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Old 03-25-2015, 07:56 AM   #1
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Blue Lives Matter Too

Officers killed in San Jose, Wisconsin - CNN.com

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(CNN)Two law enforcement officers, one in Wisconsin and another in California, were shot and killed responding to incidents Tuesday.

The suspect in the Fond du Loc, Wisconsin, incident died. The suspect in the San Jose shooting was found dead on his balcony with a gunshot wound, authorities said.

It's unclear whether the suspects were fatally shot or died of self-inflicted gunshot wounds.

San Jose Police Officer Michael Johnson was killed while responding to a report of a man threatening to kill himself, the city police department said.

The incident started when police got a call Tuesday evening about a "despondent, intoxicated man, who possibly had access to a weapon, including a rifle," said San Jose Police Chief Larry Esquivel.

When officers arrived at the scene, gunfire erupted, Esquivel said.

It is not known whether the suspect was wounded in the exchange of gunfire, the police chief said.

Johnson was a 12-year veteran.

"SJPD grieves as we offer our condolences to the family of our brother," the police department tweeted.

In Wisconsin, a state trooper was killed during an attempted bank robbery in Fond du Lac, authorities said. The name of the fallen trooper has not yet been disclosed.

Gunfire rang out when the trooper was pursuing a car that matched the description of one used in a bank robbery, CNN affiliate WITI reported.

There was an exchange of gunfire, which led to the trooper's death. The suspect also died.

Authorities are not looking for any additional suspects.

The Wisconsin Department of Justice's Division of Criminal Investigation will conduct an investigation, a requirement for officer-involved shootings in the state.

The number of law enforcement officers shot to death in the line of duty rose more than 50% last year, according to Washington-based National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial Fund.

Many of those shootings occurred during police interactions with suspects such as traffic stops, responses to disturbances or attempted arrests.
Can a mod add "too" to the title of the thread? That better reflects my thoughts.
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Old 03-25-2015, 08:19 AM   #2
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Thanks Al Sharpton! And Stunna....
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Old 03-25-2015, 08:43 AM   #3
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Inb4 chromie states it's not illegal to kill cops and refers us to cop killing defense attorney
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Old 03-25-2015, 08:46 AM   #4
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So I don't blame the black community, or Al Sharpton for these stories not being protested. I actually blame the powers that be that run these media outlets who decide which stories are blasted 24/7. The "producers" hear about stuff like cops getting killed and quickly push them off to the side. Instead they're looking for stories that will enrage people, and possibly cause them to riot. Its always the usual, black guy gets shot by police, or missing white girl, etc. They should be ashamed of themselves.
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Old 03-25-2015, 08:56 AM   #5
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So I don't blame the black community, or Al Sharpton for these stories not being protested. I actually blame the powers that be that run these media outlets who decide which stories are blasted 24/7. The "producers" hear about stuff like cops getting killed and quickly push them off to the side. Instead they're looking for stories that will enrage people, and possibly cause them to riot. Its always the usual, black guy gets shot by police, or missing white girl, etc. They should be ashamed of themselves.
Another part of that coin is the people willing to go on TV and make an ass of themselves. It's usually not the officer's family. I always shake my head when I see close family of someone killed on the news not a couple hours later making a spectacle of themselves.
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Old 03-25-2015, 09:53 AM   #6
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Old 03-25-2015, 10:00 AM   #7
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The 50% increase in the number of cops killed on the job in one year is pretty staggering.
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Old 03-25-2015, 10:17 AM   #8
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^ That's pretty crazy but will not go widely reported (or get much air time) as it does not fit the media's agenda.

Either way
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Old 03-25-2015, 12:18 PM   #9
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Originally Posted by UA6 View Post
Instead they're looking for stories that will enrage people, and possibly cause them to riot.
I think it is a bit over the top (paranoiac?) to think that producers want riots. Even the idea of wanting to enrage people seems far-fetched. Producers care about clicks and ratings. Emotions and passion drive the majority of those ratings, so they focus on things that people are passionate about. I think the fact that anger and riots result is more coincidence than intention.

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The 50% increase in the number of cops killed on the job in one year is pretty staggering.
I in no way condone, dismiss, or justify LEO homocides, but "staggering" may be a bit of media hyperbole. From the website of the quoted source:
Quote:
Originally Posted by National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial Fund
Firearms-related incidents were the leading cause of death among law enforcement officers in 2014. Firearms-related fatalities accounted for 50 deaths, increasing 56 percent from 2013 when 32 officers were killed.



http://www.nleomf.org/facts/research-bulletins/
Saying the number of officer deaths due to firearms increased by 18 doesn't have the same passionate appeal as a 56% increase. It also doesn't shed any light into the number caused by criminals versus friendly fire. You may note that 2014 accounted for either the 2nd or 3rd lowest LEO death total on record.

Again, not dismissing anything; just trying to keep our wits about us.


Last edited by oo7spy; 03-25-2015 at 12:21 PM.
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Old 03-25-2015, 12:23 PM   #10
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Originally Posted by svtmike View Post
The 50% increase in the number of cops killed on the job in one year is pretty staggering.

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Originally Posted by juniorbean View Post
^ That's pretty crazy but will not go widely reported (or get much air time) as it does not fit the media's agenda.
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Old 03-25-2015, 12:30 PM   #11
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Sad day...
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Old 03-25-2015, 12:51 PM   #12
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Old 03-25-2015, 12:53 PM   #13
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Originally Posted by oo7spy View Post
Again, not dismissing anything; just trying to keep our wits about us.

Thanks for filling in the picture 007. That's good information.
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Old 03-25-2015, 01:01 PM   #14
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It's always been the case that more officers die in traffic accidents than by gunfire, mainly due to the type and duration of their driving.

Believe it or not, body armor has saved a lot of officers' lives in traffic accidents.
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Old 03-25-2015, 01:49 PM   #15
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^ I had never really considered the different means by which LEOs face danger before looking at that chart. It took a second for the 2001 data point to make sense, and then I was like, .

Any s know what's up with '74?
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Old 03-25-2015, 01:51 PM   #16
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Interesting regarding body armor.

Level III? Or IV?
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Old 03-25-2015, 01:54 PM   #17
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If you want a sobering look at how officers die, take a look at www.officerdown.org.
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Old 03-25-2015, 01:54 PM   #18
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Any s know what's up with '74?
My guess -- as you see the steady increase from '65 to '74 -- was the clashes between police and the activist movements of the time (anti-war, civil rights).

Those were my first years on the planet so you'd have to be really OG to have a solid memory of them.
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Old 03-25-2015, 02:04 PM   #19
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Interesting regarding body armor.

Level III? Or IV?
III. The trauma plate alone disperses a lot of impact.
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Old 03-25-2015, 03:34 PM   #20
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III. The trauma plate alone disperses a lot of impact.
Interesting, makes sense. I was thinking more along the lines of preventing impalement.
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Old 03-25-2015, 04:39 PM   #21
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Interesting, makes sense. I was thinking more along the lines of preventing impalement.
This quote, along with your avatar, are gold.


to the Officers. My wife's family knew the SJ officer. Sad freaking day.
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Old 03-26-2015, 11:16 AM   #22
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Nebraska state Sen. Ernie Chambers is facing backlash for comments he made Friday during a legislative hearing on a concealed gun bill, in which he compared the police to the Islamic State terrorist group.

“My ISIS is the police,” the 77-year-old independent said, Watchdog.org reported. “The police are licensed to kill us — children, old people.

“I wouldn’t go to Syria, I wouldn’t go to Iraq, I wouldn’t go to Afghanistan, I wouldn’t go to Yemen, I wouldn’t go to Tunisia, I wouldn’t go to Lebanon, I wouldn’t go to Jordan, I would do it right here. Nobody from ISIS ever terrorized us as a people as the police do daily,” Mr. Chambers said.

“If I was going to carry a weapon, it wouldn’t be against you, it wouldn’t be against these people who come here that I might have a dispute with. Mine would be for the police. And if I carried a gun I’d want to shoot him first and then ask questions later, like they say the cop ought to do,” he said, Watchdog.org reported.

Read more: Ernie Chambers, Nebraska state senator: 'My ISIS is the police' - Washington Times
Follow us: @washtimes on Twitter
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Old 03-26-2015, 01:50 PM   #23
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Now that I looked up the numbers for officer deaths in the line of duty, I am interested in how the numbers of casualties caused by officers on duty compares. Part of me thinks it doesn't belong in this thread though.
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Old 03-26-2015, 01:53 PM   #24
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Now that I looked up the numbers for officer deaths in the line of duty, I am interested in how the numbers of casualties caused by officers on duty compares. Part of me thinks it doesn't belong in this thread though.
Compares how? What possible correlation are you hypothesizing?

You would need to break it down to deaths by (1)Use of Force, (2)Vehicular Accidents, (3)Other and truthfully, there is no real accounting of this specific data anywhere. The FBI tracks police shootings as voluntarily reported (outside the standard FBI homicide crime stats) but many agencies (even some large ones like the NYPD) opt out so the numbers can be misleading. Also, death by other use of force is not really accounted for in the crime stats as being police involved.

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Old 03-26-2015, 01:58 PM   #25
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There wouldn't be any correlation that I can think of. I was just wondering how the numbers compare over time.

The data I provided suggests (in my amateur opinion) that police protection has improved greatly since the '80s. Whatever the data on police caused casualties shows will (likely) suggest something completely different.
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Old 03-26-2015, 02:07 PM   #26
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Originally Posted by oo7spy View Post
There wouldn't be any correlation that I can think of. I was just wondering how the numbers compare over time.

The data I provided suggests (in my amateur opinion) that police protection has improved greatly since the '80s. Whatever the data on police caused casualties shows will (likely) suggest something completely different.
Just didn't know where you were going with that.

Body armor is probably the most significant advancement in protection of individual officers. Early 80's was when they started to appear in LE but really took off in the 90's when they became lighter and more flexible. There are thousands of officers still walking around today because of Kevlar.
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Old 03-26-2015, 02:10 PM   #27
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Originally Posted by stogie1020 View Post
You would need to break it down to deaths by (1)Use of Force, (2)Vehicular Accidents, (3)Other and truthfully, there is no real accounting of this specific data anywhere. The FBI tracks police shootings as voluntarily reported (outside the standard FBI homicide crime stats) but many agencies (even some large ones like the NYPD) opt out so the numbers can be misleading. Also, death by other use of force is not really accounted for in the crime stats as being police involved.
Agreed. I didn't bother looking for the data because I don't really have the time and feared the points you made would make the process longer or harder. Like I said, it was curiosity from a mostly objective view point.
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Old 03-26-2015, 02:25 PM   #28
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I honestly think there SHOULD be some mandatory, national Use Of Force tracking.

I think it would serve to show the public how infrequently force is used per capita and shut down a lot of arguments while at the same time highlighting problem departments.

I, personally, would have no problem having each and every one of my UOF actions reported and analysed.
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Old 04-12-2015, 03:35 PM   #29
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Inb4 chromie states it's not illegal to kill cops and refers us to cop killing defense attorney
Totally ridiculous dude. You just disrespected these good cops (way more then I ever did) by comparing their murders to petty DUI's? Really? You can make DUI's go away with classes and fines. Statute of limitations - they can only come after you for it for so long, not even very long at all, we don't take DUI very serious in the US compared to other countries.

I'm not against good cops. Its really sad these dudes went down in the line of duty. There is no statute of limitations for murder. Society obviously takes that much more serious. Its not even comparable, stop being a fail troll.

Much as everyone is innocent until proven guilty in a court of law, cops are generally good guys until proven otherwise.
officers.
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Old 05-22-2015, 11:58 AM   #30
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A new mom was gunned down by a fleeing fugitive in a Nebraska backyard one day before she was due to go on maternity leave.

The Omaha gang unit police officer who had given birth to her first child just months earlier was killed Wednesday in a shootout while attempting to bring in a wanted felon.

Kerrie Orozco, 29, was shot while trying to apprehend 26-year-old Marcus D. Wheeler, who was being served a warrant by the police department's Fugitive Task Force at 1 p.m., according to City of Omaha and police department officials.

Wheeler, wanted in connection with a shooting, reportedly fled on foot from a Vane St. home in north Omaha. He cut through a yard while firing at his pursuers. Three cops, including Orozco, eventually caught up with Wheeler and opened fire, the Omaha World-Herald reported.

That's when Orozco was shot.

The fugitive continued to flee and was wounded in a yard three houses away, police said. He was found with a high-capacity magazine.

Both Orozco and Wheeler were pronounced dead at Creighton University Medical Center, the city said.

"This is a somber day for the city of Omaha, Omaha police officers especially, and the entire law enforcement community," Omaha Police Chief Todd Schmaderer said at a news conference.

Orozco, a seven-year veteran of the force, married in 2012 and gave birth to her first child, Olivia Ruth, on Feb. 17. The infant was due to be released from the hospital on Thursday after being born premature, Omaha police said.

Orozco, from Walnut, Iowa, was set to take her leave then.


"She will be missed and remembered as a loving wife, mother, daughter and dedicated officer," Omaha Mayor Jean Stothert said in a statement.

Just three Omaha police officers have been killed in the line of duty in the last 20 years.

Orozco wasn't just a popular officer, according to Schmaderer. She was also a baseball coach with the North Omaha Boys and Girls Club since 2009 and served as a Girl Scout leader and Special Olympics volunteer.

The Boys & Girls Club lovingly called her "Coach K," the group said in a tribute on Facebook.

"Our youth will treasure the positive example Coach K provided over the past 6 years coaching our baseball teams," the statement read. "Our staff treasure the opportunity they had to get to know her and she will be missed by all."

Orozco is survived by her husband, Hector Orozco Lopez, an infant daughter and two step children.

http://www.nydailynews.com/news/crim...icle-1.2230202
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Old 05-22-2015, 12:17 PM   #31
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Very sad.
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Old 05-22-2015, 12:42 PM   #32
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Very sad story

Officer Kerrie
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Old 05-22-2015, 01:16 PM   #33
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Old 05-23-2015, 07:52 PM   #34
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This is a website correlating to the following page, scroll through the FB page to see how often shit actually happens.

Heroes Memorial Foundation, Inc. - Home

https://www.facebook.com/53Hours?fref=ts

I wear a IIIa covert vest with level II spike and II stab. As of midnight when I'm off tonight, i'll have worn a vest for 29 of the last 36 hours. I'll be back in at 7am for another 12-16 hour shift.

Level is usually hard ceramic plates and i'd only keep that in my overt carrier. too big and heavy, If im hit with a rifle unexpectedly... well idk lol
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Old 05-25-2015, 07:00 AM   #35
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New Orleans Cop Shot Dead in Cruiser - ABC News

New Orleans officer shot dead in cruiser...
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Old 06-11-2015, 04:23 PM   #36
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https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/life-...ous-eugene-roy

Quote:
Life of a Police Officer" Medically and Psychologically Ruinous
Tuesday, June 9, 2015



A lengthy but serious read about the effects of stress and violence on a Police Officer. And how he fought those demons and is making a contribution to his chosen profession, but in a different way.

By Erica Hayasaki of The Atlantic.

Police officer Brian Post recognized the 16-year-old girl lying face down in the grass at the Whispering Pines apartment complex in Lynnwood, Washington. He had gotten to know her in recent weeks, helping her obtain a restraining order against her abusive ex-boyfriend. Now, here was Sangeeta Lal, unconscious, with two bullets in her chest.

He knew she was a good kid. Brian had spoken to Sangeeta over the phone just a few hours earlier. He knew her mom worked the early shift, and she would be alone. He promised he would come immediately if anything went wrong.

The call came into 911 at 4:18 a.m. that someone was breaking into her apartment. James McCray, 21, had arrived dressed in dark clothes and a red and black stocking cap, according to police reports. He chased Sangeeta outside. “Please don’t,” neighbors heard Sangeeta scream, before he shot her.

Brian didn’t make it to the complex in time. He found her sprawled just beyond the sliding glass door of her neighbor’s apartment. He looked up and saw a little girl peering through a window at the teenager in the grass. He felt Sangeeta’s neck. It pulsed, and pulsed again. Then, no more. He touched her face.

"You never know when you've saved a life, but you know when you've lost one."
“I know who the guy is, and I know where he went,” Brian told his partner. As the officers moved in on apartment 265 with weapons drawn, James looked out of the window and killed himself with a single bullet.

It was 1995, and for the next 19 years, Brian would blame himself for not being closer to Whispering Pines, for not saving Sangeeta. Brian was 31 when she was killed, and had been an officer for five years.

“She was in the worst environment, and she was trying,” said Brian, now 50. “You never know when you’ve saved a life, but you know when you’ve lost one.”

Sangeeta’s death marked the beginning of a downward spiral in Brian’s health, spurred on by a psychologically and physically challenging law enforcement career. Brian had been a healthy and fit ex-airborne infantry soldier when he began his policing career. But he eventually developed hypertension, anxiety, peripheral neuropathy, hearing loss, arthritis, and post-traumatic stress disorder.

When he was starting out, Brian says he wasn’t warned of how the career could do such damage. In 2012, an unprecedented study of 464 police officers, published in the International Journal of Emergency Mental Health linked officers’ stress with increased levels of sleep disorders, Hodgkin's lymphoma, brain cancer, heart disease, diabetes, and suicide.

Other studies have found that between 7 and 19 percent of active duty police have PTSD, while MRIs of police officers’ brains have found a connection between experiencing trauma and a reduction in areas that play roles in emotional and cognitive decision-making, memory, fear, and stress regulation.

Most of the police Brian knew with more than 10 years of service were dealing with some kind of medical or psychological issue.
In squad rooms full of cops, Brian would compare blood pressure meds with his colleagues. Most, if not all, of the police he knew with more than 10 years of service were dealing some kind of medical or psychological issue.

At night, Brian would hide his drinking from his wife. He went from sipping whiskey, to downing cheap 100-proof vodka.

“You see nothing but bodies, I swear, dead people,” he said. “Car accidents, hangings, suicides, murders, SIDS deaths.” He remembered a diabetic who killed himself by overdosing on chocolate. And then there was the conversation with a tongue-pierced meth user with an enlarged heart who had told Brian, “I’m white trash until the day I die.” He assaulted people in a parking lot and died in custody after deputies restrained him. The next day, Brian found himself close to fainting after viewing the autopsy photos of the same kid’s esophagus, and pierced tongue.

“I was so angry at this one woman for dying, that I yelled at her,” he said. “I just didn’t want to see another dead body…I should have recognized at that point, it’s time for me to back up.”

Years passed, and every once in while, Brian would Google Sangeeta Lal’s name. He wondered who else remembered her. He wondered if anyone had memorialized her.

* * *

Every few years, I would Google Sangeeta’s name too.

She was my friend, and high school classmate. We were the same age. Like the rest of her friends, I had known about her abusive boyfriend, who was gang affiliated, and how she had broken it off, which only enraged him more.

Sangeeta had the face of a child, round and cheeky, with long wavy black hair that she smoothed down with coconut oil. She usually showed up to school in lipstick the same shade as her nails, and jeans four sizes too big for her 5-foot frame, cuffed at the bottoms and held up with a long belt. Her family had relocated from Fiji to our town 22 minutes north of Seattle.

Sangeeta was the first person I had known and cared about who died violently, and the first death I ever covered as a journalist.

Our campus sat between a grove of evergreen trees on one side, and a run-down mall on the other. It had all of the makings of a public school caught in the throes of a changing urban city. Gangs had begun infiltrating the area, and with them came the occasional drive-by shooting, drug deal, or murder. My freshman year, murders, robberies, rapes, and assaults jumped by 18.4 percent in our county from the previous year, according to The Seattle Times, and our 29,000-resident city of Lynnwood had the highest crime rate in the county per capita that year—about 110 crimes committed for every 1,000 residents.

Sangeeta’s apartment complex was about five minutes away from mine. Police referred to Whispering Pines as “Whispering Crimes,” Brian later said. On slow nights, officers would drive through the complex and inevitably find someone breaking the law. Sangeeta’s single mother worked an early shift at the Nintendo of America headquarters in Redmond, Washington.

Sangeeta was killed on the same day that Timothy McVeigh blew up the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building in Oklahoma City, killing 168.

That afternoon, I waited for news of Sangeeta’s death to come over the television set. But all channels went back to firefighters and frantic parents in Oklahoma. When the newspaper mentioned the murder-suicide the next day, it printed her age wrong. It said she was in her late teens, or maybe 20. It didn’t mention her name at all. So I wrote a front-page story about Sangeeta for The Royal Gazette, our high school newspaper. She was the first person I had known and cared about who died violently, and the first death I ever covered as a journalist.

I would go on to become a national reporter, covering many more shootings, deaths, and high profile news events. Sixteen years after Sangeeta died, I ended up writing about a college class on death. It was in New Jersey, taught by Dr. Norma Bowe, a registered nurse who also held a master’s degree in health administration, a Ph.D. in community health policy. I also became a student in her class.

“Most of you are here for a reason,” the professor said on the first day. “Maybe someone’s story in this room, or someone’s experience, might press on some scar tissue for you. So that’s okay. We’re sitting in a circle right now because we’re really beginning a bereavement group.”

I opened a blank page on my computer screen and sat there for a moment. Then, I began to type: Dear Sangeeta...
She gave out the first assignment. Everyone opened up their notebooks and waited for her cue to take notes: “Write a goodbye letter to someone or something that you’ve lost,” she said. “I’d like you to say whatever you need to say to that person and then I’d like you to sign and date the letter. Whatever popped into your head first when I said those words, that’s where you should go.”

“Any questions?” she asked. Students shook their heads and began zipping coats and bags. “Alright, have a good week.”

A few days later, I opened a blank page on my computer screen and sat there for a moment remembering what she had told the class. Then, I began to type: Dear Sangeeta…

I held on to the letter for a couple of years, and then, last December, at the suggestion of the professor, decided to post it online.

* * *

In the years after Sangeeta died, Brian continued to self-medicate with alcohol. He sealed off her death, and all of the others, in a mental chamber he tried not to open.

“By sealing off, I mean I let it fester,” he said later. “I went through a very dark time.”

His job continued to plague him. Brian was one of the officers who closed in on Lonnie Cedric Davis, who went on killing spree in Shoreline, Washington, in 1999. Davis stabbed his mother and 18-month-old nephew to death in their home, before driving 100 miles per hour on the I-5, and crashing into a 64-year-old motorcyclist who lost part of his leg. Davis escaped into a Shoreline neighborhood, breaking the neck of an 82-year-old woman and beating a 63-year-old retired nurse to death.

“He went into a house that had guns in it,” Brian recalled. Police would later find five weapons, including a semiautomatic assault pistol, and lots of ammunition. “Then the fight was on. It lasted a couple of hours… fragments of my round hit him.”

Lonnie fired up to 50 shots at police, until a sniper round finally killed him with a gunshot to the head.

Brian’s drinking worsened. While he was on the force, his mother had died of cancer, his sister had committed suicide, and his father had died in a skydiving accident. His marriage ended.

All of the death. All of the misery. “What’s the point?” He thought those words would be carved into his tombstone.

After 10 years with Lynnwood Police, Brian spent seven years in the sheriff’s department, until one day in 2008, when he came to work drunk.

The sheriff fired him.

He could have given up on life right then. Instead, he gave up on alcohol. It was the last time he drank.

"How do you prepare or train an individual to see 26 children who have been murdered?"

Brian got counseling. But it was too late. He couldn’t get his job back. He went to work for an organization called Safe Call Now instead. Established in 2009 by former police officer Sean Riley, it is a confidential 24-hour crisis referral service for law enforcement and emergency services personnel, which also works with the FBI National Academy Associates Inc. to do mental health training for first responders.

“How do you prepare or train an individual to see 26 children who have been murdered?” Sean said. “Those tragedies. Newtown. Aurora. For any human being, how are they supposed to handle that?”

Sean had previously worked as a homicide and sexual assault detective, and got to the point where he was taking 40 Vicodin a day. Too often, officers will try to cope on their own,” Sean said. “In the profession, they often have been trained to think, “I can’t show weakness, I can’t break down.’ You’ve got this shield, this bullet proof vest, because you have to do your job. Where is your outlet?....You think, ‘Is someone going to report me? Am I going to lose my job?’ You have to keep up this fašade.”

Last month in Nevada, Sean led “emotional body armor” training for 30 police and correction officers, dispatchers, and military personnel. Similar trainings take place around the country. After two-and-a-half days, these normally guarded professionals were “crying, reflecting down on their knees in the program,” he said. “We can break them down in about the first hour.”

Five years since Brian was fired from the sheriff’s department, he now answers calls from struggling law enforcement personnel across the nation. The organization averages 70 to 150 calls per month. He can relate to their concerns of not wanting to appear weak.

“You see these bright shiny faces in the academy, and you think, ‘Oh, you poor bastards. You have no idea how fun and how bad this is going to be for you,’” Brian said. “They get to play cops and robbers for real. They get to shoot bullets and drive fast.”

They have no idea yet which lives they will lose.

In February, Brian Googled Sangeeta’s name again.

If she had lived, she would have been 35 years old.

* * *

I got an email in my inbox on Feb. 12. It read:

“My name is Brian Post, I'm a "retired" former Lynnwood police officer who knew [Sangeeta]. I was the officer who talked with her about the Protection Order, I tried to stay close to the apartments, and I made sure the other officers on the crew knew about the situation. Unfortunately, I was also the officer who found her and felt her last heart tremor.

There's more I suppose, and I've felt enormous guilt for being so far away... until now I've always been so saddened that there was apparently nothing to memorialize her. It was a lovely letter, I'm glad people will know her name.”
A week later, I met Brian at a Starbucks in Lynnwood. “It’s not Mayberry,” Brian said, referring to the idyllic small town from the Andy Griffith Show. But Lynnwood is a different city now. Crime rates have dropped, and gangs have been quelled. The mall has been upgraded and beautified. The old Lynnwood High School, demolished. A bright, modern high school built not too far away. Wealthier residents have hung on. Families from Somalia, Ethiopia, West Africa, India and beyond have moved in.

Brian towered over me, a barrel of a man with close-cropped blondish-white hair. I could see how he might be intimidating if you met him in a dark alley with his gun, but on this rainy day he seemed gentle.

About two-and-a-half years ago, he went through a period of mourning. He’d thought about trying to reach out to Sangeeta’s mother.

Sangeeta's death changed the way he policed, and he carried her memory with him in every domestic violence case that he encountered.
“I don’t think I will ever accept it,” he said. “In my perfect world, I would have been closer…I knew exactly where her apartment was. I’ve thought about how I would have approached him.”

If James had shot at them first, Brian would have swiftly killed him.

Sangeeta’s death changed the way he policed, and he carried her memory with him in every domestic violence case that he encountered. Losing a domestic violence case at trial, or when a victim declined to prosecute, became almost more than he could take. “I became unreasonably frustrated,” he said, “almost panicked, feeling that I'd failed again.”

Brian now teaches firearms and tactics classes, in addition to working with Safe Call Now and Code 4 North West, a similar program aimed at first responders in Washington State. He attends regular therapy, has remained sober, and has overcome his PTSD.

Often, he feels lost in the civilian world. “I still have to admit, I do struggle,” he told me. He still thinks of Sangeeta. He still doesn’t know whose life he may have saved over the years.

But he saved his own, and I am so grateful that he did.
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Old 06-11-2015, 10:42 PM   #37
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Well, shit...



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Old 06-12-2015, 07:32 AM   #38
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We really do do a pretty shitty job with mental health in this country. trust me, I've seen the system in action.
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Old 06-12-2015, 12:12 PM   #39
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I used to have to go get a "check up from the neck up" every 18 months since what I was doing was classified as 'undercover' work, but truthfully, it was so basic, it was a joke...

We would take the MMPI and a few other tests that, after the first time, you knew how to answer ("YES/NO: I am afraid of thunder." "FILL IN BLANK: I get angry when_____") and then talk to a Bureau shrink to discuss the result and a control officer to make sure we weren't drooling on ourselves.

Honestly, there was no subject matter specific conversation relevant to what I was doing (child sexual exploitation investigations) and NOTHING even related to the day in day out issues we faced (and still do). I will take a lot of those experience with me to the grave as fresh, vivid, memories, even though they occurred many years ago.

Ultimately, you can't un-experience things, and police officers often experience the terrible things at an alarming rate and density. Eventually it manifests itself.
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Old 06-12-2015, 12:18 PM   #40
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I haven't commented in the other train wreck of a thread, and full disclosure I haven't watched the video of the Texas pool incident.

The advent of ubiquitous cameras has raised the standard of performance to utter perfection for cops, with the punishment being national vilification and loss of livelihood for a single misstep regardless of any mitigating circumstances that a reasonable person would take into consideration (speaking here of the incidents that Casebolt dealt with before having to wade into the navel-gazing shitstorm party at the pool).

I fucking hate the cell phone video/youtube phenomenon. It makes us less human as a society and more like the Dictatorship of the Proletariat every day.

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