in the system until properly flushed. A proper way to find a leak if present is add dye into the lines (you can pour dye into the hose you're filling the AC with).
As for the intensity at which the air is blowing, unfortunately this is a whole different issue.
You also may want to have your car OBD scanned as from what I understand is that they have some issues with the internal AC motors and actuators within the dash.. They set off manufacturer specific codes telling you a general idea of what is wrong. My regular run of the mill OBD scanner doesn't read this deep, but the one they use at Advance Auto did with no issue.
Wow that was a very detailed answer! Thank you! I'll probably just go ahead and dispose of that can AC Pro stuff then. Is there any chance it could be my radiator? When I had my timing belt and water pump service done the shop I go to said they recommend replacing my radiator soon. Its seems like a very simple job that I can do myself in an hour or two.
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Old 12-28-2018, 08:10 PM
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Sorry that my post had said the same thing 2x, forgot to proof read lol.

But yeah, no the radiator is a whole separate system, but in front of the radiator is the condenser which is basically an ac 'radiator'. They both share the same fresh air flow from outside the car and as long as your radiator fan is working then it's safe to say that your condenser is doing it's job.
Radiator is kinda complicated but it's an easy-ish job, just lots of peripherals to remove and reinstall which makes it time consuming. You can usually smell antifreeze once the car is warm and if that's the case there's likely a leak or some seeping happening. Is it leaking or can you see any hairline cracks in the plastic areas? Check all the radiator hoses while you're in there. Radiators that are looking green-brown in color are pretty old and may or may not last.
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Old 12-29-2018, 01:51 AM
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Originally Posted by Striball View Post
Sorry that my post had said the same thing 2x, forgot to proof read lol.

But yeah, no the radiator is a whole separate system, but in front of the radiator is the condenser which is basically an ac 'radiator'. They both share the same fresh air flow from outside the car and as long as your radiator fan is working then it's safe to say that your condenser is doing it's job.
Radiator is kinda complicated but it's an easy-ish job, just lots of peripherals to remove and reinstall which makes it time consuming. You can usually smell antifreeze once the car is warm and if that's the case there's likely a leak or some seeping happening. Is it leaking or can you see any hairline cracks in the plastic areas? Check all the radiator hoses while you're in there. Radiators that are looking green-brown in color are pretty old and may or may not last.
I dont seem to be leaking any coolant. I purchased the car in September and haven't had to fill the coolant up at all. It's right in the middle of the minimum and maximum fill lines. Oil looks fine too so I theres no coolant leaking into the engine oil either. I didn't ask why they recommended replacing the radiator but they're pretty knowledgeable. It's a shop that's been recommended to me by other TL owners and supposedly the shop owner has a 3G TL but I haven't seen one parked there anytime I've went lol. The car has 177k miles so I might preemptively replace the radiator and hoses soon anyways.
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Old 12-30-2018, 05:23 AM
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i used the same one and blows ice cold for over a year now.

one tip. put some soapy water on the input port to see if your valve is leaking. i did and it was leaking from the port. had the system sucked out and replaced the valves, just normal schrader valves and topped off with the refrigerant you used. ICE COLD.
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