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So brake and fuel lines are stainless steel and not PVF coated???

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So brake and fuel lines are stainless steel and not PVF coated???

 
Old 04-27-2019, 08:10 PM
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So brake and fuel lines are stainless steel and not PVF coated???

Had Infiniti 97 and all lines was PVF coated. Those are black in color. No one problem with any line ever, not a drop of rust ever. Checked today at Evap canister (rear of car) and all lines in its vicinity including brake lines are badly rusted. I guess fuel lines go buy right wheel. I can not fix something till stop working but it is only question of time when some line will rust through. As I understand ours lines are stainless steel. How much I dig there is problem connect stainless steel and PVF lines because of different flare angle at end. Did anyone replaced brake or fuel line and what he used? How much I'm informed PVF lines are standard for all cars. How is possible acura do not have that lines?
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Old 04-28-2019, 05:27 PM
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This is schematics of our brake lines and someone selling his aftermarket brake lines. I circled where my brake lines are rusted. So we have two lines that go to back, not only one. See how aftermarket brake lines are not one piece than have a few joints. Most likely for easier installation.
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Old 04-28-2019, 05:37 PM
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Originally Posted by bbsitum View Post
I guess fuel lines go buy right wheel.
This is wrong as fuel lines go along brake lines. They are rusted to. NAPA is selling only PVF coated line for everything, brake line, transmission line, fuel line. Seller there say me they are superior to anything else and I agree with him.
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Old 04-28-2019, 05:49 PM
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^
So, why not invest in a SAE / Metric Double Flaring Brake Line Tool Kit, like the one on the link below, purchase the appropriate fittings and a length of PVF coated or regular line from NAPA and replace what is rusted?

https://www.ebay.com/itm/SAE-Metric-...-/352416479146

Last edited by zeta; 04-28-2019 at 05:53 PM.
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Old 04-28-2019, 06:59 PM
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^^^ I simply buy what length I need from NAPA that are already flared https://www.napaonline.com/en/p/BK_8135511. Did in past so for my pickup, probably would work for Acura. Checked again. All line are rusted in circled area, fuel lines too. But they are not rusted through. Probably will do in Fall.
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Old 04-28-2019, 07:21 PM
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If you only need to replace the line in the circled area with the NAPA line, how are you going to connect or patch that to the remaining OEM line?
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Old 04-28-2019, 08:18 PM
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^^^ It would not make sense. Will replace from splitter, nr 5 in picture, all way to back both lines.
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Old 04-28-2019, 09:04 PM
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^
#6; Brake Pipe C - 46330-S0K-A00; $95.26
#7; Brake Pipe D - 46340-S0K-A00; $85.45
Total of $180.71 before shipping from Acura.


How many lengths do you need to purchase from NAPA and at what cost savings VS. the OEM one's above??
Just curious.
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Old 04-28-2019, 09:14 PM
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^^^ They are 5$ for 8'. https://shop.advanceautoparts.com/p/...B&gclsrc=aw.ds
There is not reason to buy it from Acura. I did run lines before at pickup, it is not new to me. Actually I learned it from City of Minneapolis. I bought truck from them at auction. They run all fuel lines in PVF. I run brake lines in PVF.
This is from NAPA
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Surpassing all competitors as THE choice for both professionals and do-it-yourselfers when it comes to brake, fuel, and transmission line repair, Poly-Armour is different from anything else on the market due to its PVF or Poly-Vinyl Fluorine coat. This coating is actually a highly durable 'plastic' coating that is 'baked and cured' to the line. This provides extra protection from corrosion, debris, and road surfacing solutions. It also offers superior bend-ability without kinking. That makes Poly-Armour the easiest line to work with - period! Underneath the PVF-coating is a double-wall, low carbon steel, copper brazed tubing which meets all international and U.S. requirements for brake tubing. The difference being that Poly-Armour offers 30 times the corrosion resistance of galvanized steel alone. PVF-coated lines are now the standard in many vehicles on the road today including: Volkswagen/Audi, Honda, Toyota, and Mercedes. Considered a premium line, Poly-Armour should be used on any vehicle that will see any type of harsh environment including snow, road treatments, salt, air, dirt/gravel, etc. When extending the life of the lines is important, Poly-Armour should be used; such as on commercial vehicles or when exact OEM replacement is required or desired. - Poly-Armour is 30x More Resistant to Corrosion - DOT Approved for Hydraulic Brake Systems - Bends Easier than Standard Steel Tubing - Available in Coils of 25′ and 50′ - Finished Lines Available for Domestic & Import. Poly-Armour lines and tubing meet the following specifications: SAEJ527b, GM123M, SAEJ1290, DIN 74234

Product Features:
  • PVF-coated for 30x corrosion resistance
  • OEM preffered
  • Double-walled
  • Low-carbon steel
  • Easy bending
  • -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Last edited by bbsitum; 04-28-2019 at 09:19 PM.
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Old 04-28-2019, 10:08 PM
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The 'unit length' listed under 'Specifications' on the NAPA website you provided states '8 in.' (not 8 feet, is that an error??) at $5.95 each Adapter Brake Line; Part #: BK 8135511; Balkamp.

https://www.napaonline.com/en/p/BK_8135511
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Old 04-28-2019, 11:50 PM
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Sorry for mistake. I used it in past. Should be all together for both lines like 40$. Srs. All mechanic do same, use genetic lines.
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Old 04-29-2019, 06:01 PM
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^^^ 6' pvf brake line with 2 flare bolt at it is 10$. https://shop.advanceautoparts.com/p/...E&gclsrc=aw.ds
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Old 04-30-2019, 09:26 AM
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So why I insist at PVF coated lines? A few years go I bought Dorman "OEM" transmission fluid lines for my F250 99 for approximately 90$. It toke to lines only one winter to rust through.
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Old 04-30-2019, 10:20 AM
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Originally Posted by bbsitum View Post
So why I insist at PVF coated lines? A few years go I bought Dorman "OEM" transmission fluid lines for my F250 99 for approximately 90$. It toke to lines only one winter to rust through.
I'm all for using the latest technology and if PVF coated lines make you feel more secure, than by all means. With that said, it still took 17 years for your OEM lines to rust to the point that you want to replace them, just saying.

Good Luck!
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Old 05-01-2019, 06:50 AM
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I'll be doing this project soon myself. Personally, for sake of a few bucks, I'd rather get the single piece OEM lines that are bent precisely to fit. Fewer potential leak points, less PIA factor. Maybe I'm just getting lazy in my old age. My
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Old 05-01-2019, 07:29 AM
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Looking at the shape and length of the #6 line, I'd like to see the size/shape of that box from Acura.
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Old 05-01-2019, 07:40 AM
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^^^ Big problem to is how to fit it inside. How much I checked if you buy original fuel lines you would have to drop part of subframe to run lines. Would agree look like line #6 would be very difficult to fit. Again lost my believing in preformed lines after my Dorman transmission lines rusted in one year.
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Old 05-01-2019, 08:31 AM
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Zeta it is said across internet that is not possible double flare stainless steel lines. I'm thinking to double flare fuel lines somewhere behind fire wall but look at moment it would be impossible to flare them. Even those PVF lines as I understand can get damage to coating if use flaring tools at it.
https://www.google.com/search?source...10.EMZDGaMTWJ0
To make clear I plan to do double flare even at fuel line rather than this quick disconnect flare.
Another route for fuel lines are brake lines from NAPA and adapter from brake flare to to quick disconnect male flare.
https://www.amazon.com/EVIL-ENERGY-Disconnect-Fitting-Aluminum/dp/B07FKB255M/ref=pd_lpo_vtph_263_tr_t_2?_encoding=UTF8&psc=1&refRID=W404JT9XPFNXY0PVB2WF https://www.amazon.com/EVIL-ENERGY-Disconnect-Fitting-Aluminum/dp/B07FKB255M/ref=pd_lpo_vtph_263_tr_t_2?_encoding=UTF8&psc=1&refRID=W404JT9XPFNXY0PVB2WF
It is lot of this adapters out there. Would have to mach that AN or whatsoever. I'm truing to wrap my head around this all plumbing things at moment. Obviously I will have to do a lot of googling. I'm not even close to understand that all together.

Last edited by bbsitum; 05-01-2019 at 08:34 AM.
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Old 05-01-2019, 09:06 AM
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^^^ First link in above comment is wrong, should be this
How much I understand flaring fuel lines mean somehow add that ring approximately 1" from end of pipe and flaring brake line mean bend them out at end. In comment #2 in second photo that guys obviously know what they are doing. They went under Acura and try to fit brake lines. It is why they make joints rather than a single piece. My experience from running rear brake lines at my F250 is similar.

Last edited by bbsitum; 05-01-2019 at 09:16 AM.
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Old 05-01-2019, 11:07 AM
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If time permits, check out this guy. He does a lot of 'rusted lines' (fuel/brake) as a small town mechanic in upstate NY. You may be able to pick-up some pointers watching him perform the work utilizing the particular 'flare' tools in the videos, of which one looks like the same tool in your above video :




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Old 05-01-2019, 06:58 PM
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^^^ Yeah it is same tool. However at 7 min in my video in post #19 guy say even for that tool stainless is to hard. I do not think I will cut stainless and try to flare it under car. Will not work. So keep in mind that even some hydraulic flare tools will not work at stainless. Thanks to Eastwood to be honest about it.

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Old 05-01-2019, 08:07 PM
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Here some information about brake lines materials.
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Old 05-06-2019, 05:31 PM
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So even pro hotrodders struggle flaring SS brake lines even of the car. https://www.jalopyjournal.com/forum/...-woes.1068567/
TBH I do not believe that anyone at this forum successfully double flare SS on car. Was today at U pull and brought an acura flare nut from a car there so will know what I need. Quick connect fuel lines are really easy to dill with at acura.
Here another comment from pro hotrodder
"Double flare is for dead soft material, Most SS lines are 37* single flare "AN" fittings. SS tubeing is suseptable to work hardening and can/will crack at the reverse flare bend"
Wonder how is not a tread here at acurazine about flaring ss lines. It actually look like a rocket science.

Last edited by bbsitum; 05-06-2019 at 05:37 PM.
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Old 05-06-2019, 06:47 PM
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Well checked line from U pull. It is ss and double flared at 45 degree. However it do not mean we can do it with hand tools. Who know what tricks Japanese did in shop to do it.
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Old 05-06-2019, 11:27 PM
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Well after reading hotrodders forums I claim that none at acurazine ever double flared fuel lines.
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Old 05-07-2019, 07:55 AM
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So our fuel lines are 5/16 (8,38mm). But to use 5/16 already flared brake lines from NAPA for it I would need adapter from 5/16 quick connect male to flare female (or male) for 5/16 pipe. At internet the sell only from male quick disconnect to 6AN. 6AN is single flare at 37 degree of stainless steel.
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Old 05-07-2019, 06:38 PM
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Originally Posted by bbsitum View Post
So our fuel lines are 5/16 (8,38mm). But to use 5/16 already flared brake lines from NAPA for it I would need adapter from 5/16 quick connect male to flare female (or male) for 5/16 pipe. At internet the sell only from male quick disconnect to 6AN. 6AN is single flare at 37 degree of stainless steel.
Actually AN6 mean 6/16 ID of flare bolt. How much I googled. So basically that adapter go from 5/15 tube to 6/16 tube and no many of AN5 are made.

"When racers adopted AN plumbing, it soon became apparent that engineers in different industries did not work together much. Automotive designers had their own standards and accepted sizes, and some of those were not found in aircraft systems. One glaring mismatch is the popularity of 5/16" (8mm) fuel hose on automobiles. While a specification exists for 5AN hose and fittings, it is exceedingly rare in the aircraft industry. Even manufacturers specializing in AN-style fittings strictly for motorsports tend to skip over the 5AN size for the most part."

However

From Wikipedia --- "AN fittings are a flare fitting, using 37 flared tubing to form a metal-metal seal. They are similar to other 37 flared fittings, such as JIC, which is their industrial variant. The two are interchangeable in theory, though this is typically not recommended due to the exacting specifications and demands of the aerospace industry. The differences between them relate to thread class and shape (how tight a fit the threads are), and the metals used."
"Note that 37 AN and 45 SAE fittings and tooling are not interchangeable due to the different flaring angles. Mixing them can cause leakage at the flare."

Second link in post #18. It is said
"
  • Main Application: These 6an to 5/16 fuel rail fitting adapters are designed to fit your fuel feed outlet of efi fuel filter and fuel rails ."
Yeah in second photo in second link in comment #18 it said 37 degree. Not useful.

Last edited by bbsitum; 05-07-2019 at 06:49 PM.
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Old 05-08-2019, 08:44 PM
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So there is nowhere at planet (I googled it) to buy quick connect male to sae flare female nut adapter. It is tons of Quick disconnect to 6An (37 degree angle flare) but again nowhere at planet to find adapter from 6an to Sae flare (45 degree). I finally figured out why. So you are forced to buy expensive and poor quality "OEM" fuel and transmission lines. Lines similar to this for my pickup I bought like 5 years go https://shop.advanceautoparts.com/p/...E&gclsrc=aw.ds and they rusted in one winter. It happen because line are cheap, zinc plated mild steel. Man imagine that you can not buy at planet adapter from quick disconnect to flare 45 degree.
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Old 05-10-2019, 03:12 PM
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I can do AN fitting to SAE where I would cut fuel lines below fire wall.
. Some shop will manufacture quick connect to SAE adapter at another end. Talked with two shops about replacing brake and fuel lines to back - 1000$ or more.

Last edited by bbsitum; 05-10-2019 at 03:15 PM.
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