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Old 04-05-2019, 03:25 PM
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Crazy stuff that's hard to believe really happened

So what if you learned that medicine in Europe for several HUNDRED years involved consuming human body parts? From dead bodies, freshly executed bodies, you name it.


The Gruesome History of Eating Corpses as Medicine

The question was not “Should you eat human flesh?” says one historian, but, “What sort of flesh should you eat?”




Egyptians embalming a corpse. (Bettmann / Corbis)

By Maria DolanSMITHSONIAN.COM
MAY 6, 2012
8.1K86201511.7KThe last line of a 17th century poem by John Donne prompted Louise Noble’s quest. “Women,” the line read, are not only “Sweetness and wit,” but “mummy, possessed.”Sweetness and wit, sure. But mummy? In her search for an explanation, Noble, a lecturer of English at the University of New England in Australia, made a surprising discovery: That word recurs throughout the literature of early modern Europe, from Donne’s “Love’s Alchemy” to Shakespeare’s “Othello” and Edmund Spenser’s “The Faerie Queene,” because mummies and other preserved and fresh human remains were a common ingredient in the medicine of that time. In short: Not long ago, Europeans were cannibals.

Noble’s new book, Medicinal Cannibalism in Early Modern English Literature and Culture, and another by Richard Sugg of England’s University of Durham, Mummies, Cannibals and Vampires: The History of Corpse Medicine from the Renaissance to the Victorians, reveal that for several hundred years, peaking in the 16th and 17th centuries, many Europeans, including royalty, priests and scientists, routinely ingested remedies containing human bones, blood and fat as medicine for everything from headaches to epilepsy. There were few vocal opponents of the practice, even though cannibalism in the newly explored Americas was reviled as a mark of savagery. Mummies were stolen from Egyptian tombs, and skulls were taken from Irish burial sites. Gravediggers robbed and sold body parts.

“The question was not, ‘Should you eat human flesh?’ but, ‘What sort of flesh should you eat?’ ” says Sugg. The answer, at first, was Egyptian mummy, which was crumbled into tinctures to stanch internal bleeding. But other parts of the body soon followed. Skull was one common ingredient, taken in powdered form to cure head ailments. Thomas Willis, a 17th-century pioneer of brain science, brewed a drink for apoplexy, or bleeding, that mingled powdered human skull and chocolate. And King Charles II of England sipped “The King’s Drops,” his personal tincture, containing human skull in alcohol. Even the toupee of moss that grew over a buried skull, called Usnea, became a prized additive, its powder believed to cure nosebleeds and possibly epilepsy. Human fat was used to treat the outside of the body. German doctors, for instance, prescribed bandages soaked in it for wounds, and rubbing fat into the skin was considered a remedy for gout.

Blood was procured as fresh as possible, while it was still thought to contain the vitality of the body. This requirement made it challenging to acquire. The 16th century German-Swiss physician Paracelsus believed blood was good for drinking, and one of his followers even suggested taking blood from a living body. While that doesn’t seem to have been common practice, the poor, who couldn’t always afford the processed compounds sold in apothecaries, could gain the benefits of cannibal medicine by standing by at executions, paying a small amount for a cup of the still-warm blood of the condemned. “The executioner was considered a big healer in Germanic countries,” says Sugg. “He was a social leper with almost magical powers.” For those who preferred their blood cooked, a 1679 recipe from a Franciscan apothecary describes how to make it into marmalade.

Rub fat on an ache, and it might ease your pain. Push powdered moss up your nose, and your nosebleed will stop. If you can afford the King’s Drops, the float of alcohol probably helps you forget you’re depressed—at least temporarily. In other words, these medicines may have been incidentally helpful—even though they worked by magical thinking, one more clumsy search for answers to the question of how to treat ailments at a time when even the circulation of blood was not yet understood.

However, consuming human remains fit with the leading medical theories of the day. “It emerged from homeopathic ideas,” says Noble. “It’s 'like cures like.' So you eat ground-up skull for pains in the head.” Or drink blood for diseases of the blood.

Another reason human remains were considered potent was because they were thought to contain the spirit of the body from which they were taken. “Spirit” was considered a very real part of physiology, linking the body and the soul. In this context, blood was especially powerful. “They thought the blood carried the soul, and did so in the form of vaporous spirits,” says Sugg. The freshest blood was considered the most robust. Sometimes the blood of young men was preferred, sometimes, that of virginal young women. By ingesting corpse materials, one gains the strength of the person consumed. Noble quotes Leonardo da Vinci on the matter: “We preserve our life with the death of others. In a dead thing insensate life remains which, when it is reunited with the stomachs of the living, regains sensitive and intellectual life.”

Egyptians embalming a corpse. (Bettmann / Corbis)
The idea also wasn’t new to the Renaissance, just newly popular. Romans drank the blood of slain gladiators to absorb the vitality of strong young men. Fifteenth-century philosopher Marsilio Ficino suggested drinking blood from the arm of a young person for similar reasons. Many healers in other cultures, including in ancient Mesopotamia and India, believed in the usefulness of human body parts, Noble writes.

Even at corpse medicine’s peak, two groups were demonized for related behaviors that were considered savage and cannibalistic. One was Catholics, whom Protestants condemned for their belief in transubstantiation, that is, that the bread and wine taken during Holy Communion were, through God’s power, changed into the body and blood of Christ. The other group was Native Americans; negative stereotypes about them were justified by the suggestion that these groups practiced cannibalism. “It looks like sheer hypocrisy,” says Beth A. Conklin, a cultural and medical anthropologist at Vanderbilt University who has studied and written about cannibalism in the Americas. People of the time knew that corpse medicine was made from human remains, but through some mental transubstantiation of their own, those consumers refused to see the cannibalistic implications of their own practices.

Conklin finds a distinct difference between European corpse medicine and the New World cannibalism she has studied. “The one thing that we know is that almost all non-Western cannibal practice is deeply social in the sense that the relationship between the eater and the one who is eaten matters,” says Conklin. “In the European process, this was largely erased and made irrelevant. Human beings were reduced to simple biological matter equivalent to any other kind of commodity medicine.”

The hypocrisy was not entirely missed. In Michel de Montaigne’s 16th century essay “On the Cannibals,” for instance, he writes of cannibalism in Brazil as no worse than Europe’s medicinal version, and compares both favorably to the savage massacres of religious wars.

As science strode forward, however, cannibal remedies died out. The practice dwindled in the 18th century, around the time Europeans began regularly using forks for eating and soap for bathing. But Sugg found some late examples of corpse medicine: In 1847, an Englishman was advised to mix the skull of a young woman with treacle (molasses) and feed it to his daughter to cure her epilepsy. (He obtained the compound and administered it, as Sugg writes, but “allegedly without effect.”) A belief that a magical candle made from human fat, called a “thieves candle,” could stupefy and paralyze a person lasted into the 1880s. Mummy was sold as medicine in a German medical catalog at the beginning of the 20th century. And in 1908, a last known attempt was made in Germany to swallow blood at the scaffold.

This is not to say that we have moved on from using one human body to heal another. Blood transfusions, organ transplants and skin grafts are all examples of a modern form of medicine from the body. At their best, these practices are just as rich in poetic possibility as the mummies found in Donne and Shakespeare, as blood and body parts are given freely from one human to another. But Noble points to their darker incarnation, the global black market trade in body parts for transplants. Her book cites news reports on the theft of organs of prisoners executed in China, and, closer to home, of a body-snatching ring in New York City that stole and sold body parts from the dead to medical companies. It’s a disturbing echo of the past. Says Noble, “It’s that idea that once a body is dead you can do what you want with it.”
https://www.smithsonianmag.com/histo...2I3sGzP4_m4YhI


What other crazy shit that actually happened that you know of?
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Old 04-05-2019, 03:32 PM
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Someone once told me Whitney Houston died, but I just couldn't believe them.
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Old 04-05-2019, 03:37 PM
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Originally Posted by oo7spy View Post
Someone once told me Whitney Houston died, but I just couldn't believe them.
I came home last week to my wife watching a documentary on that. They were showing CNN breaking the news. I gasped and said “No way! Whitney Houston died????”

She did not understand the humor.
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Old 04-08-2019, 09:13 AM
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Originally Posted by svtmike View Post
I came home last week to my wife watching a documentary on that. They were showing CNN breaking the news. I gasped and said “No way! Whitney Houston died????”

She did not understand the humor.


Wait.... What? Not Whitney!?

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Old 04-08-2019, 09:37 AM
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Old 04-08-2019, 10:55 AM
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Crazier things have happened....
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Old 04-08-2019, 11:22 AM
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I thought this was going to be a Floriduh thread..
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Old 04-08-2019, 11:36 AM
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The fastest projectile ever created- 125,000 mph:
Operation Plumbbob was conducted at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) from May through October of 1957. It was the sixth test series at NTS and consisted of 29 tests. Six of these were safety tests, and two did not produce any nuclear yield. This series addressed several objectives, including tactical weapon proof tests, safety tests, and component and mockup testing for thermonuclear systems to be detonated in Hardtack I, among other things.

The Pascal-A test occupies a significant place in the history of nuclear testing since it was the first test to be that could be called a contained underground test.

Pascal-A (originally named Galileo-A) was a one-point safety test, an attempt to verify a primary design that would have a small maximum energy release if accidentally detonated. Accidental detonations can only initiate the detonation at one location instead of the multi-point initiation of a deliberately fired multi-detonator system, hence the concept of the "one point safe" criterion. Even as planned, Pascal-A was unsafe by current safety standards since a nuclear yield of 1-2 lb was expected, compared to current standards of zero yield. But for safety sake, they tested the device near the bottom of a deep open shaft. This was the first US nuclear test to be conducted in an underground shaft, and thus qualifies as the beginning of US underground nuclear testing.

As it happened the test yield was about 50,000 times greater than expected and created a sizable explosion, catching everyone off guard. Official listings of the yield for this shot still describe it only as "slight", even though every other test in Plumbbob has a specific yield published. It is possible to calculate the yield though from normalization data given in UCRL-53152 Part 6 Results of Calculations of External Gamma Radiation Exposure Rates from Fallout and the Related Radionuclide Compositions; Operation Plumbbob, 1957 (by Harry G. Hicks, July 1981). This report provides comparative test product information, and if Pascal-A is compared with other low yield (and thus pure fission) tests, a consistent value of 55 tons is obtained.

Physicist and test director Robert Campbell and Astrophysicist Robert Brownlee provide a first hand accounts of this test in Caging the Dragon: The Containment of Underground Nuclear Explosions (DOE/NV-388, 1997).



Campbell: The first thing we at LASL did in a hole was called Pasal-A. It was 500 feet deep, in a cased hole. We put the bomb at the bottom of it, and we didn't stem it. So, we fired it. Biggest damn Roman candle you ever saw! It was beautiful. Big blue glow in the sky...
Bill Ogle was out there, in that timing station. When he saw that thing come out of the ground he knew he couldn't come south the way he came or he'd get into trouble... He was really excited about how they were going to get back... They were damn lucky they didn't go right through that cloud.
Carothers: Why didn't you stem it?
Campbell: Didn't need to. We did have a lid on that hole. Nobody's seen it since. We never did find that. On that lid was one of Johnny Malik's detectors, and we wanted a line of sight to see if we could measure some reactions. There was a kind of plug in the hole. It was a couple of hundred feet off the bottom, as I remember. All it was, was a concrete cylinder with a hole through the center of it, so the detector could look through it. And it had an annulus, so it wouldn't bind anywhere going down. It was suspended from the harness that was holding the bomb. It was a collimator, not a plug that was supposed to stem the hole. We never found that collimator either, and it was about five feet thick.
...
But anyhow, bad as it was, spectacular as it was, there was only a tenth of the radiation on the ground around there that there would have been if it had been done on the surface.
...
Bob Brownlee: ... Pascal-B and Pascal-C had plugs, but Pascal-A did not, although it had a concrete collimator in it for the detector on the surface. The guys had been working trying to get it ready, but there had been a number of troubles. They finally got it down the hole, by my recollection, about ten o'clock or so at night. There wasn't much time to go back to Mercury, go to bed, and get up the next morning to shoot it, so somebody said, "Why don't we just shoot it now, and then go in?" And it was the world's finest Roman candle, because at night it was all visible. Blue fire shot hundreds of feet in the air. Everybody was down in the area, and they all jumped in their cars and drove like crazy, not even counting who was there and who came out of the area.
Pascal-B is an interesting footnote to the history of nuclear testing, and surprisingly - spaceflight.

The Pascal-B (originally named Galileo-B) was a near duplicate of the Pascal-A shot. It was another one-point criticality safety test, of the same basic primary stage design. Like Pascal-A it was fired in an open (unstemmed) shaft. One significant difference was that it had a concrete plug, similar to the concrete collimator used in Pacscal-A, but this time it was placed just above the device at the bottom of the shaft.

The close proximity of this plug to the bomb had an unanticipated side effect.

Objects can only be propelled to very high velocities by a nuclear explosion if they are located close to the burst point. Once a nuclear fireball has grown to a radius that is similar in size to the radius of a quantity of high explosive of similar yield, its energy density is about the same and very high velocities would not be produced. This radius for a 300 ton explosion is 3.5 meters.

The steel plate at the top of the shaft was over 150 m from the nuclear device, much too far for it to be propelled to extreme velocity directly by the explosion. The feature of Pascal-B that made this possible was the placement of the collimator close to the device. The mass of the collimator cylinder was at least 2 tonnes (if solid) and would have been vaporized by the explosion, turning it into a mass of superheated gas that expanded and accelerated up the shaft, turning it into a giant gun. It was the hypersonic expanding column of vaporized concrete striking the cover plate that propelled it off the shaft at high velocity.

To illustrate the physics, and estimate how fast it might have been going, consider that if the collimator absorbed a substantial part of the explosion energy (say a third of it, or 100 tons) it would have been heated to temperatures far higher than any conventional explosive (by a factor of 50 with the previous assumption).

The maximum velocity achieved by an expanding gas is determined by the equation: u = 2c/(gamma - 1), where u is the final velocity, c is the speed of sound in the gas, and gamma is the specific heat ratio of the gas. If we further assume that the thermodynamic properties of vaporized concrete are similar to the hot combustion gases of high explosives, then the speed of sound in the vaporized collimator would be about 7 km/sec (the square root of 50 times the value of c for an explosive combustion gases, which is 1 km/sec). For molecular gases gamma is usually in the range of 1.1 to 1.5, for explosives it is 1.25. Thus we get:
u = 2*7 km/sec / (1.25 - 1) = 56 km/sec.

This is about five times Earth's 11.2 km/sec escape velocity, quite close to the figure of six times arrived at by Dr. Brownlee in his detailed computations.


Space rockets top out around 35,000 mph.
https://nuclearweaponarchive.org/Usa/Tests/Plumbob.html

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Old 04-08-2019, 03:02 PM
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Originally Posted by thoiboi View Post
I thought this was going to be a Floriduh thread..
Not really unbelievable but hard-to-believe-dumb.

A man was arrested in Florida for allegedly breaking into cars in the jail parking lot moments after he was released, according to police.

Michael Casey Lewis, 37, was originally arrested on charges of grand theft Thursday morning, the St. Lucie County Sheriff's Department said in a statement.

Lewis had just bonded out of county jail and been released Thursday when deputies said they spotted him behaving suspiciously.

“After being released, deputies in the parking lot of the jail observed Lewis pulling car door handles and learned he had just burglarized several cars right there at the jail,” the statement said.

Surveillance video captured Lewis briefly getting into a silver vehicle and then walking around the rest of the parking lot looking into cars and checking to see whether they were unlocked, according to his arrest affidavit.

One officer approached Lewis, who said he was "waiting for his girlfriend" to pick him up, the affidavit said. The officer noticed he had cigarettes and cash, which is unusual for someone who's just been released from jail.

Another officer confronted Lewis after seeing the surveillance video, and the suspect handed him a brown paper bag he'd taken from a car filled with cigarettes, a debit card, a Florida driver's license and $547 in cash, police said. Lewis had also taken an iPhone 7 worth approximately $1,000, according to the owner who told police she'd accidentally left her car unlocked.

Lewis was then “rebooked” at the jail on additional burglary charges and released again with a bond of $11,250.
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Old 04-08-2019, 03:45 PM
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Originally Posted by thoiboi View Post
I thought this was going to be a Floriduh thread..
Here you go

https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/...ve/3388358002/

Record-setting 17-foot long python found near Florida Everglades. It was carrying 73 eggs

April 8, 2019

A national preserve in South Florida has reported catching a python that was more than 17 feet long and weighed 140 pounds.



The female reptile is the largest ever caught at Big Cypress National Preserve, according to a Friday social media post by the preserve. It was carrying 73 developing eggs at the time.

An August report from Smithsonian Magazine says an invasive Burmese python hybrid can now be found across more than 1,000 square miles of South Florida. The snakes –which can grow to 23 feet in length and weigh 200 pounds – are causing major ecological problems in the area, the publication reports.

The Big Cypress snake was caught using new tracking technology, the national preserve said in a social media post. Authorities used radio transmitters to track male pythons; the males' locations are then used to find breeding females.

"The team not only removes the invasive snakes, but collects data for research, develop new removal tools, and learn how the pythons are using the Preserve," a social media post about the removal says. "The team tracked one of the sentinel males with the transmitter and found this massive female nearby."
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Old 04-09-2019, 08:51 AM
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Originally Posted by oo7spy View Post
Not really unbelievable but hard-to-believe-dumb.
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Old 04-10-2019, 12:43 PM
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She went to the hospital for an infection. Doctors found four bees living in her eye, eating her tears. ....
https://www.washingtonpost.com/natio...=.8cf5998576e9

https://www.cnn.com/2019/04/10/asia/...ntl/index.html
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Old 04-10-2019, 01:37 PM
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This thread.
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Old 04-10-2019, 02:37 PM
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A US woman who died at 99 of natural causes unknowingly lived with her organs on the wrong side of her body due to a rare congenital condition.
https://www.bbc.com/news/world-us-canada-47871888
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Old 04-11-2019, 02:21 PM
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I read about that!

On an early spring day in 2018, the faint smell of formaldehyde floating in the air, 26-year-old medical student Warren Nielsen and four of his classmates prepped a cadaver in the chilly dissection lab at Oregon Health and Science University in Portland.
Similar groups of five gathered around bodies on the other 15 tables in the anatomy class, all eager to explore the mysteries of the human body they had seen only in textbooks.The cadaver assigned to Nielsen's team was a 99-year-old woman who had died of natural causes. Her name was Rose Marie Bentley, but the students didn't know that then. To honor and respect the privacy of those who offer their bodies to science, no further details are given medical students about the person who had once inhabited the body lying on the silvery slab before them.But as the students and their professors were soon to find out, Bentley was special, so special she deserved her own unique spot in medical literature and history books.The reason? A condition called situs inversus with levocardia, in which most vital organs are reversed -- almost like a mirror inside the body. That, along with a host of other weird but wonderful abnormalities, made Bentley a sort of medical unicorn."I think the odds of finding another person like her may be as remote as one in 50 million," said assistant professor Cameron Walker, who teaches the Foundations of Clinical Anatomy class at Oregon Health and Science University. "I don't think any of us will ever forget it, honestly."

'This is totally backwards'

On this March day, the assignment was to open the body's chest cavity to examine the heart. It wasn't long before Nielsen's group began to question their fledgling medical knowledge."Her heart was missing a large vein that's normally on the right side," Nielsen said.Bewildered, he and his team called the professors over and asked: "Where's the inferior vena cava? Are we missing it? Are we crazy?""And they kind of rolled their eyes," Nielsen said, "Like, 'how can these students miss this big vessel?' And they come over and that's when the hubbub starts. They're like 'Oh, my God, this is totally backwards!' "
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Old 04-12-2019, 08:25 AM
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Trump was elected President
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Old 04-12-2019, 07:11 PM
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Trump was elected President
Originally Posted by leedogg View Post
I read about that!
.
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Old 04-15-2019, 02:07 PM
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Had to double-check my browser address to make sure I wasn't on Reddit
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Old 04-23-2019, 01:50 PM
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The question was not “Should you eat human flesh?” says one historian, but, “What sort of flesh should you eat?”
The ass

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Old 04-23-2019, 05:01 PM
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With a spoon or with a fork like a salad?

Any dressings or jelly?
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