2018 A-Spec reviews - AcuraZine - Acura Enthusiast Community



2018 A-Spec reviews

Reply
 
 
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 05-18-2017, 08:26 AM   #1
Registered Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Aug 2014
Location: MIAMI
Posts: 63
Thanked 38 Times in 15 Posts
2018 A-Spec reviews



So the embargo is up and now we can actually get full reviews on the 18 TLX model. I just watched the full Redline review and it gave me a little bit more excitement as I await my test drive for this model.
Ill let you guys watch for yourselves and make your own judgement but here are a couple of items that caught my attention from the review:

PROS:
-Engine is louder: for those of us that like to feel like "connection" with the engine. Seems like the TLX intake sound is louder this time around. Listen up.
-Seat thigh extender: good feature for those long trips and also seems like Acura implemented this feature better than competitors that leave a "gap" on the seat when the extender is used.
-Faster INFOTAINMENT: clicking and navigating through it does look a lot faste than previous versions
-Double screen: now this makes a lot of sense. Having two screens (specially now with car play) seems to be more user friendly.
-Quick Steering: video clearly shows a more sporty quick steering reaction. Listen to the reviewer's comments as well.
-CAR SOUNDS AWESOME! THAT "OLD SCHOOL HONDA FEEL" is present with this model: Yes...I know...this is the reviewer's opinion but Im sorry...I am a Honda guy and I couldnt help but to get excited and smiled as I heard this comments from a TLX model. The driving and the transmission actually looks like its fun again. Dont judge me :-)
-Sounds like the reviewer got 24 mpg CITY and 32 highway. Not bad for a v6 at all

...could it be? is the transmission finally tuned to match the desired performance of the car? (crosses fingers)

CONS:
-Tail Pipes:
its just an cosmetic item. The actual exhaust is not as big as it looks.
-No stitching on dashboard: This is subjective. But some people expect stitching for a luxury brand model.
-NAVI graphics: still look like the 90's. Acura is working on new graphics etc but this still looks very outdated
-No spare tire: Im old school..I like to be able to change a tire if i go flat. This is also subjectve but this is a a CON for me.
-NO 6 SPEED MANUAL: "gosh this car would be so much fun if it was 6 speed"-Redline Yes...now more than before I see why a manual model should be in Acura's plan. They seem t ohave done everything else right...but the 6 manual option.

Pricing is also revealed in this review, and since this is a sensitive topic when it comes to comparing cars (we all have different budgets!) I would just say that the value Acura brings with this model is extremely good. Considering all the features you are getting for a 40+k model.

All in all. I like it. I want to see this in a drak gray "graphite" color. Im excited to see it in person and cant wait for the actual test drive.

What do you guys think?

<iframe width="560" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/GSVOE07d3Dw" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>
Sloppy305 is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following 5 Users Say Thank You to Sloppy305 For This Useful Post:
a35tl (05-18-2017), CheeseyPoofs McNut (05-18-2017), Curious3GTL (05-18-2017), mapleloaf (05-19-2017), neuronbob (05-18-2017)
Old 05-18-2017, 09:18 AM   #2
Registered Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Posts: 866
Thanked 212 Times in 135 Posts
Those rims are really nice looking, they remind me of BMW rims.

That blue is also a beautiful color.
Curious3GTL is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to Curious3GTL For This Useful Post:
BEAR-AvHistory (05-18-2017)
Old 05-18-2017, 09:34 AM   #3
Registered Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Age: 32
Posts: 682
Thanked 76 Times in 61 Posts
Im so excited. My dealership will be getting a blue aspec sometime in the next week or 2, can't wait to see this in person!

Glad to see faster infotainment, new color blue, acurawatch standard, apple car play/android auto, and the aspec styling!

Your cons: No stiching on dash (oh well), yes graphics could be better but I'm ok with this personally, spare tire is an option you can get as accessory which is annoying you have to pay for it but if you look at other luxury brands its pretty standard now to do that, no 6 speed manual; would be fine to drive but realistically speaking no one buys manual anymore so its not worth building.
spoiler900 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-18-2017, 09:39 AM   #4
Moderator
 
CheeseyPoofs McNut's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2014
Location: Northern Ohio
Posts: 1,422
Thanked 845 Times in 390 Posts
Quote:
Originally Posted by Curious3GTL View Post
Those rims are really nice looking, they remind me of BMW rims.

That blue is also a beautiful color.
I'm not a fan of blue on a car but it does work here. And I agree - the rims are very nice. I think the back is a little busy but otherwise it's a great looking car.
I hope the ZF is indeed tuned better because the vast majority of drivers aren't going to leave it in sport+ all the time. He needed to drive it in normal mode and test the throttle response.
I like the seats too - very nice.
CheeseyPoofs McNut is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to CheeseyPoofs McNut For This Useful Post:
Curious3GTL (05-18-2017), slimm1469 (06-17-2017)
Old 05-18-2017, 10:14 AM   #5
Registered Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Posts: 866
Thanked 212 Times in 135 Posts
2018 Acura TLX Despite appearances, it's actually more than just a nose job.

Quote:
When Honda launched its Acura brand in the mid-1980s, it hit the streets strutting with a pair of sporty, luxury-leaning models powered by state-of-the-art engines. The Legend sedan’s SOHC 24-valve 2.5-liter V-6 was one of Honda’s first swings at the engine type, while the beloved and multiple 10Best Cars–winning Integra hatchback had a DOHC 16-valve 1.6-liter inline-four, racy stuff for 1986. Then Acura busted out the 1991 NSX, a four-wheeled aluminum ingot of speed that walked right up to the supercar gentry, tapped on their storied badges, and said, “Look what I can do.”

A decade on, however, Acura’s core mission seemed to have been lost in a haze of alphanumeric naming schemes, too-close-for-comfort rebadged Hondas, and SUV dreams. The showroom offerings had lost the spark and focus of the first-generation Acuras.

Today, the executives leading the company assure us that Acura has been through a period of deep introspection and is now working to restore its place in the automotive universe. The 2017 NSX was the first step, and the refreshed-for-2018 TLX sports sedan reviewed here is the follow-up.

Future Now

For starters, the TLX’s chrome-beaked front end has been restyled to include a genuine mesh grille. The front fenders have been reshaped and the V-6 model’s rear bumper resculpted. Engine choices are unchanged. Buyers may select either the 206-hp 2.4-liter inline-four mated to an eight-speed dual-clutch automatic transmission, which interestingly also employs a torque converter, or the 290-hp 3.5-liter V-6 paired with a conventional nine-speed automatic that has been reprogrammed for 2018. Premium fuel is recommended for both engines.

Front-wheel-drive models have Acura’s Precision All-Wheel Steer (P-AWS) as standard equipment, while its Super Handling All-Wheel Drive setup (SH-AWD) with torque vectoring now can be added to any V-6 model for a reasonable $2000. Previously, AWD required first selecting the Technology option package. The Tech package adds navigation and HD Radio with Digital Traffic to the 2.4-liter car; the V-6 model also gets contrast seat stitching, a powered thigh-support extender for the driver, and chrome doorsill trim.


Further simplifying things, the AcuraWatch suite of safety and driver-assistance features (lane-keeping assist, forward-collision warning, automated emergency braking, adaptive cruise control, lane-departure warning/mitigation) is standard across the entire lineup, as is a redesigned infotainment interface with Apple CarPlay and Android Auto compatibility. The infotainment still has the potentially confusing dual screens, but the lower, 7.0-inch display now has capacitive-touch operation. Acura claims a 30 percent faster response time, and while we can’t verify that stat, it felt subjectively quicker.

A-Spec Specs

We drove a TLX V-6 A-Spec with SH-AWD to see whether Acura’s renewed interest in “Precision Crafted Performance” is evident in what is essentially a midterm refresh of a vehicle that hasn’t left much of an impression since it arrived for 2015. The A-Spec is the one for folks who actually like to drive, positioned, in Acura’s words, “off to the side” of the TLX V-6 Tech and the comfort-and-feature-focused V-6 Advance. Interior features include “NSX-inspired” red or black leather seating with faux-suede trim, a chunky leather-wrapped steering wheel, ventilated front seats, and a wireless charging pad for portable devices. The exterior gets LED fog lamps, dark-chrome trim on the grille, matte-black window surrounds, a black decklid spoiler, and a full complement of A-Spec badges. The 2018 TLX is available in eight exterior colors, including the alluring A-Spec–exclusive Still Night Blue Pearl of our test vehicle. All nice touches, but the A-Spec’s sporting hardware was our primary concern. (Acura didn’t have any other versions of the car on hand for evaluation, but we’ll test them as soon as they’re available.)

The transformation begins with ditching the V-6 car’s standard 18-inch wheels and 50-series rubber for a set of 19-inch wheels shod with 40-series Michelin Primacy MXM4 V-rated tires. These A-Spec rims are 8.0 inches wide instead of 7.5. Dampers with revised valve tuning are teamed with higher spring rates and reworked bushings to deliver sharper responses and reduced body motions, says Acura. The rear anti-roll bar also gets a bump, increasing in diameter from 24.7 to 25.4 millimeters. Curiously, while all A-Spec TLXs get the firmer dampers, only AWD A-Specs get the firmer springs and the thicker anti-roll bar. The A-Spec’s electrically assisted power steering (a 15.1:1 rack ratio in AWD cars, 14.6:1 in two-wheel-drive models) has been modified for better on-center feel and to maintain responsiveness at speeds above 42 mph.

A More Accurate Acura

The cumulative effect of these changes is significant. The revised on-center tuning lends a refined touch and makes for truer straight-line tracking requiring fewer minute corrections than in any previous TLX we’ve driven. Turn-in, too, is sharper; the A-Spec responds quickly and accurately to inputs at any speed. The biggest revelation comes in long, high-speed sweepers where the car rewards looking deep into the turn with true tracking of even minimal steering inputs. At lower speeds, the SH-AWD system does a good job of apportioning torque fore and aft as well as across the rear axle to sharpen turn-in, letting the driver keep the pedal down without inducing squealing tires.

SH-AWD relies on an electronic brain that evaluates numerous parameters—engine torque, transmission gear, wheel speed, steering angle, lateral acceleration, yaw rate, and more—delivered from the relevant system ECUs to determine optimal torque distribution. Up to 90 percent can be sent forward during normal operation, and 70 percent can be shifted rearward when called on; the key to “super handling,” however, is the system’s ability to toggle 100 percent of the rear torque between the rear wheels. In operation it’s virtually seamless, requiring only a small initial leap of faith on the driver’s part before he or she is able to completely exploit its capabilities.

Pow-Pow Powertrains

As mentioned, little has changed with the V-6 and its attendant transmission. Acceleration is brisk, with 290 horsepower and 267 lb-ft of torque from the naturally aspirated V-6; we’ve measured 5.7 seconds for the zero-to-60-mph run from a pre-update model. There are four driving modes: Econ, Normal, and Sport provide smooth, unobtrusive operation, while Sport+ switches to the most aggressive mapping and holds gears longer in all situations. Ratios are stacked tightly, making it fun to employ the wheel-mounted paddle shifters. Sport+ switches to manual mode with the first tug of a lever and holds it until the driver instructs otherwise; it also allows for double downshifts. In the less aggressive settings, the transmission returns to drive after a few moments of inactivity. Numerous algorithms run in the background, optimizing transmission operation to suppress upshifts during spirited cornering and to hold gears while climbing and descending steep grades. If it sounds like a lot of electronic tomfoolery that will only try to put a lid on the fun, we’re here to tell you that’s not the case.

The A-Spec we drove had delightfully little wind and road noise in the cabin, thanks in part to the Active Noise Control system. Other audio tricks—and less desirable ones in our book—include adding a more ruffian growl to the engine soundtrack in Sport and Sport+ modes and, in the A-Spec, increasing engine noise in the cabin by up to four decibels, says Acura. We like engine sounds, but we prefer them to be real.

Acura seems to be rediscovering the balance and flow that makes a vehicle engaging to drive. The real question is how much people will pay for it. The 2018 TLX line will go on sale in June and start at $34K, but stepping into an AWD A-Spec will cost $45,750, territory occupied by the usual gang of entry-level European sports-sedan competitors. The Acura makes a more compelling case for itself than before, however, with a chassis that is better at facilitating a good time.
Pictures here: 2018 Acura TLX - Photo Gallery | Car and Driver
Curious3GTL is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to Curious3GTL For This Useful Post:
9SpeedTran (05-18-2017), neuronbob (05-18-2017), Speed_Racer (05-18-2017)
Old 05-18-2017, 12:09 PM   #6
Senior Moderator
 
neuronbob's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2001
Location: Cleveland area, OH
Posts: 18,839
Thanked 3,208 Times in 1,613 Posts
Good news. Better than expected. Potential contender for my next car. We'll see. Features are on par with my RLX (I've got a 2014, so no 360 degree cameras, etc, that didn't come until 2016 on the RLX).
neuronbob is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-18-2017, 12:11 PM   #7
MASTER CAR BULIDER
 
BEAR-AvHistory's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: NC - USA
Age: 75
Posts: 4,452
Thanked 979 Times in 577 Posts
Quote:
Originally Posted by Curious3GTL View Post
Those rims are really nice looking, they remind me of BMW rims.
Yah Think? Think the new TLX looks very nice in the picture, would like to see it in Graphite.

2014 435.

Last edited by BEAR-AvHistory; 05-18-2017 at 12:16 PM.
BEAR-AvHistory is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-18-2017, 12:19 PM   #8
Moderator
iTrader: (1)
 
justnspace's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Posts: 74,325
Thanked 13,007 Times in 9,633 Posts
watched the vid and enjoyed the aspec version. Acura should have led with that back in 2015....as that looks closely in-line with the concept
justnspace is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 05-18-2017, 12:40 PM   #9
You'll Never Walk Alone
iTrader: (1)
 
iforyou's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: Vancouver, BC, Canada
Age: 30
Posts: 8,654
Thanked 483 Times in 329 Posts
The styling is seriously growing on me. And these reviews have been quite positive. Definitely not bad for a facelift!
iforyou is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-18-2017, 12:52 PM   #10
Senior Moderator
 
neuronbob's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2001
Location: Cleveland area, OH
Posts: 18,839
Thanked 3,208 Times in 1,613 Posts
I hope the OP doesn't mind, but I changed the title so that A-Spec reviews can be placed here.

Automobile Magazine:
2018 Acura TLX SH-AWD A-Spec First Drive Review | Automobile Magazine

Quote:
Originally Posted by Automobile Magazine
While Acura has had its share of successes over the years it’s also no secret that Honda’s luxury arm has struggled to carve out its own identity. But thanks to the brand’s latest tagline, “Precision Crafted Performance,” and the buzz generated by its magnificent Acura NSX hybrid supercar (one of our 2017 AUTOMOBILE All-Stars) there’s renewed optimism and a sense of mission.

But slogans and an expensive, low volume super sports car will only get you so far. Acura has some work to do to its largely Accord-based lineup if it wants to be known for performance andcraftsmanship. One of the first attempts at meeting the brand’s fresh mantra is the A-Spec version of the 2018 Acura TLX we recently had a chance to hustle around Kentucky bluegrass country.

Before you get overly excited, this is a mildly sporty rework of the TLX’s midrange Tech variant, featuring a more aggressive appearance inside and out and some mild suspension updates. While it can be had in FWD and AWD flavors, the latter is inarguably the better handling of the two. Acura’s SH-AWD system has been a brand highlight for several years and its torque vectoring helps to better direct the car in tight cornering maneuvers.

Under the hood is the same 3.5-liter V-6 found in the rest of the TLX range (the A-Spec is not offered with the entry 2.4-liter I-4). It makes the same 290 hp and 267 lb-ft of torque and is mated to the same 9-speed automatic transmission. It’s a solid but unremarkable combination that gets the car to 60 mph in around six seconds without much fuss or drama. There’s also a bit more sonic flavor emanating from the A-Spec version thanks to the revised tuning of the car’s Active Sound Control System, which is said to smooth out the engine note by sending a same- or reverse-phase sound signal through the speakers as needed.

Exterior wise, while the TLX A-Spec isn’t the first model to shed Acura’s old beak nose (those honors went to the 2017 MDX), it thankfully won’t be the last. It looks best in its exclusive Still Night Blue Pearl paint (also on offer are black, white, ‘steel,’ and red). Regardless of color choice, it looks better than the range-topping TLX Advance thanks to the use of black and body color trim and a better flowing rear fascia design, accented by integrated circular exhausts. It also rolls on a 19-inch rim and tire package as standard equipment.

In the cabin, the TLX A-Spec is offered with a choice of two exclusive interior schemes: black with Alcantara, and red leather. All of the cars on hand had the black interior, which projects more of an athletic aura. Unfortunately, none of that athleticism is transferred over to the dash, which is lacking in flair. In particular, the large slab of black in front of the passenger brings down the ambiance of the entire space. Also, curiously, the door panel inserts are surprisingly hard, as if they’re attached directly to the panel without any padding.

On the plus side of the ledger is the 2018 TLX’s infotainment system. It features better hardware behind the scenes and is the first to use Acura’s new capacitive touch screen and an easier-to-navigate menu structure. The A-Spec’s thicker steering wheel that’s more satisfying to hold and more in tune with the car’s sporting intentions than the unit in the TLX Advance I sampled.

Turning the wheel is more smile-inducing as well thanks to somewhat increased resistance and noticeably improved turn-in. The A-Spec felt slightly more planted and balanced along the mellow turns of the Ohio River Scenic Byway, as did my torso thanks to the stronger bolsters in the A-Spec’s sport seats. How much of that handling improvement is due to the small bumps in spring rate and anti-roll bar stiffness and how much is due to the A-Spec’s larger and stickier 245/40R19 Michelin Primacy MXM4 all-seasons is known only to Acura’s engineers.

There’s a downside to the new rubber, though, as there’s noticeably more tire noise in the TLX A-Spec. Unsurprisingly, it rides rougher than its TLX brethren as a result. The A-Spec also has to make do without certain tech and luxury features thanks to Honda’s aversion to option packages. Goodies not available for the A-Spec include a surround view camera, heated rear seats, heated steering wheel, and heated windshield.


Still, the A-Spec is otherwise well-equipped and from an enthusiast perspective at least is the most compelling member of the TLX stable. However, with its $45,750 price tag, the AWD A-Spec is swimming in seriously shark-infested waters (the FWD A-Spec starts at $43,750, but the idea feels as pointless as a FWD Audi S-line). Yes, it’s a sharper version of the TLX, which makes it a better upgrade option for upwardly mobile, enthusiastic V-6 Accord owners, but doesn’t necessarily make it any more likely to peel sales away from, say, the Germans.

But as is the case with halo cars like the NSX, there are other things at stake than incremental volume. As important, if not more so, is the signal cars like the 2018 TLX A-Spec send to the market that Acura is serious about moving in a performance-oriented direction. The key now will be to follow up with future product that truly underscores that — a TLX Sport Hybrid or TLX Type S if you will. While every person on hand with an Acura business card in Louisville stayed properly mum, it’s a logical development — one supported by various winks and nudges. If one is, in fact, being worked on, learnings from the A-Spec will no doubt help engineers get it right.
neuronbob is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-18-2017, 12:57 PM   #11
Senior Moderator
 
neuronbob's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2001
Location: Cleveland area, OH
Posts: 18,839
Thanked 3,208 Times in 1,613 Posts
Motor Authority:
2018 Acura TLX A-Spec first drive review: character by committee

Quote:
Originally Posted by Motor Authority
A jack of all trades, the 2018 Acura TLX is so balanced it fades among more daring, extroverted rivals.

A mid-cycle update rather than a full-scale redesign, the 2018 Acura TLX hammers yet another nail in the coffin of Acura's hated shield grille. The new grille stretches more horizontally and sits higher on the front bumper. It looks lighter as a result, and gives the TLX a face that begs to be seen in person.

The rest of Acura's exterior changes are much subtler. A new bumper here, taillights there, and bigger tires headline the updates. The result of this work is neither conservative nor too flashy. Want flashy? Acura is happy to accommodate with the new TLX A-Spec.

In the same vein as Lexus' F-Sport line and BMW's M Sport packages, the A-Spec offers style upgrades designed to give the TLX a more sporty look. It works.

A jack of all trades, the 2018 Acura TLX is so balanced it fades among more daring, extroverted rivals.

A mid-cycle update rather than a full-scale redesign, the 2018 Acura TLX hammers yet another nail in the coffin of Acura's hated shield grille. The new grille stretches more horizontally and sits higher on the front bumper. It looks lighter as a result, and gives the TLX a face that begs to be seen in person.

The rest of Acura's exterior changes are much subtler. A new bumper here, taillights there, and bigger tires headline the updates. The result of this work is neither conservative nor too flashy. Want flashy? Acura is happy to accommodate with the new TLX A-Spec.

In the same vein as Lexus' F-Sport line and BMW's M Sport packages, the A-Spec offers style upgrades designed to give the TLX a more sporty look. It works.

The TLX A-Spec's grille is matte black instead of gloss and wears a black chrome surround instead of a traditional chrome finish. The side sills and rear spoiler are more prominent and the 19-inch wheels look great.

Let's talk about the absurd exhaust outlets. Acura integrated the 4-inch pipes into the rear fascia and the result opens our drool valve. The A-Spec's rear bumper looks so good, I don't even care that the exhaust outlets aren't functional. Peek inside one and it's clear that the actual pipe never even touches these artillery-sized outlets.

The standard TLX's cabin is largely unchanged from the last time around. There's a reskinned infotainment system that now includes Apple CarPlay and Android Auto, as well as ambient light piping along the sides of the center console and a new seat design on V-6 models.

The A-Spec treatment is just as dramatic inside. Black leather and Alcantara upholstery lend a subtle sporty whiff; another color scheme wears red leather with in-your-face confidence. Add a sport steering wheel, Alcantara door inserts, and new dash trim, and the TLX A-Spec's cabin turns up the sporty wick.

Beyond the interior and exterior changes, the TLX A-Spec promises only mild hardware improvements.

Wider tires and narrower sidewalls—245/40s on standard 19-inch wheels versus 225/50s on standard 18s—are supposed to improve grip and increase feedback through the steering wheel. Stiffer front and rear springs and firmer dampers can keep the restyled TLX's body more composed. Finally, a thicker, larger-diameter rear sway bar should give the TLX more neutral handling and quicker turn-in.

Words like "should" and "can" are on purpose; I just couldn't notice a difference between the two setups on the road. There may be some empirical difference in a controlled environment, like a test track, but i drove it on twisty roads outside Louisville, Kentucky. I'd fail a Pepsi Challenge between the TLX and TLX A-Spec. The detailed specs agree: the numbers are so incremental year-over-year that only accountants and ants will notice.

While I can't really spot a difference in the A-Spec's handling versus the standard model, the same is mostly true of its ride comfort. Acura's sporty TLX feels nearly as comfortable on freeways and surface streets as the standard model. I say “nearly” because going to a larger wheel and skinnier sidewalls will always impact ride comfort. There's a little more road noise, but it's far from a deal breaker.

So no, the sport-tuned suspension on the Acura TLX A-Spec isn't a huge departure from stock—which is almost certainly true of its rivals, too—and yet, this is still a fun vehicle to fling around. The Acura isn't as sharp as a 3-Series, A4, C-Class, or IS, but it's also more forgiving.

And will any of this matter to the folks that snap up the A-Spec? Not in the least. The thicker grips on the steering wheel, the slightly flat-bottom-like shape, and small bits of extra bolstering in the seat create an enjoyable impression of sportiness even if the actual performance doesn't stack up. The TLX A-Spec isn't much more dynamically capable than the standard model, but it does a better job of putting its driver in the mood for fun.

The A-Spec's upgraded Active Sound Control is a big part of that. ASC hushes up the engine noise in Econ or Normal driving mode and allows more noise into the cabin in Sport and Sport +. Best of all, ASC doesn't sound artificial, like the Lexus IS 350. The A-Spec's singing voice is a reward to the ears, with a rich, sonorous V-6 engine intake note that makes aggressive driving even more entertaining.

Yes, a V-6. The A-Spec is only available with the TLX's bigger, heavier, more powerful engine. My Motor Authority colleagues have raved about the 2.4-liter 4-cylinder in the more affordable TLX, but I don't mind the V-6 as much. Its 290 horsepower and 267 pound-feet of torque are accessible enough at low speeds and willing enough at higher speeds to make up for the extra heft and its effect on balance. And with the upgraded ASC, it sounds fantastic.

Likewise, there's been plenty of support for the base 8-speed dual-clutch transmission with almost as much derision reserved for the 9-speed automatic. Acura says it upgraded the ZF-built transmission for 2018, and it's better, to a point. The 9-speed feels responsive off the line, but there are too many gears to swipe through with the smallish, steering-wheel-mounted paddles to get the engine speed where I want it. Moreover, those shifts aren't super-fast.

Prices for the 2018 TLX start at $33,995 (including a mandatory $995 destination charge), but the cheapest A-Spec model starts at $43,795 for a front-wheel-drive example. Add $2,000 for an A-Spec with Super-Handling All-Wheel Drive. For that price, not only do you get all the A-Spec goodies, but the TLX A-Spec comes with a neat mix of equipment from the pricier Advance trim, which costs $950 more. That includes navigation with real-time traffic, a 10-speaker ELS stereo, heated front and rear seats, wireless phone charging, and LED foglights. You'll be missing out on the Advance's heated steering wheel, ventilated front seats, or surround-view camera system, though. That's a lot of important equipment for a $950 savings and a negligibly sportier driving experience.

The TLX A-Spec doesn't feel more exciting than the standard car. While that's disappointing, the reality is that this new trim presents a fresh new style and exciting design elements without upsetting the balance that makes Acura's bread-and-butter sedan such a compelling alternative and all-around good choice in a competitive and progressive segment. If you want a relaxing luxury sedan that will stand out better among the hordes of Germans and Lexus' popular IS, the TLX A-Spec is a fine choice.
neuronbob is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to neuronbob For This Useful Post:
slimm1469 (05-30-2017)
Old 05-18-2017, 01:02 PM   #12
Senior Moderator
 
neuronbob's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2001
Location: Cleveland area, OH
Posts: 18,839
Thanked 3,208 Times in 1,613 Posts
Motor Trend
2018 Acura TLX First Drive Review: Luxury AND Logic

Quote:
Originally Posted by Motor Trend
Luxury isn’t logical. Every Toyota Corolla includes LED headlights and active safety tech, yet the cheap, slow compact would never be considered by someone seeking a name-brand compact luxury sedan. But luxury isn’t just about features—sometimes you pay more for a less spacious car with fewer standard features because of how it drives and because you want to be associated with the brand. The refreshed 2018 Acura TLXattempts to strike a balance between luxury and logic, with updates that strengthen the value Acuras have often had while adding an emotional pull some recent models have lacked. We drove the 2018 TLX to determine where the Acura fits in an overwhelming segment with more than 10 choices.

Every 2018 Acura TLX, from the base model four-cylinder to the six-cylinder A-Spec and Advance-package cars, comes with an impressive amount of standard equipment for a luxury sport sedan. The car starts at $33,950 and includes LED headlights, Android Auto and Apple CarPlay compatibility, a proximity key, heated front seats, an electric parking brake with auto brake hold, and adaptive safety tech. If your smartphone will work with Android Auto or Apple CarPlay, you effectively have an in-car navigation system anywhere your phone has reception, too. Active safety tech isn’t for everyone, but like the HID headlights on my personal first-generation Acura TSX, it’s the kind of thing you might appreciate after driving with it for a while, from the 2018 TLX’s collision mitigation braking system to the lane keeping assist system that can help you stay in your lane on a highway or two-lane road.

Beyond the addition of a few new features, the 2018 TLX’s major changes are bolder styling details, the sportier A-Spec model, and colorful brand-boosting ads that remind viewers the front-drive sedan is made by the same company that brought us the advanced NSX hybrid supercar. The TLX’s interesting diamond pentagon grille is an improvement over the more chrome-filled 2015-2017 model’s look, yet besides the front and rear fascia changes, the car is still on the more conservative side. That’s mostly good—it means that, except for maybe the A-Spec model, you’ll probably feel the same way you do about the 2018 TLX’s styling today as you will 10 years from now.

Although the 2018 TLX has lots of new features and updated styling, the engines and transmissions remain the same. The base car remains front-drive only, with a naturally aspirated 2.4-liter I-4 producing 206 hp and 182 lb-ft of torque, mated to an eight-speed dual-clutch automatic. Like the front-drive V-6 models, all-wheel-drive TLXs are powered by a 3.5-liter naturally aspirated V-6 good for 290 hp and 267 lb-ft of torque, mated to a nine-speed automatic. Sixty percent of TLX customers are expected to go with a V-6 model over the I-4, and that makes sense if you’re comparing the TLX to a BMW 330i and Audi A4 2.0T instead of a BMW 320i, Audi A4 Ultra, or even a loaded Honda Accord V-6. The 2018 TLX’s V-6 engine won’t produce its peak power and torque as low in the rev range as turbocharged four-cylinder competitors, but it will sound better as you make your way across that highway on-ramp.

Even with the new 2018 TLX A-Spec model, whose Active Sound Cancellation system is tuned to pump up the engine sound above 4,000 rpm, the V-6 never shouts and always sounds refined. The A-Spec model represents a more involved effort from Acura than the ILX A-Spec, which mostly enhances that car’s already good looks. The TLX A-Spec is offered on front- and all-wheel-drive V-6 models, and rides on slightly fatter 245/40 R19 tires with dark-painted 19-inch wheels (compared to the regular V-6’s 225/50 R18 tires and 18-inch wheels). The steering and suspension systems are also retuned, and exterior and interior badges accompany the more aggressive styling touches and larger exhaust outlets.

On the road, you really can tell a difference between a 2018 TLX A-Spec and a non-A-Spec V-6 car. It’s subtle, but the TLX A-Spec’s suspension is firmer (but still everyday-livable), and the steering feels tighter, with slightly greater effort. No, the A-Spec car doesn’t make any more power than the other V-6 models, but we tested a 2015 TLX with all-wheel drive and the same engine/transmission combination hitting 60 mph in a respectable 5.9 seconds. As for the four-cylinder model, we’ve tested a 2015 TLX 2.4 reaching 60 mph in 7.2 seconds. On a winding road in a 2017 TLX recently, I found the 206-hp engine plenty powerful for driving on winding roads, and I appreciated its surprising snarl in Sport+ mode. We look forward to track testing 2018 TLX variants, including the A-Spec variant, to see how their performance has changed.

Having previously driven a 2017 TLX V-6 with all-wheel drive, I noticed the nine-speed auto in the 2018 TLX V-6 was better behaved during a day I spent with the updated cars. Hopefully this reflects the multiple minor improvements Acura tells us it has made since the V-6/nine-speed combination first appeared on the 2015 TLX, though it will take another few years to see any potential improvements in quality and reliability surveys. What remained consistent on the 2017 and 2018 TLXs I drove was the brake feel—there was a bit too much travel in the pedal before any actual slowing down happens.

With Acura carrying over the TLX’s engines and transmissions, EPA-rated fuel economy is expected to remain about the same. We don’t yet have the 2018 TLX’s official ratings, but the 2017 TLX came in at 24/35 mpg city/highway with the four-cylinder version, 21/34 mpg with the 2017 TLX V-6 FWD, and 21/31 mpg on the 2017 TLX V-6 AWD. Those are average numbers if you’re comparing the TLX to turbo-four-powered compact luxury sport sedans. The 2017 Audi A4 2.0T scoots from 0 to 60 mph in just 5.0 seconds, yet is EPA-rated at 24/31, three mpg better than the equivalent 2017 TLX in the city. The front-drive 2017 A4 2.0T is rated 25/33 and the 2017 Mercedes-Benz C300, which we tested in rear-drive form reaching 60 mph in 6.0 seconds, is rated 24/34 mpg (or 24/31 with all-wheel drive).

Neither of those German competitors have the Acura’s polarizing infotainment solution of two stacked screens. This is a layout we’ve seen on the prerefresh TLX, but it’s better executed now, with a lower screen that’s 30 percent quicker (and feels that way) as well as an Apple CarPlay integration that includes the ability to use the steering wheel’s voice-command button. On that lower screen, the controls for the HVAC system as well as the heated and available ventilated front seats are always visible, so making a change is easy. If you don’t understand why you’d want two screens, consider that the top screen can display a map, Apple CarPlay/Android Auto info, or fuel economy stats while the bottom one shows audio and HVAC system details. Another screen is sandwiched between the two instrument cluster gauges that are functional but not particularly modern or upscale.

From the front or rear seats, you might appreciate the new contrasting seat piping that’s offered on most six-cylinder TLX sedans and standard on the TLX A-Spec. The detail is included on a new comfortable seat design and, overall, Acura offers the luxury of choice with a six interior colors. The most upscale is a new saddle-brown-like color called Espresso that’s only offered on non-A-Spec V-6 models. The A-Spec gets a choice between black leather with Alcantara inserts and white piping and an option the development team worked hard to get approved: red leather. Like many cars in this class, rear-seat space is adequate for two passengers in the outboard rear seats, which can now be optioned with heating controls.

Value remains the best reason to buy a TLX, but with the 2018 model going on sale in June, it’s far from the only one. The A-Spec variant is more fun to drive and showy than other TLXs have ever been before, yet each model would make a good commuter. Fuel efficiency and brand status aren’t the car’s strong suits, but the 2018 TLX is more worthy of consideration than it’s been before. And with standard active safety tech, you’ll experience features that might have been out of reach on nonloaded first-tier luxury brand alternatives.
neuronbob is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-18-2017, 01:11 PM   #13
Senior Moderator
 
neuronbob's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2001
Location: Cleveland area, OH
Posts: 18,839
Thanked 3,208 Times in 1,613 Posts
AutoWeek
2018 Acura TLX review: All the details on Acura's compact luxury sedan
Quote:
Originally Posted by AutoWeek
Hoping to kick-start sales and show it still cares about sedans, Acura updated its TLX sedan for 2018. The changes are minor: some new sheetmetal up front, new bumper covers and a revamped media system. Acura hopes it’ll excite customers enough to consider the brand -- and to entice driving enthusiasts, Acura brings back the sporty A-Spec trim to the lineup.

A-Spec is a nod to Acura’s performance roots but without much in the way of performance gains. The trim is mostly superficial. While it’s not as aggressive as an AMG-massaged Mercedes-Benz, it does get you different bumpers and larger wheels with wider tires: The base TLX V6 comes standard with 18-inch alloys sporting a 225-series tire, which becomes 19-inch alloys wrapped with 245-series rubber in A-Spec trim.

Despite the turbo engines coming from corporate parent Honda, none of Acura's TLX sedans get forced induction. Acura brass thinks there’s no need to replace displacement. In base trim, the TLX sports a 206-hp 2.4-liter direct-injected I4. Stepping up to the direct-injected 3.5-liter V6 gets you 84 more ponies for a total of 290 hp.

For the Acura faithful, all the brand's acronyms are present: precision all-wheel steering, or P-AWS, along with super-handling all-wheel drive, SH-AWD; the latter is only available on V6 models. You could potentially buy a TLX A-Spec P-AWS SH-AWD. Hopefully, the trunk lid will fit all those letters.

Acura is also trying to sweeten the TLX’s pot by making its driver assistance package, AcuraWatch, standard equipment. That means you won’t have to check an extra box (and spend extra money) to get forward collision warning, lane keeping assist or adaptive cruise control, even if you want a base TLX.

The Execution

Though no I4 TLX models were available to test, the naturally aspirated V6 scoots this sedan along with gusto. If you want to row your own gears, you’ll have to look elsewhere. The V6 comes with a nine-speed automatic, and the I4 is mated to an eight-speed dual-clutch.

While using the paddles isn’t as fun as throwing a stick around, they are a good stopgap. The shifts aren’t lighting quick like the PDK you'll find in a Porsche, but they’re fast enough to get it out of slushbox territory. Of course, you’ll have to use the strange Acura gear selector to hop into reverse and park. Unlike your average T-handle in the center console, Acura’s calling card is a push-button gear selector, with a slide to engage reverse. You’ll get used to it with time, but you might struggle in your first few hours.

Like most in the class, Acura has variable drive modes to adjust shift points and engine performance. These modes include economy, comfort, sport and sport-plus. Obviously, sport and sport-plus delay the shifts and make the engine more apt to wind out for spirited driving. While that’s all good, the real perk is in the steering. If you’re in econ or comfort mode, the steering feels like a Honda, super-lightweight. Switching to sport-plus makes it much heavier. The added weight helps make inputs more precise but doesn’t help with the numb feeling you get from electrically boosted steering.

Suspending the TLX is a pair of MacPherson struts in front and a multi-link setup in the back. It’s not as sharp as a double-wishbone system, but it does a good job keeping the rubber stuck to the road. The ride is comfortable, even with the more sporty A-Spec tuning, but stays flat during cornering. You’ll notice potholes, sure, but they won’t rattle your teeth out.

Combine that with the A-Spec’s wider tire and the SH-AWD system, and the TLX suddenly becomes a formidable canyon carver. It’s no M3 or AMG C63, but feels better than the rest of the Japanese competition. Braking, too, is solid, and the nose doesn’t bite the ground during emergency stops.

Those emergency stops should happen less often, thanks to the standard AcuraWatch safety suite and the two-screen media system with Apple CarPlay and Android Auto. Acura says the entire system is 30 percent faster and more streamlined than what you’ll currently find at dealers, but in the real world, that’s hard to notice. Aside from some quirks like needing to be at a full stop to connect your phone and activate Apple CarPlay, the system works well.

The Takeaway

With the newly refreshed and best-selling MDX parked next to the TLX at Acura dealers, it’s hard to say if a refresh -- even a good one -- will lure buyers into a sedan. For those shopping for a near-luxury car, however, Acura delivers a satisfying sports-sedan drive at a downright bargain price; TLX owners won’t feel out of place parking it next to an Audi A4 or Mercedes C-Class. The TLX won’t cure America’s addiction to crossovers, but it’s definitely a step in the right direction.
neuronbob is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-18-2017, 01:24 PM   #14
Senior Moderator
 
neuronbob's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2001
Location: Cleveland area, OH
Posts: 18,839
Thanked 3,208 Times in 1,613 Posts
AutoGuide
2018 Acura TLX Review - AutoGuide.com News

Quote:
Originally Posted by AutoGuide
What else is there to say about the Acura TLX, a premium sedan that’s been significantly reworked for 2018? It’s a respectable all-arounder that’s free of any deal-breaking flaws, even if it fails to truly thrill.

Like an automotive Goldilocks, this important four-door is nestled between the compact ILX and full-size RLX, competing with industry heavyweights like the Lexus IS, BMW 3 Series and Audi A4, to name a trio of adversaries.

Sharing foundational underpinnings with the capable Honda Accord, this front-drive-based sedan has been improved significantly for the new model year, with fresh exterior styling being the TLX’s most obvious change. Their divisive “shield grille” has, at last, been jettisoned in favor of a new motif, which debuted on the Precision Concept a year or so ago.

In addition to its handsome new “diamond pentagon” grille, this car’s fenders, fascias, fog lights and filigree have been spruced up for 2018. The overall look is fetching, if not quite lust worthy.

Curiously, only the 2018 TLX sedan and MDX utility vehicle have gained the brand’s starburst face; even the Acura NSX supercar features the old beak-like front end. Still, such an obvious difference hasn’t dulled the halo surrounding this hybrid supercar, which draws untold masses to Acura’s website. When window shoppers are done fantasizing about NSX ownership, the No. 1 vehicle they view afterward is the TLX sedan, something that bodes well for this premium four-door.

Providing a tangible if tenuous connection to its exotic stablemate is a newly minted A-Spec trim, which provides more engaging dynamics and a more aggressive design.

Among other tweaks, these V6-powered cars are set apart from mainstream TLXs with new bumpers and fog lights, dark chrome accents as well as unique 19-inch wheels with high-performance all-season tires.

A-Spec models can be had in five different exterior colors. Arguably the most arresting is an exclusive hue called Still Night Blue Pearl, which looks absolutely radiant, especially in bright sunlight.

Beneath the skin, a few noteworthy engineering changes have been made. The electrically boosted power steering’s ratio has been quickened, its spring and dampers retuned and the rear stabilizer bar adjusted, all to improve grip and reduce body roll.

For better or worse, these models feature essentially the same interior as mainline TLXs, with a few minor changes. The dashboard and door skins are made of a utilitarian soft plastic that’s suitably squishy if not particularly upscale. The leather is smooth and controls free of friction. Inspiring owner confidence, everything feels like it’s built for the rigors of a long-term relationship.

The A-Spec’s bolstered front buckets are commendably comfortable, as is the rear bench, which can accommodate six-foot-tall passengers thanks to its generous legroom. As for the trunk, it clocks in at 14.3 cubic feet (405 liters), a bit more than you get in major rivals like the ATS (10.4 cubic feet, 294 liters), C-Class (12.6 cubic feet, 357 liters) or A4 (13.0 cubic feet, 368 liters).

A-Spec cars also gain interior accent lighting as well as black headliner and pillar trim. Depending on your interior color choice, racy-looking red leather is available. Another welcome upgrade is a steering wheel with a meatier rim. Thanks to these enhancements and more, Acura estimates about 20 percent of TLXs will be dressed to impress in A-Spec trim, which is available for about $46,000 including destination in the U.S.

Natural Aspiration

As before, two engines are offered in the TLX. Economy-minded drivers can stick with the base 2.4-liter four-cylinder. Rated at a somewhat meager 206 horses and 182 lb-ft of twist, this engine is matched solely to an eight-speed dual-clutch automatic transmission, which sends torque exclusively to the front wheels. Even though official consumption figures are not available, this should be quite an efficient drivetrain combination.

If you want more speed or crave four-corner traction, Acura once again offers a V6 in its updated luxury sports sedan. With a lung capacity of 3.5-liters, this option is rated at a class competitive 290 horsepower and 267 lb-ft of torque. It’s paired with a nine-speed automatic transmission; a manual is no longer offered, not just in the TLX but any Acura.

Drivers of six-cylinder cars can opt for Super Handling All-Wheel Drive. Enhancing the car’s road-holding capability, this system not only distributes torque between the front and rear wheels based on demand, it also shuffles twist left or right at the back as required, which can, among other things, help mitigate the wet blanket of driving dynamics: understeer.

Again, official fuel consumption has not been published, but for reference, the 2017 all-wheel-drive V6-powered TLX is rated at 21 miles per gallon around town (11.2 L/100 km) and 31 on the highway (7.5 L/100 km).

Standard Technology

One important area where the 2018 model leads rivals is in standard equipment. Every version comes with LED exterior lighting, including the headlamps, which are high-tech affairs comprised of numerous individual elements. A multi-view backup camera, hill-start assist, dual-zone climate control and a power moonroof are also included at no extra cost.

But a generous serving of cutting-edge electronics is what really helps this car pull ahead. Aside from all the previously mentioned goodies, Apple CarPlay and Android Auto are standard; ditto for keyless entry. In addition to this, every TLX is equipped with AcuraWatch, the brand’s suite of advanced driver-assistance technologies. This includes popular and useful features like adaptive cruise control, lane-keeping assist, collision mitigation braking and more. To be clear, all of this is standard on even the most affordable TLX, which is priced from roughly $34,000 including delivery in the U.S. None of its rivals offer all that for so little.

Another surprisingly useful feature is this sports sedan’s infotainment system. In years past, Acura’s offerings have been rather difficult to use, but not anymore.

The brand’s updated On Demand Multi-Information Display (ODMD 2.0 for short) has a reworked user interface that’s dramatically easier to decipher, plus it’s estimated to be 30 percent quicker than its predecessor, an improvement that’s immediately noticeable.

While I still prefer hardware buttons for things like the climate controls, this two-screen infotainment system is nonetheless pleasant to use, providing some unexpected benefits. The lower one is a capacitive touchscreen that spans seven inches. Handling audio and climate functions, it’s easy enough to navigate and even simpler to reach.

Higher on the dashboard is a colorful eight-inch unit that’s operated via a control knob on the dashboard. The advantage of this arrangement compared to single-screen systems is that you can have two things going at once, with, say, audio controls showing on the lower screen and a map up top.The Drive

The most pleasant part of this A-Spec Acura’s driving experience is probably its husky steering. The tiller has a more heft to it than the standard car’s, which helps it feel more playful.

As mentioned, the TLX shares basic underpinnings with the Accord but that’s not necessarily a bad thing. Its structure seems absolutely inflexible. By weight, 52 percent of the body-in-white is constructed of high-strength steel, with six different grades being used. Helping trim some fat, a few lightweight aluminum and magnesium components are thrown in for good measure.

This rigidity gives the TLX a feeling of refinement that one expects in the luxury segment. It’s quiet, unexpectedly smooth and free of any annoying shudders or rattles when driving over rough surfaces. Everything is solid and screwed together with precision.

Toss this sports sedan into a turn and the body remains level even if the tires protest your need to corner with such urgency. During such maneuvers, you can feel the all-wheel-drive system shuffling torque around to keep the nose pointed in the direction you want (read: away from the ditch or oncoming traffic).

With 290 horses on tap, the TLX is quick enough for a car of this caliber. The engine is exceptionally refined, emitting a snarly rasp as the revs build, though much of this sound is synthesized, broadcast through the audio system.

Surprisingly, the 3.5-liter V6 doesn’t pull with real urgency until the tachometer needle hits about 5,000 rpm, then it sprints to redline with vigor. You’d expect the nine-speed transmission to keep it cookin’ at all times, but this gearbox is one of the more recalcitrant units on the market today. It’s particularly reluctant to downshift. In the Normal driving mode, you can bury the accelerator at, say, 45 miles an hour and it takes the gearbox a couple seconds to select a lower ratio; the wait is agonizing, and it hardly improves when you put it in “Sport” or “Sport+” modes.

The shift quality of this ZF-sourced transmission is generally pretty good, unlike other vehicular applications. In the TLX it’s just unwilling to cooperate at times, which is unfortunate.

The Verdict: 2018 Acura TLX Review

So, that’s what can be said about the 2018 Acura TLX A-Spec. There’s no single captivating reason to buy this car, but if you’ve got the means, neither are there any significant strikes against it. A Cadillac ATS is probably more fun to drive (and can still be had with a manual gearbox), the Mercedes-Benz C-Class is more luxurious inside, and Infiniti’s Q50 is far more sensual to behold, but the TLX is entirely competent, bringing a unique value proposition to market thanks to its impressive list of standard features in addition to the brand’s historically strong quality. This solid and respectable Acura four-door goes on sale June 1, so look for it at dealerships in just a couple short weeks.

Last edited by neuronbob; 05-18-2017 at 01:27 PM.
neuronbob is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-18-2017, 01:30 PM   #15
Registered Idiot
 
DBConz's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Boston, MA
Age: 36
Posts: 107
Thanked 5 Times in 4 Posts
do those rotors seem small to anyone else?
DBConz is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-18-2017, 02:50 PM   #16
Midnight Marauder
 
jwong77's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2002
Location: San Jose, CA
Posts: 728
Thanked 49 Times in 38 Posts
Wow I was a total hater when I first saw it, but I really like it now. The blue is fantastic!
jwong77 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-18-2017, 02:53 PM   #17
I love tacos
 
TacoBello's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2014
Location: In an igloo
Posts: 24,259
Thanked 3,439 Times in 2,580 Posts
I find it silly the reviewers where hating on the exhaust tips. They are exactly what other manufacturers have been doing for many years now, and are still doing these days.
TacoBello is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-18-2017, 03:04 PM   #18
Registered Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2017
Age: 63
Posts: 77
Thanked 49 Times in 23 Posts
That's funny. Initially most folks here panned the car's looks and went on and on about how ugly they thought the new grill was. I've not read one review yet that echoed those thoughts. After looking at the photos now for some time I've come to believe that the new grill makes the old beak look cheap. Looking forward to seeing the car in front of me.


Quote:
Originally Posted by jwong77 View Post
Wow I was a total hater when I first saw it, but I really like it now. The blue is fantastic!
Honda430 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-18-2017, 03:58 PM   #19
Senior Moderator
 
F23A4's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Age: 49
Posts: 16,100
Thanked 365 Times in 246 Posts
F23A4 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-18-2017, 04:06 PM   #20
45TFSI
 
kurtatx's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2013
Location: Austin, TX
Posts: 3,602
Thanked 660 Times in 463 Posts
Quote:
Originally Posted by Honda430 View Post
That's funny. Initially most folks here panned the car's looks and went on and on about how ugly they thought the new grill was. I've not read one review yet that echoed those thoughts. After looking at the photos now for some time I've come to believe that the new grill makes the old beak look cheap. Looking forward to seeing the car in front of me.
Some of the early photos (the teaser comes to mind) actually did make the car look odd.
kurtatx is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-18-2017, 06:54 PM   #21
Registered Member
 
Saintor's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2001
Location: MTL, Canada
Age: 50
Posts: 2,418
Thanked 89 Times in 74 Posts
Car & Driver has even good words for the ZF9 ... that was probably not retouched.

2018 Acura TLX First Drive | Review | Car and Driver

Quote:
Ratios are stacked tightly, making it fun to employ the wheel-mounted paddle shifters. Sport+ switches to manual mode with the first tug of a lever and holds it until the driver instructs otherwise; it also allows for double downshifts. In the less aggressive settings, the transmission returns to drive after a few moments of inactivity. Numerous algorithms run in the background, optimizing transmission operation to suppress upshifts during spirited cornering and to hold gears while climbing and descending steep grades. If it sounds like a lot of electronic tomfoolery that will only try to put a lid on the fun, we’re here to tell you that’s not the case.
Saintor is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-18-2017, 11:04 PM   #22
Registered Member
 
a35tl's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: North Carolina
Posts: 801
Thanked 224 Times in 141 Posts
This site lists a ton of the specs and describes in detail all of the features for the '18 TLX.

https://www.netcarshow.com/acura/2018-tlx/
a35tl is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to a35tl For This Useful Post:
kurtatx (05-19-2017), nore03 (05-19-2017)
Old 05-19-2017, 09:11 AM   #23
Registered Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2015
Posts: 219
Thanked 39 Times in 23 Posts
I read that length of car increased by 1.4 inch (1.2 in aspec). Did any of that go to rear leg room? I did not see leg room numbers anywhere.
alpha0 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-19-2017, 09:44 AM   #24
6 Forward 1 Back
 
Speed_Racer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2001
Location: Bay Area CA
Posts: 2,037
Thanked 127 Times in 58 Posts
Quote:
Originally Posted by alpha0 View Post
I read that length of car increased by 1.4 inch (1.2 in aspec). Did any of that go to rear leg room? I did not see leg room numbers anywhere.
There hasn't been any interior volume changes from what it looks like. The increase in length is the new front and rear bumpers I think.
Speed_Racer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-19-2017, 10:30 AM   #25
Registered Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Houston, TX
Posts: 781
Thanked 102 Times in 83 Posts
I like what I see!

Do you know if the ASpec package comes with adjustable suspension?
hadokenuh is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-19-2017, 10:47 AM   #26
Moderator
 
CheeseyPoofs McNut's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2014
Location: Northern Ohio
Posts: 1,422
Thanked 845 Times in 390 Posts
Quote:
Originally Posted by hadokenuh View Post
I like what I see!

Do you know if the ASpec package comes with adjustable suspension?
That's a negatory. I believe they tune it differently (a little tighter) but it's not something you can adjust with a button or knob in the cabin.
CheeseyPoofs McNut is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-19-2017, 12:41 PM   #27
Registered Member
 
atl7's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Location: St. Louis, MO
Posts: 345
Thanked 82 Times in 46 Posts
Does anyone know what colors the A-Spec is offered in? I know blue and white, but for other colors I can't seem to find that anywhere.
atl7 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-19-2017, 12:54 PM   #28
Registered Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Posts: 763
Thanked 134 Times in 96 Posts
Quote:
Originally Posted by atl7 View Post
Does anyone know what colors the A-Spec is offered in? I know blue and white, but for other colors I can't seem to find that anywhere.
Saw somewhere that aspec colors are limited to white, blue, black and gray. No silver which is a bummer
mondster is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-19-2017, 01:29 PM   #29
45TFSI
 
kurtatx's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2013
Location: Austin, TX
Posts: 3,602
Thanked 660 Times in 463 Posts
Quote:
Originally Posted by mondster View Post
Saw somewhere that aspec colors are limited to white, blue, black and gray. No silver which is a bummer
No athletic red, either? One of my favorite things about my TSX was the awesome red color.
kurtatx is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-19-2017, 01:50 PM   #30
You'll Never Walk Alone
iTrader: (1)
 
iforyou's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: Vancouver, BC, Canada
Age: 30
Posts: 8,654
Thanked 483 Times in 329 Posts
It really seems like Acura successfully fixed many of the original complaints. Better tranny, faster infotainement, easier to use dual screen setup, sportier styling, exhaust tips, nicer and larger wheels, fatter tires, and available sportier interior.
iforyou is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following 4 Users Say Thank You to iforyou For This Useful Post:
a35tl (05-19-2017), hadokenuh (05-19-2017), kurtatx (05-19-2017), wlkeel (05-19-2017)
Old 05-19-2017, 01:58 PM   #31
Registered Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Posts: 763
Thanked 134 Times in 96 Posts
Quote:
Originally Posted by kurtatx View Post
No athletic red, either? One of my favorite things about my TSX was the awesome red color.

Apparently, san marino red is also an aspec color choice. So 5 choices.... white, blue, red, black and gray
mondster is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-19-2017, 02:29 PM   #32
45TFSI
 
kurtatx's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2013
Location: Austin, TX
Posts: 3,602
Thanked 660 Times in 463 Posts
Quote:
Originally Posted by mondster View Post
Apparently, san marino red is also an aspec color choice. So 5 choices.... white, blue, red, black and gray
I think Milano red is what I had. That's a solid color. San Marino is pretty much the same
kurtatx is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-19-2017, 03:12 PM   #33
Registered Member
 
ZipSpeed's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2013
Location: Calgary, Canada
Posts: 67
Thanked 19 Times in 10 Posts
Quote:
Originally Posted by iforyou View Post
It really seems like Acura successfully fixed many of the original complaints. Better tranny, faster infotainement, easier to use dual screen setup, sportier styling, exhaust tips, nicer and larger wheels, fatter tires, and available sportier interior.
And the fact that they are listening, bodes well for the future. I can imagine the first paragraph in a business school textbook: "If you give what your customer is asking for, they'll give you money." Kinda sad it took Acura this long to figure it out.
ZipSpeed is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-19-2017, 03:19 PM   #34
6 Forward 1 Back
 
Speed_Racer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2001
Location: Bay Area CA
Posts: 2,037
Thanked 127 Times in 58 Posts
Speed_Racer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-19-2017, 03:33 PM   #35
45TFSI
 
kurtatx's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2013
Location: Austin, TX
Posts: 3,602
Thanked 660 Times in 463 Posts
The red
kurtatx is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-19-2017, 04:21 PM   #36
I love tacos
 
TacoBello's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2014
Location: In an igloo
Posts: 24,259
Thanked 3,439 Times in 2,580 Posts
Don't get too too excited about the blue TLX- I'm guessing it will be an upgrade color, judging by the asterisk beside it's name (same with the black copper).

I could be wrong, but that blue looks near identical to the blue on the NSX and it is a pricey option on that car. I imagine this will be the same- it looks crazy nice, but I wonder how many people will be willing to drop an additional 5k just on paint.
TacoBello is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-19-2017, 04:33 PM   #37
Registered Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2017
Age: 63
Posts: 77
Thanked 49 Times in 23 Posts
My my understanding is the blue comes at no additional expense. However, my suspicion is that demand will drive the price higher than for the other available colors.

Quote:
Originally Posted by TacoBello View Post
Don't get too too excited about the blue TLX- I'm guessing it will be an upgrade color, judging by the asterisk beside it's name (same with the black copper).

I could be wrong, but that blue looks near identical to the blue on the NSX and it is a pricey option on that car. I imagine this will be the same- it looks crazy nice, but I wonder how many people will be willing to drop an additional 5k just on paint.
Honda430 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-19-2017, 04:38 PM   #38
Registered Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2017
Age: 63
Posts: 77
Thanked 49 Times in 23 Posts
I'm kinda drawn to it also. I've never owned a red car, but I have to admit to liking the look of the red advance that's featured in the promo shots. It's a real tranquil color to me.


Quote:
Originally Posted by kurtatx View Post
The red
Honda430 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-19-2017, 04:53 PM   #39
6 Forward 1 Back
 
Speed_Racer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2001
Location: Bay Area CA
Posts: 2,037
Thanked 127 Times in 58 Posts
Quote:
Originally Posted by TacoBello View Post
Don't get too too excited about the blue TLX- I'm guessing it will be an upgrade color, judging by the asterisk beside it's name (same with the black copper).

I could be wrong, but that blue looks near identical to the blue on the NSX and it is a pricey option on that car. I imagine this will be the same- it looks crazy nice, but I wonder how many people will be willing to drop an additional 5k just on paint.
It's not extra. I cut off that diagram too much. Single asterisk for Black Copper is because it's only available on V6 models. Double asterisk is for Still Night Blue being only available on the A Spec. Still Night Blue is real similiar to the NSX, but is the exact same color as what's available on the Accord Coupes. NSX is Nouvelle Blue Pearl and looks brighter. As far as optional paint, I think the current NSX is the only Acura to charge extra for paint. I don't recall it being done on any other model.

Here's the Acura press article on the interior/exterior colors: 2018 Acura TLX Press Kit - Interior - Acura Automobiles - Honda News
Speed_Racer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-19-2017, 05:12 PM   #40
Randy is the Future
 
nore03's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Tampa, FL
Age: 32
Posts: 336
Thanked 38 Times in 20 Posts
I think it looks great, only down side is that people who want the features of the Advance model lose some goodies in the Aspec model. I was hoping they had a. aspec model based on the tech package then another based on the advance model.
nore03 is offline   Reply With Quote
 
 
Reply

Related Topics
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
E_Master's Anthracite Metallic TL Progress Thread E_Master 3G TL Photograph Gallery 40 08-13-2017 07:43 AM
Anyone have a TLX with A-Spec package? ImJustADishwasher Fifth Generation TLX (2015+) 24 03-16-2017 08:12 AM
RedlineGoods A-Spec Steering Wheel Cover guitarplayer16 3G TL Photograph Gallery 2 01-20-2017 03:16 PM
Trade in for a new lease NOW? ImJustADishwasher Car Talk 3 12-11-2016 10:26 AM
HEELTOE AUTOMOTIVE! I can't BELIEVE THEM! navicolb Car Talk 22 11-08-2016 12:43 AM


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 10:01 AM.


 
  • Ask a Question
    Get answers from community experts
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: