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Rear Wheel Hub Assembly Replacement

 
Old 07-11-2017, 01:52 PM
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Rear Wheel Hub Assembly Replacement

Although I have done a fair amount of searching before moving ahead with this DIY, I didn't find anything that documented the First Gen RDX rear wheel hub replacement.

I did find this,
https://acurazine.com/how-tos/a/acur...earings-426247

But it wasn't really accurate, at least for my application, so thought I would document my project and share for the community.

Although a few learning moments for me when I did the first side, it wasn't a difficult job. The first side took me a couple hours as I worked out the process, but the second was only and hour.

I will disclaimer that I am not a mechanic, but have 30 years experience working on my own vehicles. I encourage safe practices and do not suggest that because anything I detail below worked for me, will work for you. This is entirely a DIY project and if anyone else gets benefit from it, that's great, this is simply a journal of what worked for me.

Parts - 2 rear wheel hub assemblies - $192.99 each, local quality parts store, Moog OEM replacements.

Tools,
Sockets - 12mm,17mm, 36mm
3/8" ratchet, 1/2" breaker bar, 3in (small), 6in(med) extensions
Hammer, puller, flat blade screw driver (multi-tool, who really makes flat head screws anymore), Philips screwdriver, 2 jacks, jack stands, 1/2" power bar, torque wrench, impact driver/ratchet just makes removal of some items faster, but not essential

1. Jack up the car, I put a jack under the centre of the rear, on the frame to pick up the entire rear end, making access to both sides without having to move the jack, put on jack stands.
2. Set the parking brake, you'll know why in a minute
3. Remove the rear wheel
4. Use your breaker bar and 36mm hub nut socket to loosen the hub nut (now you know why to set the parking break, hope your works good). If not perhaps consider loosening the hub nut with the car down before jacking it up, just breaking it not totally loosening it.
36mm socket and breaker bar, with emergency brake set, brake caliper, pads and bracket removed.5. Release the parking brake
6.Remove brake caliper, bracket and pads
8. Remove the rubber cap for the parking brake adjuster, and back the shoes off a few turns to make sure the rotor slides off easily. (I figured this out after the first one didn't and I broke one of the spring pins off the shoes, fixed, replaced, learned, move on)
9. Remove the philips head screws on the rotors (if you still have them). Personally, I put antiseize on everything I touch, so next time they come off easy. Not everyone is so lucky, I've had to drill these out in the past and swore I'd never put them back in again, never did this to rotors in the old days, they still stayed on just fine with lug nuts!)
10.Remove the rotor, voila, your hub assembly. (Good chance to take a close look at your emergency brake assembly and address any issues there)
11.I put a puller on to the hub which allowed the drive shaft to push towards the transmission, creating clearance for the 4 hub bolts on the inside of the hub. This is especially necessary on one particular bolt.
You can see the clearance issue here. One of these 4 bolts cannot be accessed without pushing on the shaft and opening up some space in behind.12. You will find to gain clearance access for one lower bolt, to be able to put the small extension and socket on the bolt, you will need to align the suspension by jacking it up. This takes the control arm out of the way, and I suggest doing this first as all 4 bolts can be removed with the jack picking up the suspension.
This is why the second smaller jack comes in handy, but if you only have one, you can leave your car on the stands and use one. But this was the only way to gain enough clearance to get the socket and extension in there to remove the hub bolts.13. Loosen all 4 hub retaining bolts, yes I said 'loosen', you will not be able to actually remove these bolts with the drive shaft I the way. Use various configurations of long and short extensions to get in there, while battling the socket getting stuck between the various other parts of the vehicle. It can be done. I recommend taking the socket off after the bolts have been about 1/3 removed, and finishing them with your figures. It's tight, but if you use the puller to make space, it can be done. They do not come all the way out of their holes, just leave them there after they back out enough to free the hub.
Yes! Hub removed. See how the bolts remain in their space. Sometimes, with the hub removed, you have nothing to connect a puller to push the drive shift in, you can just use your hands to push on it to create the space you need to get your fingers in there to manipulate the bolts for loosening and tightening.14. I am pretty freaky about cleaning everything, lubricating and antisieze wherever possible. Replace the hub when everything is clean, and you have visually inspected all those areas you normally don't see, might need something else fixed while you're in there.
15. Use your hand to push on the drive shaft to create space in behind, so you can use your fingers to start all 4 bolts. Get right in there and tighten them as far as you can with your fingers to create enough space to get the socket on.
16. You should now be able to put the puller back on to free up your hands and begin to tighten the bolts with the socket. Follow a typical star pattern when tightening to make sure the hub seats evenly, torque appropriately if you can get the torque wrench in there. Honestly, for me, and this is my risk, so I don't suggest anyone actually do it, but I gave up trying to get the torque wrench in there, so I just reefed the heck out of them and I am confident they are at least as tight as they were when they came off.
New hub installed, but not yet torqued
Here's how the puller assists with clearance in the back while tightening the hub bolts. Clearance created when the puller forces the shaft to compress somewhat. I kept pushing until it stopped, but I can't help but think you should be careful on the CV joints when doing this.
16. Once the hub is installed, remove the puller.
17. Just a point to think about before you install the rotor again, don't forget which way you need to turn the brake adjuster to expand the shoes. If you reinstall the rotor and forget this, you may need to remove again to figure that out, so might as well do it now while it's all exposed to refresh your memory.
I8. Install rotor, add phillips screws (if you choose to do so).
19. Adjust emergency brake shoes to be just grabbing as you turn the rotor, then set parking brake again, don't forget to put the rubber plug back in.....argh, trust me..
20. Tighten and properly torque the hub nut. This one is easily accessible for torqueing so don't recommend compromising on this one if you have a torque wrench!
21.The rest is just reverse of removal for the brakes, and wheel installation. If you don't know how to do that, you likely shouldn't be attempting to do the hub....no offense.
22. And exactly 1 hour from when you began, you are now done. Test drive, and double check everything....like that little rubber plug on the rotor where the adjuster is...I forgot that on one of mine........hopefully no extra parts left over when you are done! Of course, that's just for one side, this is the kind of thing you should consider replacing both at the same time. Kind of like only changing one side of your brakes...they both wear equally.

Thanks!
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Old 01-28-2019, 11:45 PM
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Thanks. I found the other "how to" you referenced and started this project only to find it was really not helpful. The only issue I couldn't solve was how to access those 4 hub bolts without removing the axel boot. I can imagine this is a lunch break job without the rear axel involved but that stupid is just a couple mm in the way of getting a socket in there. What a pain. I'll try the puller trick. BTW, what is the 12mm socket needed for? I only needed the 17mm and 36mm...so far
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Old 01-29-2019, 07:13 AM
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Originally Posted by Leadfooter View Post
Thanks. I found the other "how to" you referenced and started this project only to find it was really not helpful. The only issue I couldn't solve was how to access those 4 hub bolts without removing the axel boot. I can imagine this is a lunch break job without the rear axel involved but that stupid is just a couple mm in the way of getting a socket in there. What a pain. I'll try the puller trick. BTW, what is the 12mm socket needed for? I only needed the 17mm and 36mm...so far

Hi, I'll be honest, I have reviewed all the work I did in this thread, but my memory on some of the details is vague. I can't recall exactly why I put 12mm socket as a tool needed, but maybe something simple, sorry.

As for removal of the hub bolts themselves, I do recall that as being a challenge when I did the first side. And yes, using a small puller to compress the CV is essential. Or even have a helper push in on the shaft to compress it enough to get the tools in there. You can't actually remove them just loosen them enough to remove the hub, but leave the bolts in place when it is removed. Don't forget the second jack trick to move everything up to get that last bolt. Replace in reverse.

Keep at it, you'll get there. Good luck.
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Old 01-29-2019, 10:57 PM
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Thanks for the follow-up. After considering pushing the axle in as suggested I realized I would still be fighting to get to those hub bolts. Further search and failure to find another method led me to a process showing the rear cv axle replacement for an 05 MDX, which it turns out looked just like my RDX. I found that with the easy removal of 4 suspension bolts the whole swing arm & hub could be separated from the hub with a hub puller. That gave me easy access to those 4 hub bolts with my impact wrench, which made short work of the entire process.

The pesky hub bolts with no clearance for a wrench or socket.

Remove these to allow easy CV axle removal

A closer view of the far bolt in the previous photo

The 4th bolt to remove to get the axle out.

The suspension bolts are 19mm and 17mm. I never did need that 12mm. A loaner hub puller from Autozone did the job separating the axle from the hub with little effort. Note that the ball joint remained attached as a pivot point...don't want to mess with all that!
Like OP stated second side would be much faster an hour or less. My new Timken hub was $75 in my hand but did not come with a new hub bolt. Problem solved plus I'm now equipped to quickly handle some other repairs in that area.
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Old 01-29-2019, 11:04 PM
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Awesome man, glad you got it. More than one way to skin an cat. Now if I could only get the damn emissions code (P2263) turned off. Nothing wrong with my turbo, BTW.
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Old 02-14-2019, 11:31 PM
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What symptoms did you have prior to replacing the rear hub/bearing

My RDX has alot of road noise! I was wondering if that is the rear bearing?

did you have alot of noise before you changed them out?

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Old 02-14-2019, 11:36 PM
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Originally Posted by Boxster98 View Post
My RDX has alot of road noise! I was wondering if that is the rear bearing?

did you have alot of noise before you changed them out?

Hey, no actually, no noise, just high heat. But, I have experienced noise with bearings before. Assuming you have serviced brakes and checked e-brake etc, eliminating all other possible noise options...likely the bearing.
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Old 02-15-2019, 01:34 AM
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Thanks for the great write up I appreciate you taking the time out to tackle this then document it for everyone.
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Old 02-15-2019, 05:55 AM
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Originally Posted by CSmoney28 View Post
Thanks for the great write up I appreciate you taking the time out to tackle this then document it for everyone.
No worries. I couldn't find much DIY out there so happy to share the experience if it benefits anyone.
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Old 02-15-2019, 05:59 AM
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Originally Posted by Leadfooter View Post
Thanks. I found the other "how to" you referenced and started this project only to find it was really not helpful. The only issue I couldn't solve was how to access those 4 hub bolts without removing the axel boot. I can imagine this is a lunch break job without the rear axel involved but that stupid is just a couple mm in the way of getting a socket in there. What a pain. I'll try the puller trick. BTW, what is the 12mm socket needed for? I only needed the 17mm and 36mm...so far
I did some brake work recently and figured out what you need the 12mm for, brake caliper removal. That is so obvious, I totally forgot about it. But, when I changed the calipers, the reman aftermarket part had 14mm bolts. So perhaps, it depends on the car if you actually need the 12mm.
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Old 02-15-2019, 09:01 PM
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Cool, thanks for the update.
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Old 02-18-2019, 10:45 PM
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Yes. It sounded like a tire was going bad. At first it just hummed a little above 40 or so. After a few weeks it was louder and started sooner.
The bearing was just going bad, not fried yet, so it didn't wobble and couldn't be tested by hand. I was able to confirm (enough for me at least) that it was a bearing by simply swerving a little while at speed on a smooth road. Mine was left rear so the noise decreased with steering left and increased with steering right.
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Old 02-18-2019, 10:54 PM
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Ah, I just left the caliper attached the bracket. My rotors were in good shape so it all just slid right off and back on without separately removing the calipers but that would have made it easier to hang the caliper while I was messing with the rest.
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Old 02-19-2019, 09:42 AM
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Great write-up OP. Thanks for sharing!
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Old 02-21-2019, 10:36 PM
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Thanks, for letting us know what to listen for I appreciate it.
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