Notices

Rear main seal

 
Old 01-10-2019, 10:04 PM
  #1  
Registered Member
Thread Starter
 
whitetiger5's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Location: Newport beach
Age: 40
Posts: 238
Received 25 Likes on 24 Posts
Rear main seal

In the middle of swapping out my transmission for an AV6, and I canít convince myself to change the rear main seal. Itís not leaking and because itís so deep in the engine, Iíd rather take the approach of ďit it ainít broke donít fix itĒ in this particular case.

A few few things that concern me:

1. Do I need to remove the oil pan to do it?

2. On a scale of 1-10 how challenging is it to get a good seal with the HondaBond gasket? For reference Iíve already taken the transmission out, I consider that a 10 😉

3. Any way to check that Iíve done it right and the job will last other than puttting EVERYTHING back together again and starting the engine?

I have the seal and HondaBond as I was expecting it to be in need of a change AND this car is no longer my daily driver, so it pretty much comes down to getting some answers to these questions/concerns.

whitetiger5 is offline  
Old 01-10-2019, 10:57 PM
  #2  
Registered Member
 
Iggy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2001
Location: Southern N.H.
Posts: 1,402
Received 121 Likes on 103 Posts
With the trans off, the rear main seal is super easy. Remove the flex plate and the seal is fully exposed. Just pop it out and insert the new one, then torque the flex plate back in. No hondabond needed.
Iggy is offline  
Old 01-11-2019, 12:50 AM
  #3  
Registered Member
Thread Starter
 
whitetiger5's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Location: Newport beach
Age: 40
Posts: 238
Received 25 Likes on 24 Posts
Did you remove the aluminum ďcaseĒ assembly in order to do the that? I read in the service manual that the seal can be installed with the case plate installed on the back end of the block, but did not see any mention of how to remove it.

I would imagine that installing it without removing the case plate would be the safest route as it would not disrupt the factory sealing of that plate which I am sure many have had problems with as it requires cleaning off all residual gasket material and cleaning it pristinely such that the new gasket works. A task thatís probably very difficult with the oil pan still intact and lots of oil, grease and grime sitting around from the engine being used.
whitetiger5 is offline  
Old 01-11-2019, 01:40 AM
  #4  
WTF?
 
Midnight Mystery's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2016
Location: Mississippi Coast (But not for much longer)
Age: 22
Posts: 5,336
Received 312 Likes on 279 Posts
Dude, you're right there already, 1/10 more effort and you're done.


Ask yourself, do I want to pull all that crap apart again in a few months when it really does start leaking?
Midnight Mystery is online now  
Old 01-11-2019, 02:05 AM
  #5  
Registered Member
Thread Starter
 
whitetiger5's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Location: Newport beach
Age: 40
Posts: 238
Received 25 Likes on 24 Posts
Thatís the issue: the service manual states that in order to remove the seal, the seal housing must be removed. Then, the oil pan should come off so that sealing of the seal housing (which mates against the block on one side and the top of the oil pan on an other edge ) must be removed and reinstalled as well. I presume to clean and decontaminate the entire surface where Honda bond will be applied, so that it may properly adhere?

Anyhow, taking off both of those parts does not seem like 1/10 more work, maybe another 1/3 of the job.

If itís possible to remove / install the seal without all that additional work to the housing / oil pan; Iíd like to know!
whitetiger5 is offline  
Old 01-11-2019, 02:13 AM
  #6  
WTF?
 
Midnight Mystery's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2016
Location: Mississippi Coast (But not for much longer)
Age: 22
Posts: 5,336
Received 312 Likes on 279 Posts
Midnight Mystery is online now  
Old 01-11-2019, 03:18 PM
  #7  
Registered Member
 
MBP 03's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Location: New Jersey
Age: 46
Posts: 326
Received 64 Likes on 57 Posts
It's exactly like Iggy said. The flex plate comes off, the old rear main seal is removed and the new one is tapped in place. No other parts need to be removed from the engine.

With the trans out of the car, it's a no brainer to replace the rear main seal for peace of mind.
MBP 03 is offline  
Old 01-11-2019, 04:10 PM
  #8  
Registered Member
Thread Starter
 
whitetiger5's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Location: Newport beach
Age: 40
Posts: 238
Received 25 Likes on 24 Posts
Thanks, after researching it a bit further, I can see why some remove the seal housing to reduce risk of scratching the crankshaft.

Specifically, what tool did you use to remove the seal?
whitetiger5 is offline  
Old 01-12-2019, 10:28 AM
  #9  
Registered Member
 
MBP 03's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Location: New Jersey
Age: 46
Posts: 326
Received 64 Likes on 57 Posts
I drilled a small pilot hole into the rear main seal and then screwed in by hand a 1" long screw just far enough to engage the metal in the seal. Then, I pulled on the screw with pliers to remove the seal.
MBP 03 is offline  
Old 01-12-2019, 07:21 PM
  #10  
Registered Member
 
Iggy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2001
Location: Southern N.H.
Posts: 1,402
Received 121 Likes on 103 Posts
Thumbs up

Originally Posted by MBP 03 View Post
I drilled a small pilot hole into the rear main seal and then screwed in by hand a 1" long screw just far enough to engage the metal in the seal. Then, I pulled on the screw with pliers to remove the seal.
That's about as good a method as any
Iggy is offline  
Old 01-13-2019, 12:54 PM
  #11  
Registered Member
Thread Starter
 
whitetiger5's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Location: Newport beach
Age: 40
Posts: 238
Received 25 Likes on 24 Posts
Thanks!

I decided that that my hand eye coordination might not be the best in this case and didnít want to risk drilling, punching or scratching anything in this area so I put together the following to pluck the seal right out :
  1. paint can opener
  2. electrical tape to insulate the metal at the tip of the can opener
  3. long handled ratchet (3/8 drive in this case)
  4. a DEEP socket that is large enough to fit over the the inserted dowel pin (the pin that helps guide with mating the transmission together with the engine)







At a location between the crank/seal and one of the dowel pins: Insert the tip of the can opener between the crankshaft and the seal with the hook portion facing out so that it grabs the seal when the opener is pulled out.

I noticed that the above is not easy to do without a little bit of leverage; thatís where the ratchet and socket come in.

Insert the rachet through the can opener, with the socket end over the dowel pin (to avoid that end from sliding). Holding one side of the rachet over the dowel pin, and lifting up on the other end of the ratchet will allow the seal to pop right off with surprisingly little effort.


Note: itís important that a deep socket is used so that the handle of the opener stays in an orientation that is straight out and away (the direction you want the seal to go). And doesnít slide down forward the socket side of the ratchet.



whitetiger5 is offline  
Old 01-14-2019, 05:12 PM
  #12  
Registered Member
 
Iggy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2001
Location: Southern N.H.
Posts: 1,402
Received 121 Likes on 103 Posts
Perfecto!
Iggy is offline  
 
Related Topics
Thread
Thread Starter
Forum
Replies
Last Post
JEFF88
2G CL Problems & Fixes
6
07-12-2006 07:55 AM
Allout
Second Generation CL Discussion (2000-2003)
23
02-15-2006 10:25 PM
DeezNutz
Second Generation CL Discussion (2000-2003)
1
09-15-2005 01:44 PM
Chemmech
Second Generation CL Discussion (2000-2003)
5
04-17-2005 11:07 AM
zeta
Second Generation CL Discussion (2000-2003)
21
07-31-2004 02:17 PM


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Quick Reply: Rear main seal


Contact Us - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service

© 2019 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands

We are a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for us to earn fees by linking to Amazon.com and affiliated sites.