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Old 07-14-2015, 10:03 PM
  #41  
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The wiki page is interesting
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/New_Horizons

I was mainly interested to see what kind of CPU and storage it had on board. I figured it would have a Pentium 2 or 3.
The processor used for its flight computers is the Mongoose-V, a 12 MHz radiation-hardened version of the MIPS R3000 CPU.


BTW it has 8GB solid state storage for data collection.

It went into safe mode on July 4th. They must have totally freaked out when that happened.

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Old 07-14-2015, 11:33 PM
  #42  
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They're getting data back at about 1-4kbps
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Old 07-15-2015, 09:51 AM
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Old 07-15-2015, 01:11 PM
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Good thing I've been practicing hunting womp rats.
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Old 07-15-2015, 02:58 PM
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Charon?s Surprising Youthful and Varied Terrain | NASA





Remarkable new details of Pluto’s largest moon Charon are revealed in this image from New Horizons’ Long Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI), taken late on July 13, 2015 from a distance of 289,000 miles (466,000 kilometers).

A swath of cliffs and troughs stretches about 600 miles (1,000 kilometers) from left to right, suggesting widespread fracturing of Charon’s crust, likely a result of internal processes. At upper right, along the moon’s curving edge, is a canyon estimated to be 4 to 6 miles (7 to 9 kilometers) deep.

Mission scientists are surprised by the apparent lack of craters on Charon. South of the moon’s equator, at the bottom of this image, terrain is lit by the slanting rays of the sun, creating shadows that make it easier to distinguish topography. Even here, however, relatively few craters are visible, indicating a relatively young surface that has been reshaped by geologic activity.

In Charon’s north polar region, a dark marking prominent in New Horizons’ approach images is now seen to have a diffuse boundary, suggesting it is a thin deposit of dark material. Underlying it is a distinct, sharply bounded, angular feature; higher resolution images still to come are expected to shed more light on this enigmatic region.

The image has been compressed to reduce its file size for transmission to Earth. In high-contrast areas of the image, features as small as 3 miles (5 kilometers) across can be seen. Some lower-contrast detail is obscured by the compression of the image, which may make some areas appear smoother than they really are. The uncompressed version still resides in New Horizons’ computer memory and is scheduled to be transmitted at a later date.

The image has been combined with color information obtained by New Horizons’ Ralph instrument on July 13.

New Horizons traveled more than three billion miles over nine-and-a-half years to reach the Pluto system.

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Old 07-15-2015, 04:09 PM
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The Icy Mountains of Pluto | NASA


New close-up images of a region near Pluto’s equator reveal a giant surprise: a range of youthful mountains rising as high as 11,000 feet (3,500 meters) above the surface of the icy body.

The mountains likely formed no more than 100 million years ago -- mere youngsters relative to the 4.56-billion-year age of the solar system -- and may still be in the process of building, says Jeff Moore of New Horizons’ Geology, Geophysics and Imaging Team (GGI). That suggests the close-up region, which covers less than one percent of Pluto’s surface, may still be geologically active today.

Moore and his colleagues base the youthful age estimate on the lack of craters in this scene. Like the rest of Pluto, this region would presumably have been pummeled by space debris for billions of years and would have once been heavily cratered -- unless recent activity had given the region a facelift, erasing those pockmarks.

“This is one of the youngest surfaces we’ve ever seen in the solar system,” says Moore.

Unlike the icy moons of giant planets, Pluto cannot be heated by gravitational interactions with a much larger planetary body. Some other process must be generating the mountainous landscape.

“This may cause us to rethink what powers geological activity on many other icy worlds,” says GGI deputy team leader John Spencer of the Southwest Research Institute in Boulder, Colo.

The mountains are probably composed of Pluto’s water-ice “bedrock.”

Although methane and nitrogen ice covers much of the surface of Pluto, these materials are not strong enough to build the mountains. Instead, a stiffer material, most likely water-ice, created the peaks. “At Pluto’s temperatures, water-ice behaves more like rock,” said deputy GGI lead Bill McKinnon of Washington University, St. Louis.

The close-up image was taken about 1.5 hours before New Horizons closest approach to Pluto, when the craft was 47,800 miles (77,000 kilometers) from the surface of the planet. The image easily resolves structures smaller than a mile across.
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Old 07-16-2015, 08:39 AM
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Originally Posted by jdw1 View Post
That's no moon...
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Old 07-16-2015, 09:50 AM
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it's the dwarf star!
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Old 07-16-2015, 12:40 PM
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This is fascinating. If the Earth's Moon was the size of one pixel how big would the rest of the solar system be. Gives you a good idea of the vastness of space and the power of gravity over such long distances.

See if you can make it to Jupiter before you get bored

If the Moon Were Only 1 Pixel - A tediously accurate map of the solar system

(h/t - Elon Musk)
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Old 07-16-2015, 12:49 PM
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^That's pretty cool
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Old 07-16-2015, 01:00 PM
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I thought this was common knowledge?

I vaguely remember learning about it in middle school or something that a proper scale model of the solar system with the earth the size of like a pepper corn, that Pluto would be like half a mile away.!
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Old 07-16-2015, 01:02 PM
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It was it a basketball and pluto would be on SoCal. something crazy like that.
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Old 07-16-2015, 01:22 PM
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Well yeah, this is a little more interactive if you manually scroll there.
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Old 07-16-2015, 02:11 PM
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Originally Posted by #1 STUNNA View Post
Well yeah, this is a little more interactive if you manually scroll there.
I feel you'd get a better feel of the distance if you walked the half mile instead of scrolling with a finger.
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Old 07-16-2015, 02:36 PM
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Or just say thanks for the cool link...
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Old 07-16-2015, 02:38 PM
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Meh
I give no thanks to stunna

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Old 07-16-2015, 03:19 PM
  #57  
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As long as blackack still does, that's all that matters to me...
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Old 07-16-2015, 03:23 PM
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Originally Posted by #1 STUNNA View Post
This is fascinating. If the Earth's Moon was the size of one pixel how big would the rest of the solar system be. Gives you a good idea of the vastness of space and the power of gravity over such long distances.

See if you can make it to Jupiter before you get bored

If the Moon Were Only 1 Pixel - A tediously accurate map of the solar system

(h/t - Elon Musk)
Server appears to be down.

I first saw this in HS, but it has been updated. Still amazes me. It starts at the human scale and goes both directions down to space/time threads and up to the observable universe.

Scale of Universe - Interactive Scale of the Universe Tool

This one is pretty neat too. It's essentially a video depicting light traveling from the sun on it's 45 minute journey past Jupiter. I suggest using the timer in the top right to skip to the "next celestial body".

https://vimeo.com/117815404

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Old 07-16-2015, 07:29 PM
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Old 07-17-2015, 08:37 AM
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Stunna, pick up this issue of Time on the cheap. Well worth it. I paid full price at Publix waiting in line and i'm not mad about it. I too am facinated by the Universe.

Time Magazine The Search for Life in the Universe 2015: Various: Amazon.com: Books Time Magazine The Search for Life in the Universe 2015: Various: Amazon.com: Books
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Old 07-17-2015, 09:39 AM
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Originally Posted by #1 STUNNA View Post
As long as blackack still does, that's all that matters to me...
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Old 07-17-2015, 10:37 AM
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Originally Posted by Mizouse View Post
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Old 07-21-2015, 02:00 PM
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Originally Posted by #1 STUNNA View Post
This is also really cool nonconventional look of our solar system in relationship to the Milky Way galaxy

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0jHsq36_NTU
I know this is old; I don't care. After watching this, I couldn't help but know instinctively that this model is grossly wrong. It simply doesn't add up to not only theoretical gravitational laws, but it doesn't even match what we have observed about our solar system and galaxy in the last century. It wasn't hard to find a debunk article that points out the numerous flaws of this guy's theory.

Vortex motion: Viral video showing Sun?s motion through galaxy is wrong.

Cliffs: DJ Sadhu got his ideas from a quack named Pallathadka Keshava Bhat who wrote a paper about why the heliocentric model is wrong. Then DJ Sadhu, in the face of glaring factual errors, made a video about it. Cool story bros.
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Old 07-22-2015, 09:43 AM
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Originally Posted by #1 STUNNA View Post
This is fascinating. If the Earth's Moon was the size of one pixel how big would the rest of the solar system be. Gives you a good idea of the vastness of space and the power of gravity over such long distances.

See if you can make it to Jupiter before you get bored

If the Moon Were Only 1 Pixel - A tediously accurate map of the solar system

(h/t - Elon Musk)
This is really neat. Just holding the button to scroll, I made it to Uranus, about 1.7 Billion + miles. The scroll bar was halfway on my screen when I made it there. I clicked ahead to Neptune and checked the mileage again, there's about another billion miles just between those two planets. Truly incredible. And from Neptune to Pluto, about 900 million.

Thanks for the link! It was a lot of fun.
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Old 07-22-2015, 11:29 AM
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Originally Posted by Undying Dreams View Post
This is really neat. Just holding the button to scroll, I made it to Uranus
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Old 07-22-2015, 12:22 PM
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haha

I really did though! I fooled with that for about a half hour lol
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Old 07-22-2015, 12:39 PM
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Originally Posted by Undying Dreams View Post
haha

I really did though! I fooled with that for about a half hour lol
You're just making it worse...
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Old 07-22-2015, 01:04 PM
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Doh!

The probe has no new discoveries.
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Old 07-23-2015, 02:08 PM
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A super-Earth found in the habitable zone of a Sun-like star | Ars Technica
Since its launch in 2009, the $600 million Kepler Space Telescope has been scanning the cosmos in search of exoplanets—planets outside our Solar System. To date, the planet-hunting telescope has identified over 4,000 potential planets, of which nearly 1,000 have been confirmed. Faulty reaction wheels (used to maintain the telescope’s orientation in space) resulted in the termination of Kepler’s primary mission in 2013. But thanks to some out-of-the-box thinking, scientists were able to harness photons from the Sun to act as a third reaction wheel, stabilizing and allowing the telescope to carry on.


Data from the first mission is still being analyzed, and the latest results to come out of it include a dozen planetary candidates that are similar to Earth in size and orbit within the habitable zone of their stars. As of today, one of these has been confirmed to be an actual planet.

Of the roughly 1,030 confirmed exoplanets that Kepler has detected, again, only a dozen are close in size to the Earth. This time last year, Kepler identified its first Earth-sized planet in a habitable zone: Kepler-186f. The habitable zone, sometimes referred to as the “Goldilocks Zone,” is the region around a star that has just the right conditions to find liquid water on a planet’s surface. And liquid water is a key ingredient in the search for life.

A group of scientists led by Jeffrey Coughlin of the SETI Institute analyzed four years of Kepler data and just released a new catalog of exoplanet candidates. The catalog adds over 500 new possible planets, bringing the total number of potential new worlds to 4,696.



The full catalog of Kepler planetary candidates, with the newest finds shown in yellow.
NASA/W. Stenzel

“This catalog contains our first analysis of all Kepler data, as well as an automated assessment of these results,” says SETI Institute scientist Jeffrey Coughlin, who led the catalog effort. “Improved analysis will allow astronomers to better determine the number of small, cool planets that are the best candidates for hosting life.”

While Kepler’s main goal has been to give us a stronger sense of what the population of exoplanets looks like, it does so by observing periodic dips in the brightness of stars. This happens when a planet crosses in front of a star as it orbits, blocking out a tiny bit of the star’s light (this is known as the transit method). Scientists can look for regular dips in brightness and determine if the cause is a planet or not. However, confirmation of planetary status requires observations by other instruments, primarily ground-based observations. Kepler is incredibly accurate in its predictions as the majority of Kepler’s discoveries have been confirmed as actual planets.

But in addition to surveying all planets, Kepler’s specialty is its ability to spot rocky, terrestrial planets similar to Earth. Within the new catalog are 12 exoplanet candidates that orbit in the habitable zone and measure less than twice Earth’s diameter. So far, one out of the 12 has been confirmed as an exoplanet. Located 1,400 light-years from Earth, Kepler 452b could be Earth 2.0. It orbits a star very similar to the Sun. The G2 star—the same type as our Sun—is 10 percent more massive and 20 percent brighter than our Sun. Kepler 452b’s host star is also approximately the same temperature as our Sun and the newly discovered planet orbits once every 385 days—five percent longer than the Earth’s orbital period.

“We can think of Kepler-452b as an older, bigger cousin to the Earth, providing an opportunity to understand and reflect upon Earth’s evolving environment," said Jon Jenkins, Kepler data analysis lead at NASA's Ames Research Center in Moffett Field, California. Jenkins led the team that discovered Kepler-452b. "It’s awe-inspiring to consider that this planet has spent six billion years in the habitable zone of its star; longer than Earth. That’s substantial opportunity for life to arise, should all the necessary ingredients and conditions for life exist on this planet.




A comparison of the Solar System to two exoplanets. Kepler-186, discovered earlier, was the first Earth-like planet found in the habitable zone of a dim star. Kepler-452 is the first found in the habitable zone of a Sun-like star.
NASA/JPL-CalTech/R. Hurt


Kepler 452b’s radius puts in a class of planets that are between the size of Earth and Neptune. Based on its size and the fact it orbits its host star at roughly the same distance the Earth orbits the Sun, it’s very likely that Kepler 452b is a rocky world, with a thick atmosphere, liquid water on its surface, and possibly even active volcanoes. This intermediary class of planet is the most common found by Kepler; however, we do not see this type of planet represented in our own Solar System.

While Kepler 452b’s host star resembles our Sun in size and brightness, it is much older. Studying this system could give us a peek into the future and allow scientists to predict what will happen to our planet as the Sun ages.

This new discovery comes 20 years after the first exoplanet discovery. John Grunsfeld, associate administrator of NASA’s Science Mission Directorate, reflected on this fact in a media teleconference today. "On the 20th anniversary year of the discovery that proved other suns host planets, the Kepler exoplanet explorer has discovered a planet and star which most closely resemble the Earth and our Sun. This exciting result brings us one step closer to finding an Earth 2.0."
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Old 07-23-2015, 02:38 PM
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Why does a life sustaining planet have to be similar in size to Earth?

I get the Goldilocks zone, but why size?
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Old 07-23-2015, 02:46 PM
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Then again, our understanding of "life" is based off the principals of this planet.

The universe is huge, so who really knows.
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Old 09-28-2015, 11:16 AM
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They found liquid water on Mars! It's very salty brine water but because it is it's in a liquid phase over a wider range of temps. Normal pure liquid water on mars freezes at 0C but it boils at 10C because of Mars very thin atmosphere which only has 0.6% the pressure of Earth. This very salty water on Mars freezes at -70C and boils at 24C.




NASA Confirms Evidence That Liquid Water Flows on Today’s Mars






New findings from NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) provide the strongest evidence yet that liquid water flows intermittently on present-day Mars.

Using an imaging spectrometer on MRO, researchers detected signatures of hydrated minerals on slopes where mysterious streaks are seen on the Red Planet. These darkish streaks appear to ebb and flow over time. They darken and appear to flow down steep slopes during warm seasons, and then fade in cooler seasons. They appear in several locations on Mars when temperatures are above minus 10 degrees Fahrenheit (minus 23 Celsius), and disappear at colder times.

“Our quest on Mars has been to ‘follow the water,’ in our search for life in the universe, and now we have convincing science that validates what we’ve long suspected,” said John Grunsfeld, astronaut and associate administrator of NASA’s Science Mission Directorate in Washington. “This is a significant development, as it appears to confirm that water -- albeit briny -- is flowing today on the surface of Mars.”

These downhill flows, known as recurring slope lineae (RSL), often have been described as possibly related to liquid water. The new findings of hydrated salts on the slopes point to what that relationship may be to these dark features. The hydrated salts would lower the freezing point of a liquid brine, just as salt on roads here on Earth causes ice and snow to melt more rapidly. Scientists say it’s likely a shallow subsurface flow, with enough water wicking to the surface to explain the darkening.

"We found the hydrated salts only when the seasonal features were widest, which suggests that either the dark streaks themselves or a process that forms them is the source of the hydration. In either case, the detection of hydrated salts on these slopes means that water plays a vital role in the formation of these streaks," said Lujendra Ojha of the Georgia Institute of Technology (Georgia Tech) in Atlanta, lead author of a report on these findings published Sept. 28 by Nature Geoscience.

Ojha first noticed these puzzling features as a University of Arizona undergraduate student in 2010, using images from the MRO's High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE). HiRISE observations now have documented RSL at dozens of sites on Mars. The new study pairs HiRISE observations with mineral mapping by MRO’s Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM).

The spectrometer observations show signatures of hydrated salts at multiple RSL locations, but only when the dark features were relatively wide. When the researchers looked at the same locations and RSL weren't as extensive, they detected no hydrated salt.

Ojha and his co-authors interpret the spectral signatures as caused by hydrated minerals called perchlorates. The hydrated salts most consistent with the chemical signatures are likely a mixture of magnesium perchlorate, magnesium chlorate and sodium perchlorate. Some perchlorates have been shown to keep liquids from freezing even when conditions are as cold as minus 94 degrees Fahrenheit (minus 70 Celsius). On Earth, naturally produced perchlorates are concentrated in deserts, and some types of perchlorates can be used as rocket propellant.

Perchlorates have previously been seen on Mars. NASA's Phoenix lander and Curiosity rover both found them in the planet's soil, and some scientists believe that the Viking missions in the 1970s measured signatures of these salts. However, this study of RSL detected perchlorates, now in hydrated form, in different areas than those explored by the landers. This also is the first time perchlorates have been identified from orbit.

MRO has been examining Mars since 2006 with its six science instruments.

"The ability of MRO to observe for multiple Mars years with a payload able to see the fine detail of these features has enabled findings such as these: first identifying the puzzling seasonal streaks and now making a big step towards explaining what they are," said Rich Zurek, MRO project scientist at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) in Pasadena, California.

For Ojha, the new findings are more proof that the mysterious lines he first saw darkening Martian slopes five years ago are, indeed, present-day water.

"When most people talk about water on Mars, they're usually talking about ancient water or frozen water," he said. "Now we know there’s more to the story. This is the first spectral detection that unambiguously supports our liquid water-formation hypotheses for RSL."

The discovery is the latest of many breakthroughs by NASA’s Mars missions.

“It took multiple spacecraft over several years to solve this mystery, and now we know there is liquid water on the surface of this cold, desert planet,” said Michael Meyer, lead scientist for NASA’s Mars Exploration Program at the agency’s headquarters in Washington. “It seems that the more we study Mars, the more we learn how life could be supported and where there are resources to support life in the future.”
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Old 09-28-2015, 11:17 AM
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Time to terraform the shit out of Mars then
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Old 08-24-2016, 01:41 PM
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Astronomers Discover a New Planet Orbiting the Closest Star to the Sun!

There’s no other way to phrase it. This is HUGE news: Astronomers have found a planet orbiting the Proxima Centauri, the closest star to the Sun!

Holy wow. Seriously. Wow.

Before I get into details, let me sum up what we know:

The planet, called Proxima Centauri b or just Proxima b (exoplanets are given their star’s name plus a lower case letter in order of discovery, starting with “b”), orbits Proxima every 11.2 days. It has a mass of no less than 1.3 times the Earth’s, so if it’s rock and metal like Earth it’s only a bit bigger. It’s a mere 7.3 million kilometers from the star—a lot closer than Earth's distance from the Sun of 150 million kilometers!—but Proxima is so faint and cool it receives about two-thirds the amount of light and heat the Earth does. That means that it’s in Proxima’s habitable zone: It’s possible (more or less) that liquid water could exist on its surface.

Did I mention wow? Because wow.

The European Southern Observatory put together
:


There’s some backstory here, and it’s very cool. Proxima Centauri is only 0.14 times the diameter of the Sun and 0.12 times its mass. Its surface temperature is much lower, so it’s cool and red, what we call a red dwarf. It orbits a binary star called Alpha Centauri, made of two stars more similar to the Sun (so the whole system is a trinary star). Proxima is pretty far out from the pair, about 0.1 light-years or so (a trillion kilometers), about 200 times farther than the distance of Neptune from the Sun. So it’s nearly out by itself in space, barely bound to the binary.

The Alpha Centauri binary is easily visible from Earth’s Southern Hemisphere, though they look like one star at their distance of about 4.3 light-years, and are among the brightest stars in the sky. Proxima, even though it’s closer to us, is so intrinsically dim that you need a good pair of binoculars to see it at all.

Because it’s the closest star to the Sun, astronomers have looked at it for decades to see if there’s any evidence of a planet. There have been false alarms over the years, all eventually shown to be errors.

But this time it looks like it’s very much real. The difference is the quality of data, because our technology and techniques have improved mightily recently. Using two different cameras on two different telescopes, the astronomers divided the light from Proxima into a spectrum showing many individual colors. They looked for subtle and periodic changes in the spectrum that would be due to a planet orbiting the star. As the planet moved, it would tug on the star;Proxima would make a little circle as the planet made a bigger one. This creates a Doppler shift in the spectrum, which in principle can be measured.

The faster the planet orbits, the bigger the shift, and usually the easier it is to detect. Proxima b, though, moves around its star at a leisurely one or two meters per second; if you walked briskly, you could outpace it! That's a very small signal.

But the eyesight of the cameras was sharp, and the ability of the astronomers to tease out the signal greater. By using other telescopes to observe the star, they were able to account for any change in the star’s brightness that could masquerade as a planet, confounding the results. In the end, the signal from the planet’s motion came out pretty clearly. I have to admit, it looks pretty solid to me.And now we know that it’s possible the nearest Earth-like planet may be, on a cosmic scale, right next door.
That’s important to me: A few years back a planet was announced orbiting one of the stars of Alpha Centauri, which was very big news. But later it was found to be a spurious signal, and in reality no planet was seen. Planet discoveries get retracted every now and again, especially ones where the signal is faint. In this case when I heard the news I was pretty skeptical, but after reading the paper it looks good to me. I’m satisfied the planet is real.

There are some caveats, though. For one, we can’t know the true mass of the planet. If we see the orbit edge-on then it has a mass of 1.3 times the Earth. But if the orbit is tipped, the mass has to be greater to cause the star to wobble as observed, and if the orbit is tipped by 45°, say, the planet’s mass has to be 40 percent bigger. If it’s tipped more, the planet has to be even more massive.

We’re not sure of the shape of the orbit. It might be elliptical (aficionados of exoplanets take note; the eccentricity is no more than 0.35), or it might be circular. But either way, it’s at the right distance from Proxima that, given reasonable assumptions about the planet’s composition, it could have liquid water on its surface. This calculation has a lot of caveats—its temperature without an atmosphere would probably be around -40° C, but Earth’s average temperature without the greenhouse effect is only -15°. So yeah, cold, but if it has enough CO2 or other greenhouse gases in the air (assuming it even has air!), it could be clement there.

If so, that makes it not just the closest exoplanet known, but the closest potentially habitable one known.

Again: wow.



Although Proxima is about 1/7th the size of the Sun, Proxima b is so close to it the star would appear three times bigger in the sky than the Sun does from Earth.ESO/G. Coleman

Mind you, we know nothing of its composition, or even its size. It may be completely uninhabitable, or it might be Eden. There’s no way to know. So be cautious here: It’s likely to be Earth-size, but we don’t know if it’s Earth-like.

Either way, it’s more than 40 trillion kilometers away, so we’re not going there any time soon. The fastest spacecraft we’ve ever launched would take many tens of thousands of years to get there. Don’t pack your underthings just yet.

Still, this is terribly, terribly exciting. We’ve only known for sure about the existence of exoplanets—worlds orbiting alien suns—since 1992. The first found were orbiting a dead star, a pulsar. The first planet orbiting a Sun-like star wasn’t found until 1995, and in the next two decades we built telescopes dedicated to looking for them, and as of today we know of over 3,000 such strange, new worlds.

Quite a few are Earth-size, and fewer possibly Earth-like. Still, we can make estimates that there are billions of Earth-size planets in the galaxy.

And now we know that it’s possible that the nearest one is, on a cosmic scale, right next door.

People say that it’s a curse to live in interesting times. But with science, it’s not. It’s amazing.
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Old 08-24-2016, 01:51 PM
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Old 08-24-2016, 02:16 PM
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Old 08-25-2016, 07:14 AM
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Yeah I read something like 80,000 years to get there
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Old 08-25-2016, 07:58 AM
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Originally Posted by #1 STUNNA View Post
This is fascinating. If the Earth's Moon was the size of one pixel how big would the rest of the solar system be. Gives you a good idea of the vastness of space and the power of gravity over such long distances.

See if you can make it to Jupiter before you get bored

If the Moon Were Only 1 Pixel - A tediously accurate map of the solar system

(h/t - Elon Musk)
I gave up at saturn traveling at the speed of light for 80 min
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Old 08-28-2016, 07:27 PM
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Old 08-29-2016, 07:07 AM
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I thought Jupiter and Saturn would be significantly larger like taking the entire sight of the horizon but I guess it's farther than I thought.
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