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2019 RDX TMPS (Reset Sensors)

 
Old 05-14-2019, 04:36 PM
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2019 RDX TMPS (Reset Sensors)

Rotate Wheels:
Does the TPMS (Sensors in the wheels) need to be "Reset" or put into "Learn" mode after the wheels have been rotated?
If so, How is that done? (I think you just drive the car a little and it will "Learn" the new locations.

Wheels Swap:
What about when swapping to a set of winter wheels with different TMPS in the wheels? (The same stock OEM sensors, just four other in the the winter wheels.)
Will it see the new (Same type but not the original four) sensors after driving around?



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Old 05-14-2019, 05:15 PM
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No, they continually read the pressure of each tire, and report by location. When you move a tire, it will correctly report the pressure from the new location.
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Old 05-15-2019, 01:41 AM
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Originally Posted by Madd Dog View Post
No, they continually read the pressure of each tire, and report by location. When you move a tire, it will correctly report the pressure from the new location.
That's pretty cool. How does it know?
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Old 05-15-2019, 06:38 AM
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Originally Posted by Alias1431 View Post
That's pretty cool. How does it know?


Found this. https://community.cengage.com/Chilto...toring-systems

Two types of direct tire pressure monitors are currently in use: high line and low line. High-line systems use low frequency transmitters near each wheel to force wheel-mounted sensors to transmit air pressure information when the ignition is switched on and then periodically as the vehicle is in motion. The transmitters are activated one at a time in sequence so that the system can determine the location of the wheel with low pressure. Some vehicles use only three transmitters to save money. High-line direct tire pressure systems tend to be used on higher-end models.

Low-line system sensors transmit their own signals. Since two or more sensors on a vehicle may transmit simultaneously, individual systems use different methods to ensure signals are received by the vehicle. On some systems the message is re-transmitted in a random or pseudo random pattern multiple times to reduce the effect of interference on communication. Another method is to simply transmit signals more frequently. When sensors detect a rapid change in pressure or a temperature that is too high, they start to transmit immediately. Low-line systems are used on the majority of vehicles due to their lower cost.

Last edited by Madd Dog; 05-15-2019 at 06:49 AM.
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Old 05-16-2019, 09:09 AM
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Originally Posted by Madd Dog View Post
No, they continually read the pressure of each tire, and report by location. When you move a tire, it will correctly report the pressure from the new location.
Thanks. I understand how the system reads the sensors. (Locations, while driving.)
That being said, will that work if four new sensors, (Not the original four) are introduced to the vehicle via "snow tires/wheels" swap?
Is there any special "learning" mode for the totally new sensors before the vehicle would see them in their four locations?
(or just swap and drive?)
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Old 05-16-2019, 11:03 AM
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Originally Posted by classiccars View Post
Thanks. I understand how the system reads the sensors. (Locations, while driving.)
That being said, will that work if four new sensors, (Not the original four) are introduced to the vehicle via "snow tires/wheels" swap?
Is there any special "learning" mode for the totally new sensors before the vehicle would see them in their four locations?
(or just swap and drive?)
I donít know.
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Old 05-16-2019, 11:37 AM
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Originally Posted by classiccars View Post
Thanks. I understand how the system reads the sensors. (Locations, while driving.)
That being said, will that work if four new sensors, (Not the original four) are introduced to the vehicle via "snow tires/wheels" swap?
Is there any special "learning" mode for the totally new sensors before the vehicle would see them in their four locations?
(or just swap and drive?)
No learning mode, it just works. Swap and Drive.

The system will learn the new sensors at the new locations. It will also recognize that sensors have been moved during a tire rotation.

Unlike some previous systems, no user or shop intervention is required, so DO NOT let any tire shop guy hook up a scanner and start screwing around.

I swap on winter wheels every year, with multiple Acura vehicles using this system. No issues. Except some tire shop guys getting frustrated with their darn scanner. So I usually DIY.

If you want to know more, the TPMS sensors are made by Continental.

The smart electronics in the sensor store software/settings to interface with multiple different car manufacturer systems and models.

But it is important to buy the correct flavor of the sensors for a particular make, model, and year. A single version doesn't support ALL cars, just some. And not all cars support this style of sensor or the 433 MHz transmission frequency used by 2019 RDX and the compatible sensor.

https://www.continental-automotive.c...itoring-System

Last edited by Wander; 05-16-2019 at 11:43 AM.
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Old 05-16-2019, 03:44 PM
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Like all current Honda/Acura models with a direct TPMS, the RDX has a low-frequency antenna (called an "initiator") mounted near each of the four wheels. The vehicle will periodically send a request signal to each of these four antennae - one at a time. Only the sensor nearest each antenna will respond with the sensor ID, tire pressure, and tire temperature at a higher frequency which is received by an antenna in the keyless access/TPMS control unit.

Because the vehicle can request information from each TPMS sensor individually, no programming is required for tire rotations, wheel swaps, or sensor replacements.
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Old 05-16-2019, 05:39 PM
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Originally Posted by zroger73 View Post
Like all current Honda/Acura models with a direct TPMS, the RDX has a low-frequency antenna (called an "initiator") mounted near each of the four wheels. The vehicle will periodically send a request signal to each of these four antennae - one at a time. Only the sensor nearest each antenna will respond with the sensor ID, tire pressure, and tire temperature at a higher frequency which is received by an antenna in the keyless access/TPMS control unit.

Because the vehicle can request information from each TPMS sensor individually, no programming is required for tire rotations, wheel swaps, or sensor replacements.
Also, if the sensors aren't being polled by the initiators, they go into a sleep mode to save battery power.

Stored wheels stay in sleep mode. So my winter TPMS sensors may outlive me. Maybe I need to sleep more?
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Old 05-17-2019, 07:05 PM
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Originally Posted by classiccars View Post
Thanks. I understand how the system reads the sensors. (Locations, while driving.)
That being said, will that work if four new sensors, (Not the original four) are introduced to the vehicle via "snow tires/wheels" swap?
Is there any special "learning" mode for the totally new sensors before the vehicle would see them in their four locations?
(or just swap and drive?)
Nope. Each fender has a receiver that reads the transmitter in the wheel. It generally takes a few minutes of driving for the transmitter and receiver to "link up" after a wheel swap.
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Old 05-17-2019, 07:30 PM
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Originally Posted by ceb View Post
Nope. Each fender has a receiver that reads the transmitter in the wheel. It generally takes a few minutes of driving for the transmitter and receiver to "link up" after a wheel swap.
I can confirm that this is correct. A couple of months ago, I bought new wheels and TPMS sensors for my 2019 Ridgeline (which uses the same TPMS system design as the RDX). The dealer insisted that they required programming, but I insisted that they only install the TPMS sensors in the new wheels and let me have my vehicle back. Within a few blocks of driving, each new sensor woke up and registered the correct pressure after briefly displaying 58 PSI.

In defense of the dealer, the service information does state that new TPMS sensors should not be learned automatically and should be manually programmed instead. However, I suspect that's to keep the tech from having to drive the vehicle for several minutes and to ensure the sensors are properly registered and indicating the correct pressure before the customer picks up their vehicle.
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Old 05-18-2019, 09:05 AM
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Originally Posted by zroger73 View Post
I can confirm that this is correct. A couple of months ago, I bought new wheels and TPMS sensors for my 2019 Ridgeline (which uses the same TPMS system design as the RDX). The dealer insisted that they required programming, but I insisted that they only install the TPMS sensors in the new wheels and let me have my vehicle back. Within a few blocks of driving, each new sensor woke up and registered the correct pressure after briefly displaying 58 PSI.

In defense of the dealer, the service information does state that new TPMS sensors should not be learned automatically and should be manually programmed instead. However, I suspect that's to keep the tech from having to drive the vehicle for several minutes and to ensure the sensors are properly registered and indicating the correct pressure before the customer picks up their vehicle.
Yeah. Older Hondas required the sensors to be paired to the car using a special tool, but that is no longer required.
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