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Mitsubishi: Lancer News

 
Old 01-21-2007, 01:37 AM
  #361  
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Originally Posted by TL CHROMETIDE
I'm guessing that they're turn signals.
That's what the innermost bulb in the headlight looks like it is, why else would it be amber?
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Old 01-23-2007, 11:59 PM
  #362  
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First Drive: 2008 Mitsubishi Lancer
http://www.edmunds.com/insideline/do...hotopanel..1.*

Less raucous, more robust

By Karl Brauer ,Editor in Chief, Edmunds.com
Date posted: 01-23-2007

The all-new 2008 Mitsubishi Lancer makes you wonder what's happened to the market for economy cars. Whether you're tickling the magnesium shift paddles of the Lancer's continuously variable transmission (CVT) or twisting the meaty rim of the steering wheel or reveling in the composure of the chassis in the corners, it's clear the term "economy sedan" doesn't mean what it used to. The 2008 Mitsubishi Lancer is a robust and satisfying people mover that will further elevate buyer expectations in this ever-elevating segment.

Rebuilding the brand
The 2008 Mitsubishi Lancer arrives at a time when Mitsubishi is struggling to redefine itself. The Lancer is part of the company's overall effort to upgrade its reputation for quality and reestablish its credibility with mainstream American drivers.

The Lancer's all-new chassis is a stoutly engineered effort, derived from the Dodge Caliber and upgraded sufficiently to serve as the basis for the forthcoming all-wheel-drive Lancer Evolution X. In fact, this new Lancer's structure starts out stiffer than that of the current Evolution IX before any structural enhancements are added.

Compared to the previous-generation Lancer, the new car's wheelbase has been stretched 1.4 inches and the track has been widened 2.3 inches. Torsional rigidity has been increased an amazing 56 percent, while bending resistance has been improved 50 percent. Every detail of body structure, from the steering system's mounting points to basic structural design, was reviewed during development in an effort to maximize chassis integrity. For instance, the new Lancer repositioned the exhaust system to permit chassis cross members that are straight and strong.

Heavily updated
As might be expected, this increase in the strength of the Lancer's chassis adds to the car's curb weight. Depending on trim level, the new car is approximately 200 pounds heavier than the previous-generation Lancer.

Aside from the weight of a car that's physically larger than before (although actually a half inch shorter), there's also a system of no fewer than seven airbags: front-seat airbags, front-seat-mounted side airbags, curtain-type head protection airbags and the first standard driver's knee-protection airbag in this market segment.

Once you add the powerful four-wheel-disc brake system from the Outlander, as well as 18-inch wheels (both standard on top-line GTS models), it's easy to see where the 200 pounds comes from.

Some weight has actually been saved in the drivetrain, as the former iron-block 2.0-liter four-cylinder has been replaced by a 2.0-liter DOHC MIVEC four-cylinder that uses an aluminum block that represents a savings of 59.5 pounds. This engine puts out 152 horsepower (143 hp in PZEV form for California) and 146 pound-feet of torque. Variable valve timing for both the intake and exhaust camshafts helps broaden the power band.

No 2.4-liter engine has yet been officially announced for the Lancer, but we'd expect to see this power plant return to the Lancer lineup when the Ralliart version becomes available in the coming year. Meanwhile, the 2.0-liter mates to either a standard five-speed manual transmission or an optional CVT automatic. On top-trim GTS models the CVT includes a six-step "Sportronic" shift mode that's controlled via the titanium shift paddles mounted on the steering wheel.

Worth the weight
While added weight can hurt anyone, it actually gives the new Lancer a substantial, almost Teutonic sense of over-the-road confidence. The steering requires more effort than before, but it's not heavy and doesn't make the car feel cumbersome. This weightiness similarly describes the car's ride quality and chassis reactions, but in a good way. In particular, the Lancer GTS charges through corners with pronounced certainty, even when the pavement is bumpy and broken.

You can't quite fling the Lancer into corners as if it were a Mazda 3 or Honda Civic, but that's partially because the chassis is begging for more power. It's clear all the hard parts are properly bolted together and capable of much greater demands than this 2.0-liter four-cylinder can generate. We expect buyers who are unwilling to wait for the Lancer Ralliart with its 2.4-liter engine to go to the aftermarket for a turbocharging system, and we expect these more powerful Lancers will be a hoot to drive.

Flavors and options
Three trim levels of the Lancer will be offered when the car goes on sale in March. Entry-level DE models will come with 16-inch steel wheels, front disc brakes and a 140-watt AM/FM/CD audio system with MP3 capability. DE buyers can opt for antilock brakes with electronic brakeforce distribution as part of the A/C & Power Package, which also includes air-conditioning, power door locks and a one-touch driver's power window.

Midgrade Lancer ES models are upgraded to 16-inch cast-alloy wheels, plus four-wheel disc brakes and ABS, air-conditioning, a 60/40-folding rear seat, power door locks with keyless entry and Bluetooth cell phone connectivity.

Step up to the GTS trim and the most obvious enhancement comes in the form of 10-spoke, 18-inch alloy wheels wearing 215/45R18 tires. GTS Lancers also get a six-speaker audio system, automatic climate control, some aerodynamic bodywork trim, foglights, a rear spoiler, bucket seats and a sport-tuned suspension with a strut-tower brace.

Both ES and GTS customers can add the Sun & Sound Package to add both a power sunroof and a 650-watt Rockford Fosgate audio system with six-disc changer, auxiliary input and six months of prepaid Sirius Satellite Radio. A Navigation & Technology Package, offered only on GTS versions, gives the Lancer Lexus-like features that range from keyless start to a 30-gigabyte digital music server to a GPS navigation system, all accessed via a 7-inch LCD touchscreen.

We expect the new Lancer to accomplish two goals when it arrives in March. First, it will convince economy-sedan buyers that Mitsubishi is once again a serious player in this segment. Second, it will convince hard-core enthusiasts that all the hype surrounding the Lancer Evolution X is fully justified. These are critical steps on the road to recovery for Mitsubishi. Fortunately, the 2008 Mitsubishi Lancer appears to be robust enough to stand up to just this kind of pressure.
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Old 01-24-2007, 01:21 AM
  #363  
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that looks quite enjoyable. when are manual transmissions going to be replaced for good? i wonder...
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Old 04-26-2007, 09:04 AM
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2008 Mitsubishi Lancer Evolution X revealed

mmm...I like... Lots of nice pics and they stuck pretty close to the concept!

http://www.leftlanenews.com/mitsubis...olution-x.html
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Old 04-26-2007, 03:32 PM
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Did anyone else realise that in the picture of the back of the car the right tire is different than the left ?????
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Old 04-26-2007, 03:39 PM
  #366  
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I don't like those wheels.
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Old 04-26-2007, 04:26 PM
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Originally Posted by dom
I don't like those wheels.
yeah the wheels in those latest pics suck, concept ones were much better. but what else is new...
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Old 04-30-2007, 08:55 AM
  #368  
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Maybe i'm in the minority, but I absolutely love that thing. It looks so.... mean. My new 335 only has 3200 miles on it.. and it's already paid for.. hmmm.....
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Old 04-30-2007, 10:20 AM
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I think its the ugliest of all generations of Evos.
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Old 04-30-2007, 01:39 PM
  #370  
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Originally Posted by TL CHROMETIDE
I'm guessing that they're turn signals.
could they be fog lights
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Old 04-30-2007, 04:34 PM
  #371  
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My buddy, who has an Evo ix, says that this evo x will be made by dodge. Can anyone confirm?
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Old 04-30-2007, 05:13 PM
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Originally Posted by TheAcAvenger
Maybe i'm in the minority, but I absolutely love that thing. It looks so.... mean. My new 335 only has 3200 miles on it.. and it's already paid for.. hmmm.....
I happen to really like the new design too....maybe something else to put on my list to consider...
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Old 04-30-2007, 06:23 PM
  #373  
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Originally Posted by TL CHROMETIDE
My buddy, who has an Evo ix, says that this evo x will be made by dodge. Can anyone confirm?
I don't think he meant MADE by dodge, but I do vaguely recall reading something about some cross-platform unholiness going on. Don't take my word for it though.
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Old 05-01-2007, 12:26 AM
  #374  
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I think it looks way better than the new WRX's
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Old 05-01-2007, 10:50 AM
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Mitsubishi Makes Lancer Evolution X Official in Japan
http://www.edmunds.com/insideline/do...ticleId=115886

Mitsubishi Makes Lancer Evolution X Official in Japan
Date posted: 04-26-2007

TOKYO — Mitsubishi announced today that its high-performance four-wheel-drive sedan will officially be called the 2008 Lancer Evolution X (pronounced "ten") in Japan and Lancer Evolution in the U.S. The announcement follows months of speculation about the name of the 10th generation Evo as enthusiasts wondered whether the sedan would be named Evo X (pronounced "X") after the Prototype X concept car, which debuted earlier this year at the 2007 Detroit Auto Show, or continue the numbered sequence from its predecessor the Evo IX.

Although the Evolution X name will be used in Japan, each region's marketing team gets a say, and the U.S. group is sticking with the simple Lancer Evolution moniker, claiming that's always been its official name here, and the Roman numeral system was only used by enthusiasts and media.

No matter the name, the photo released today depicts the global 2008 Lancer Evolution that will go into production late this year, and battle an all-new 2008 Subaru WRX for street supremacy. Inside Line has already captured track footage of the 2008 Evo testing several times in California.

The 2008 Lancer Evo was expected to make its debut at the Frankfurt Motor Show in September, but Mitsubishi said this week that the unveiling has been pushed back to the Toyko Motor Show in October. Expect to see more Evo info and photos trickle into the media during the next several months as the competitive auto show season heats up.

The all-new 2008 Evo features Mitsubishi's Super All-Wheel Control traction and handling system, a new lightweight and high-performance 2.0-liter turbocharged MIVEC engine with aluminum cylinder block and a six-speed manual transmission.

What this means to you: No matter the official name, the all-new Lancer Evolution is expected to be the best-handling Evolution ever, and enthusiasts will still call it the Evo X.
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Old 05-02-2007, 11:45 PM
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Full Test: 2008 Mitsubishi Lancer GTS
http://www.edmunds.com/insideline/do...hotopanel..3.*

Lots of trick features, but no horses

By Chris Walton, Chief Road Test Editor
Date posted: 05-01-2007

The new Mitsubishi Evo is on the way, and everyone who has seen the Concept-X showcar knows it. The ongoing Evo buzz has made us pretty eager to get into the new 2008 Mitsubishi Lancer GTS.

With our first drive of the Lancer GTS, we already found out that this is a radically different Lancer than ever before. For one thing, it's got a CVT (continuously variable transmission), technology that we're seeing on a growing number of cars in this segment.

It shows us that cars in this class are trying to deliver performance, not just gas-sipping value.

Say Goodbye to Cheap and Cheerful
The 2008 Lancer does a good job of making you forget the strange, oddly proportioned little cars that have worn the nameplate for the last couple of decades. It's been stretched in every dimension, with a 1.4-inch-longer wheelbase, another 2.3 inches in width and 4.0 inches of height, and it adds up to 94.8 cubic feet of passenger volume.

This platform doesn't have a very sexy heritage, as it was developed by DaimlerChrysler to furnish a building block for a lot of different vehicles, from the Dodge Caliber to the Mitsubishi Outlander. But it brings 56 percent more torsional rigidity than before, as well as 50 percent more bending rigidity, and this gives the Lancer GTS a substantial, almost German feeling of substance.

The Lancer GTS features special bodywork, foglights, sport seats, a front strut-tower brace and an aggressive suspension calibration with 215/45R18 tires. It's a Lancer made for guys who care about driving.

Same-Day Acceleration
The only thing that hasn't grown larger is the Lancer's engine. The former iron-block 2.0-liter 4G63 inline-4 has given way to an aluminum-block 2.0-liter 4B11. The new 2.0-liter inline-4 produces 152 horsepower, a lot of power from so little displacement. And thanks to Mitsubishi's variable valve timing for both the intake and exhaust cams, there's a broad torque curve that starts at about 2,000 rpm with 135 pound-feet and then plateaus a short time later with 146 lb-ft at 4,250 rpm.

But pulling around as much as 400 pounds extra compared to the former Lancer pretty well erases the engine's output advantage. While we weren't expecting trails of fire from the all-new 2.0-liter inline-4, we were hoping for better than the 9.0 seconds it takes to reach 60 mph, only a tenth or so quicker than the 120-hp 2006 Lancer managed.

In comparison, the $21,290, 197-hp Honda Civic Si sedan with its five-speed manual transmission reaches 60 mph in just 7.1 seconds. The $19,400, 177-hp Nissan Sentra SE-R Spec V does the job in 6.7 seconds.

Meanwhile, the Lancer GTS will get smoked by almost any 2-ton V6 crossover and even a few minivans. And the droning engine note sounds more janitorial than sporty.

Continuously Vexing Transmission (CVT)
We partly blame this GTS's sluggish performance on its CVT transmission. While a five-speed manual continues to be available (and we recommend it for this car), the traditional four-speed automatic has been replaced with the CVT. It allows you to shift among six ratios with steering-wheel-mounted paddles. Mitsubishi says the CVT offers a wider range of ratios than the outgoing four-speed automatic, thus increasing both performance and economy.

Instead of varying engine speed and shifting gears to suit, the CVT can maintain a predetermined engine speed and continuously vary the transmission ratios for the desired vehicle speed. And the combination of the 152-hp four-cylinder and CVT does outperform the 120-hp four-cylinder with four-speed automatic with both quicker acceleration and better fuel economy.

Driving a car is an even more variable endeavor than either of these two continuously variably optimized situations, however, and the GTS's CVT has a hard time figuring out which one you want. Even with what Mitsubishi calls Intelligent and Innovative Vehicle Electronic Control System (INVECS III), a program that learns the driver's behavior pattern over time, too little power always arrives too late.

In due course, we noted the system responded more quickly if we downshifted when we wanted more speed, and so we did — all the time. Since we noticed the engine reached redline quicker in Manual mode (at 45 mph instead of 75 mph in "Drive"), we left it there until the top of 1st gear, then switched over to Drive to complete the rest of the quarter-mile, cutting a second from our time in Drive-only mode.

The CVT gives you a kind of elasticity in performance like a conventional automatic transmission, and it's more responsive and more fuel-efficient. But you wouldn't exactly call it responsive compared to a manual transmission, and you have to continuously keep tugging at the shift paddles to achieve any speed. And that kind of diminishes the whole point of a CVT, doesn't it?

Got Its Feet on the Ground
The GTS's handling is above average for its class, especially considering its base price of $18,490. It has just about a perfect compromise between performance handling and daily ride comfort.

Although the new engine sits farther forward in the chassis than before, our only dynamic demerit arose because the ordinary all-season tires heated up and gave up long before the rest of the package did. The rock-solid chassis is very good at isolating the passengers from the outside, even with the standard 215/45R18 tires.

Before the front tires relinquished grip during skid-pad testing, we recorded an admirable average lateral acceleration of 0.86g (plus 0.89g in one direction). The rear tires wilted first in our slalom, yet we were pleased with the Lancer's thoroughly entertaining performance of 65.5 mph.

We'd prefer a bit more communication through the steering wheel, though.

The GTS's four-wheel disc brakes apparently come right from the 3,800-pound Outlander SUV, so stopping the 3,100-pound Lancer unsurprisingly proves to be a fade-free experience that inspires confidence, and it comes to a halt in 118 feet from 60 mph, just shy of a rating of "Excellent."

Going Upmarket With Smart Styling
On the outside, the Lancer has a genuine international flavor, and we find hints of Acura, Audi, Volvo and even a little Alfa Romeo in the rear view. It has a look that sets it apart from the omnipresent Honda Civic, stodgy new Nissan Sentra and uninspired Toyota Corolla.

The 2008 Lancer also goes upmarket with a selection of standard features once regarded as luxury items. For the added cost of a typical power moonroof, our test car came equipped with the $1,500 P2 Sun and Sound package, which includes a high-end 650-watt Rockford Fosgate sound system (see Stereo Evaluation), Sirius Satellite Radio (free for the first six months), six-CD/MP3 in-dash head unit, an aux-input jack, plus the moonroof.

An additional $2,000 for the P3 Navigation and Technology package nets the 30-gigabyte hard-drive-based navi system, which also provides for digital audio uploading to the music server (it's totally useful), a 7-inch touchscreen, and a wide array of trip-related functions.

The Promise of Power To Come
At a grand total of just $22,615, our loaded-up Lancer GTS presents somewhat of a dilemma. Once regarded as a marginalized, low-cost, second- or third-choice cheap-and-cheerful compact, the Lancer now measures up to first-class status in many ways.

Now if Mitsubishi would just ladle a generous portion of motivational tempo on top of its nimble GTS chassis, it would really have something. Fortunately we've learned that's exactly the plan.

Within a year, there will be three more Lancer variants. First there will be a front-wheel-drive model with a 2.4-liter inline-4 dubbed either Lancer GST or Lancer Ralliart. Then there will be the all-wheel-drive Evolution X (perhaps with as much as 320 hp). And finally something between the two that will be positioned against the 2008 Subaru Impreza WRX, which we believe will be an all-wheel-drive Lancer GSX with an inline-4 boosted to 250 hp with a light-pressure turbo.

Once this horseless carriage gets some motivation, the Lancer should be our kind of car.
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Old 05-02-2007, 11:59 PM
  #377  
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The rumored 250hp GSX version of the Lancer that's supposed to compete with the WRX sounds very interesting. If Mitsu offers the Twin Clutch transmission that's touted to be better than DSG on the GSX then it'll be extremely tempting for me!


just read that R&T article post-
"A standard 5-speed manual gearbox and a new 6-speed twin-clutch automatic with manual mode, codenamed SST, will be offered. The latter is similar to Volkswagen's DSG, meaning that it's essentially a manual transmission that has a seamless full automatic mode. In manual mode, up- and downshifts are performed sequentially via paddles behind the steering wheel, with each gear change performed faster than any human hand. An anonymous source inside the company claims that this new transmission will be better than VW's."
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Old 07-11-2007, 01:02 PM
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http://www.autoweek.com/apps/pbcs.dl...0001/1530/FREE

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Mitsubishi releases details on Evo X transmission and stability-control system


AutoWeek | Published 07/10/07, 9:41 am et
Mitsubishi isn’t ready to drop all the details on the Evo X just yet, but we now have some official info on one of the transmission choices and the vehicle dynamics system.

The DSG-style transmission is called Twin Clutch SST and features three distinct modes to suit the driver’s mood. Normal mode is intended to optimize shift points for lazy motoring and improved fuel economy; we don’t expect to use this one much. Sport mode is the next step up and pushes shift points higher as well as allowing for engine braking. S-Sport mode keeps the engine revving higher and allows even faster shifts for high-strung fun.

Super All Wheel Control is the name for Mitsubishi’s fancy traction-control system. The active center differential is the first step in the torque splitting process, done via a multi-plate hydraulic clutch. Active yaw control is the next step and basically works like a limited-slip differential, but it now has the power to brake an individual wheel to provide more control. Active stability control steps in to control braking through sensors that detect brake pressure at each wheel. A sport ABS system tops off the S-AWC package and promises to keep your wheels from locking up.

All the above systems combine with a synergistic effect from sharing sensors and computer processors to keep your Evo X from sliding off the road. Expect to find different modes for pavement, snow and gravel with each optimized to its specific surface.

We’ll have to wait until the Tokyo motor show to find out exactly how much power these systems will be charged with harnessing.
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Old 07-12-2007, 12:38 AM
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here are some new pictures!











HOT
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Old 07-12-2007, 08:11 AM
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Ah, gotta love that high speed cruising on the Autobahn.
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Old 07-12-2007, 09:39 AM
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Originally Posted by AutoGirl
I happen to really like the new design too....maybe something else to put on my list to consider...
exactly. i've been thinking the same thing. I saw a Lancer GTS in person the other day.
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Old 07-20-2007, 08:39 PM
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Evo X dyno chart!



http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lKuV3HLtX10

this is the video in japanese introducing evo x!

206 KW == 276.25055

422 N.m == 311.25123 foot pounds

We don't know if it is WHP.
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Old 07-20-2007, 10:17 PM
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blech, re-veil it please.
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Old 07-24-2007, 12:00 PM
  #384  
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I love the car, cant wait for it to go on sale. Hopefully the dealers wont be dicks about test drives.
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Old 07-25-2007, 10:03 AM
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Any word on the development of the trim level rumored to slot in below the Evo X but above the GTS model?
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Old 07-25-2007, 12:16 PM
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shweet
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Old 07-29-2007, 03:42 PM
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Originally Posted by F23A4
Any word on the development of the trim level rumored to slot in below the Evo X but above the GTS model?
Infact. yup! got some pictures for ya!







http://jalopnik.com/cars/spy-photos/...art-283582.php

^^^ other photos!
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Old 08-16-2007, 08:24 AM
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Spy Video: 2009 Mitsubishi Lancer Ralliart

Our latest spy video reveals what appears to be the often talked about, but never seen 2009 Mitsubishi Lancer Ralliart. Forget what you might remember about the previous Lancer Ralliart, as this new version will offer more than just a revised suspension and a modest horsepower increase.

Prototypes spotted in the mountains of Colorado and the deserts of Death Valley reveal only modest changes to the Ralliart's styling. Slightly more aggressive bodywork, larger wheels and tires, and dual exhaust pipes are the most obvious changes.

Under the hood, we expect the 2009 Mitsubishi Lancer Ralliart will get a turbocharged version of Mitsubishi's latest 2.0-liter four-cylinder with an output of around 220 to 230 horsepower. The proximity to the 224 hp generated by the Subaru Impreza WRX is no coincidence, as Mitsubishi is directly targeting Subaru's highly successful midlevel performance.

The dual-clutch gearbox being introduced by Mitsubishi for the Lancer Evolution isn't likely to find its way into the Ralliart, however, so expect to see either a five- or six-speed manual gearbox.

Further evidence of Mitsubishi's aim to unseat the WRX is the Ralliart's use of all-wheel drive. Yes, unlike previous Ralliart models that were saddled with only front-wheel drive, this Ralliart will send power to all four of its wheels. Expect a slightly less advanced version of the Lancer Evolution's AWD system in order to keep costs down.

With the debut of the Lancer Evolution scheduled for October, the official unveil of the Ralliart model shouldn't be far behind.

Edmunds
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Old 08-16-2007, 08:37 AM
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i cant wait to read test drive reviews of the X version
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Old 08-21-2007, 11:37 PM
  #390  
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Post 2009 Mitsubishi Lancer Ralliart...

This is not your old Ralliart...it's Mitsubishi's attempt to take on the Subaru WRX.




From Edmunds...

Our latest spy video reveals what appears to be the often talked about, but never seen 2009 Mitsubishi Lancer Ralliart. Forget what you might remember about the previous Lancer Ralliart, as this new version will offer more than just a revised suspension and a modest horsepower increase.

Prototypes spotted in the mountains of Colorado and the deserts of Death Valley reveal only modest changes to the Ralliart's styling. Slightly more aggressive bodywork, larger wheels and tires, and dual exhaust pipes are the most obvious changes.

Under the hood, we expect the 2009 Mitsubishi Lancer Ralliart will get a turbocharged version of Mitsubishi's latest 2.0-liter four-cylinder with an output of around 220 to 230 horsepower. The proximity to the 224 hp generated by the Subaru Impreza WRX is no coincidence, as Mitsubishi is directly targeting Subaru's highly successful midlevel performance.

The dual-clutch gearbox being introduced by Mitsubishi for the Lancer Evolution isn't likely to find its way into the Ralliart, however, so expect to see either a five- or six-speed manual gearbox.

Further evidence of Mitsubishi's aim to unseat the WRX is the Ralliart's use of all-wheel drive. Yes, unlike previous Ralliart models that were saddled with only front-wheel drive, this Ralliart will send power to all four of its wheels. Expect a slightly less advanced version of the Lancer Evolution's AWD system in order to keep costs down.

With the debut of the Lancer Evolution scheduled for October, the official unveil of the Ralliart model shouldn't be far behind.
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Old 08-21-2007, 11:43 PM
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Old 09-25-2007, 02:04 PM
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First Drive: 2008 Mitsubishi Lancer Evolution



Growing Up Means Difficult Choices

By Jason Kavanagh, Engineering Editor
Date posted: 09-24-2007


Years ago, interactive media took the form of a series of books known as "Choose Your Own Adventure." Key plot decisions were foisted upon the reader to determine the lead character's fate, and a single choice could determine whether he became the ruler of a new planet or was eaten by trolls.

Mitsubishi has faced a similarly grim situation in creating the 2008 Lancer Evolution. Known as the Evolution X elsewhere in the world, this all-wheel-drive, turbocharged sedan has arrived at a crossroads. It could continue as a rally-style homologation special with an edgy, hard-core persona. Or it could evolve into a car with a broader appeal for increased sales volume.

Evo? Broadened appeal? To this owner of a 2004 Lancer Evolution, the choices are like oil and water. Ruler of the planet, or eaten by trolls?

Based on the Lancer
We would find out which adventure Mitsubishi has chosen at the company's winter proving grounds in Tokachi, Japan, where we were among the first group of people outside of the factory to drive the 2008 Mitsubishi Lancer Evolution.

The Evo X has grown up, both literally and figuratively. Built on the new chassis introduced for the Lancer for 2008, the wheelbase has stretched exactly 1 inch while the track is up by 1.2 inches. More important, the new Evo is 1.2 inches taller and 1.6 inches wider.

Unlike in years past, the U.S.-bound Evo X will not differ substantially from those sold in other countries.

Two trim levels will comprise the initial offerings for America. The GSR is the base model, and it's equipped with an all-new, stronger five-speed manual transmission and cast-aluminum 8.5-by-18-inch Enkei wheels. The more expensive MR model gets more acoustic insulation, HID headlights, Bilstein dampers and the long-awaited twin-clutch transmission. The MR also features a useful reduction in unsprung weight, as two-piece Brembo brake rotors are each lighter by 2.9 pounds while the spidery forged-aluminum BBS wheels shave 2 pounds from each corner.

We expect prices to rise about $2,000 relative to base and MR versions of the 2006 Mitsubishi Evo IX.

Restrained Aggression
The Evo's street-fighter look is gone, exchanged for a more mature kind of aggression evidenced by a tough, muscular new nose that looks like an Audi A4 that's spent some time working out on a Bowflex. The new Evo's rear wing is not nearly as prominent as before, and the fender flares are subtle.

Once you're inside the cabin, you sense that the higher beltline provides a more intimate cockpit vibe than the Evo IX, so you no longer have the sensation of being perched atop a stack of phone books. Recaro seats cradle your backside and the interior has a richer appearance that's a clear step up from the outgoing model's flimsy coach-class accommodations.

A Stiffer Structure Casts a Larger Shadow
Just when we thought the Evo chassis couldn't be stiffer, the new Evo X platform bests the rigidity of the outgoing model by 39 percent in torsion and an astounding 64 percent in bending.

Unfortunately, the penalty for such stoutness in combination with larger physical dimensions is weight. Although Mitsubishi hasn't yet released the curb weight of U.S.-spec Evo models, we expect the increase will be at least 100 pounds.

All-New Twin-Clutch Transmission
The MR model is equipped exclusively with a brilliant new six-speed dual-clutch transmission that Mitsubishi's clumsy acronym-speak identifies as Twin Clutch-Sequential Sportshift Transmission (TC-SST). Although conceptually similar to VW-Audi's twin-clutch unit, Mitsubishi has underwritten the development of TC-SST with a different supplier.

Three shift modes can be selected: Normal, Sport and S-Sport. Normal mode delivers early upshifts for best fuel economy. Sport holds gears longer and delivers quicker shifts, while S-Sport holds gears even longer and downshifts more aggressively, banging off gearchanges with real vigor.

You can command a shift manually via paddles mounted on the steering column or a lever on the center console. In full automatic mode, Normal mode slurs gears with the smoothness of the best automatics, while S-Sport executes gearchanges with authority and uncanny timing, as though wired into the driver's frontal lobe.

All-Aluminum Engine
Evo freaks worldwide have bemoaned the death of the venerable iron-block 4G63 power plant that has graced every Evo since the model debuted in 1992. As terrifically strong as this engine is, the pressures of emissions compliance and fuel-efficiency dictated the creation of the Evo X's all-new aluminum-block 1,998cc 4B11 engine.

The intercooled, turbocharged 4B11 inline-4 shares its basic architecture with the normally aspirated engine found in the 2008 Lancer, but it has been extensively reengineered for boosted use in the Evo. Unique pieces include a semi-closed deck block, a forged crank with an 86mm stroke and forged connecting rods.

Compared to the former Evo, the 4B11's aluminum block contributes to a 28-pound weight reduction for the new Evo's engine package and also helps lower the car's center of gravity by 10mm (0.4 inch). Full-floating wrist pins result in less internal friction, and the bottom end is underpinned with an aluminum ladder frame supporting four-bolt main bearing caps. The compression ratio rises slightly to 9.0:1 and MIVEC variable valve timing has been fitted to both cams, which are now chain-driven.

Output of the U.S.-specification 4B11 is estimated at 295 horsepower at 6,500 rpm and 300 pound-feet of torque at 4,000 rpm, though these numbers might change as final calibration is currently under way.

The new engine is a mighty smooth piece, building boost cleanly and linearly even from low engine speeds and exhibiting a willingness to spend all day around its fuel cutoff at 7,600 rpm. What's more, the drivetrain lash endemic to the Evo IX during rapid on-off throttle transitions has been banished from the new car.

All-Knowing All-Wheel Drive
All Evo Xs worldwide receive Super All-Wheel Control (S-AWC), which integrates control over the familiar active center differential (ACD) with the rear differential's active yaw control (AYC). This is AYC's first appearance on a U.S.-specification Evo. New additions to S-AWC include a brake control function and a yaw-rate sensor. The front differential remains a conventional helical limited-slip type.

We could spend pages attempting to explain how it all works and still get it wrong. The upshot is that S-AWC actively vectors wheel torque during acceleration and braking in order to influence the car's cornering attitude, even during sub-limit driving maneuvers. The result is more agility with more grip and traction, those qualities that make rally-derived cars different from lesser four-wheel platforms.

Active stability control (ASC) is the new Mitsubishi electronic safety net, and it can be fully switched off for track usage.

Is It Any Good?
Although the cars we drove were Japanese-specification (right-hand-drive) development cars, the car's driving character is established.

When you're driving into a fast corner with some real commitment, S-AWC makes the Evo X eerily effective. Just when you think it's time to apply some opposite lock to correct a slide, S-AWC has already seamlessly rerouted torque to the appropriate wheels. The car simply sorts itself out, rendering the countersteer actions you had anticipated largely unnecessary. By reducing the amount of sawing at the wheel you need to maintain the desired line in a corner, the car makes even an ordinary driver look like a hero.

It's still possible to spin the Evo X when ASC is switched off, but you can really fling this car around and it remains more neutral and composed than the Evo IX. Bump compliance has improved, further enhancing the car's cool self-assurance; you sense that it can rocket down practically any road with ease.

Still, the additional power in the new model is offset by its added pork, so expect straight-line acceleration contests between the 2008 Mitsubishi Evo X and the outgoing model to be a dead heat at best.

Throw in a few turns, though, and the situation changes. Mitsubishi engineers report that they can lap the Evo X 2 seconds faster around their 2.4-km (1.5-mile) course than a U.S.-spec Evo IX. We believe it. The newfound chassis prowess results in cornering speeds that are simply faster in the Evo X.

Speed is one thing, but once we drove the Evo IX that Mitsubishi had on hand for driving comparisons, it was clear that the outgoing car is the livelier ride. The Evo X is quicker point to point by virtue of its chassis magic, while the outgoing Evo IX requires more from the driver to go fast. You can guess which one proved more rewarding to the guy behind the wheel.

Wisely Chosen
Clearly, the adventure chosen for the 2008 Mitsubishi Lancer Evolution is "potential." Although it has lost some of the sharpness that has defined previous iterations, the 2008 Lancer Evolution's combination of dexterity, comfort and style will undoubtedly bring more buyers into the Evo fold.

And proponents of hard-core Evos haven't been forgotten. A gleam in the eyes of the Mitsubishi engineers hints that a few keystrokes in the computer mapping of S-AWC can dramatically alter the car's personality. Couple this magic with weight reduction and some goodies from the lab, and the makings are in place for a Mitsubishi Evo RS model that might take us on a completely different adventure.
http://www.edmunds.com/insideline/do...hotopanel..2.*
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Old 09-25-2007, 05:04 PM
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So no 6-speed in the MR, a shame if true.
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Old 09-25-2007, 06:00 PM
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I like this car!
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Old 09-25-2007, 06:48 PM
  #395  
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I am falling in love with this car. I am a huge fan of twin-clutch. You can already tell that this one will be better than the current VW DSG because it can handle the extra power out of the factory. Man, this will be one fast fricken ride. I can't wait for the Top Gear episode.

I have always been loyal to Subaru and the Impreza, but this thing just blows the new one out of the water. Subaru are idiots for ruining the Impreza.
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Old 09-25-2007, 11:15 PM
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2008 Mitsubishi Lancer Evolution XList price
est $35,000
Curb weight
3345 lb
Wheelbase
104.3 in.
Track, f/r
60.8 in./60.8 in.
Length
177.0 in
Width
71.3 in.
Height
58.3 in.
DrivetrainEngine
turbocharged dohc inline-4
Displacement
1998 cc
Horsepower
295 bhp @ 6500 rpm
Torque
300 lb-ft @ 4400 rpm
Redline
7000 rpm
Transmission
5-speed manual
ChassisLayout
front-engine/awd
Brakes system, f/r
13.8-in. vented discs/13.0-in. vented discs
Wheels
18 in. cast alloy
Tires
Yokohama Advan, P245/40R-18
Acceleration0–60 mph
5.2 sec
0–100 mph
13.8 sec
0–1320 ft
13.8 @ 100.0 mph
Braking60–0 mph
117 ft
80–0 mph
196 ft
HandlingSkidpad
0.96g
Slalom
67.2 mph
2008 Mitsubishi Lancer Evolution X

Hokkaido, Japan — He's the last guy you would imagine being the chief engineer of the Lancer Evolution. The first time you meet Hiroshi Fujii, you could easily mistake him for an accountant or a video-game programmer, but this soft-spoken gentleman has been the creative force behind the ridiculously fast and flashy Lancer Evolution for the past several years. Known among Evo enthusiasts as Mr. Evo, he presented us with a new version of his "baby," one that he said will redefine the brand and broaden its appeal.

To readers of Road & Track, the latest Evolution, dubbed Evo X (ten), hardly needs introduction. We featured it on the cover of our June issue, and although at the time the story was based on early inside information, it was correct about everything regarding the new Mitsubishi, including its styling and drivetrain. On a warm summer day in Hokkaido, we were formally introduced to the 2008 Lancer Evolution, and given an opportunity to put the car through its paces on a variety of different venues at Mitsubishi's proving grounds near the city of Tokachi.

All you need to do is look at the Evo X to realize that it's a different animal from its predecessor. It's noticeably bulkier than the last model, and although overall length remains about the same, every other dimension has grown significantly. Width and height are 71.3 and 58.3 in., respectively, and wheelbase is 104.3 in., an inch longer than the IX.

But the new Evo still retains its "bad-boy racer" spirit, thanks to its aggressive overall styling. Based on the Lancer sedan, the Evo X has the face of a bull shark getting ready to bite its prey. A massive grille reminiscent of the Audi S4 dominates the front end, while large canted headlights provide a nasty glare. The rear is highlighted by a flashy wing and subtle underbody diffuser, both functional, providing asphalt-sticking downforce at high speed. Vents on the hood suggest something wonderfully wicked resides underneath.

As we predicted five months ago, the latest Evo is powered by a turbocharged version of Mitsubishi's new-generation 2.0-liter inline-4, known in-house as the 4B11. While displacement remains unchanged from the 4G63 (in the Evo IX), this new aluminum-block powerplant is vastly improved. For one, it's lighter by about 27 lb., thanks to its aluminum construction. It also features Mitsubishi's variable-valve control technology (MIVEC) on both the intake and exhaust — the 4G63 had it on the intake side only.

It comes mated to either a 5-speed manual or the TC-SST, a new twin-clutch 6-speed semiautomatic transmission (more on this later). The overall result is slightly more power and torque than its predecessor with better or equal fuel economy. The turbocharged 4B11 produces 295 bhp at 6500 rpm and 300 lb.-ft. of torque at 4400.

Sounds like a winner, right? Yes, but with an asterisk.

That this engine is superior to the one it replaces is irrefutable(MYEVOVIII EDIT NOT). However, because the new Evo is about 300 lb. heavier than the outgoing model, it's a step or two slower getting to 60 mph and the quarter mile (we chose the 5-speed manual to perform our acceleration tests after Fujii informed us that the TC-SST's launch character was still not finalized). Rev the engine to 5500 rpm (limited by the launch-control mechanism), and drop the clutch. The four tires chirp and send the 3345-lb. beast on its way.

The Evo X gains momentum smoothly, almost too smoothly for hard-core forced-induction fans. Absent is the turbocharger surge that comes on at the 5000- to 6000-rpm mark. In fact, the 4G63 feels and sounds like a naturally aspirated 6-cylinder. Although the new car doesn't quite match the Evo IX's prowess in a straight line, it's quick nonetheless. It reached 60 mph in 5.2 seconds and dashed through the quarter in 13.8 sec.

How will the Evo faithfuls react when they find out that their new hero is slower than the previous model? It could get ugly, but let's hope they take into consideration the rationale behind the car's weight gain. Yes, the new Evo is physically larger — with more interior space for occupants — but the main reason is the application of new technology that makes the car a much more nimble machine.
U.S.-spec models will finally get AYC (Active Yaw Control). Previously reserved for Japan-spec models only, this new technology makes the Evo X one of the best-handling sports sedans in the world. AYC controls torque distribution of the rear wheels via a yaw-rate sensor to enhance cornering performance on all types of driving surfaces; it drastically reduces under- and oversteer.
Also in the mix is S-AWC (Super-All Wheel Control) that combines all of the car's electronic sensors to maximize safety during hazardous driving conditions. S-AWC utilizes the car's ACD (Active Center Differential), AYC, ASC (Active Stability Control) and ABS (Active Braking System) to regulate torque and braking force for all four wheels.

Combine this new technology with the Evo's taut suspension system (which is largely unchanged from the last model and includes Bilstein dampers for MR models) and rigid body (39-percent increase in beam stiffness and 64-percent increased torsional stiffness), and you have one of the most agile machines in the marketplace. With ASC turned off and AYC on, the new Evo registered an impressive 0.96g around the skidpad and ran through the slalom at a brisk 67.2 mph, a step slower than the Evo IX partially due to a slower steering ratio.

As impressive as the S-AWC is, perhaps the most noteworthy item on the new Evo is the TC-SST (Twin Clutch-Sportronic Shift Transmission). Like the DSG gearbox found in Audi/Volkswagen cars, the TC-SST is a manual-based transmission that provides a fully automatic mode and super-fast manual shifting via paddles behind the steering wheel.


The TC-SST has three different "full automatic" settings for various driving conditions: Normal, Sport and S-Sport. Normal is ideal for cruising, while Sport is meant for spirited driving on a twisty road...S-Sport is intended for an all-out attack on a track and is much more aggressive than the sportiest DSG mode. At this setting the gearbox won't upshift unless the tach needle is pegged at redline, and it downshifts as soon as you slow for a corner.

Around the 2.0-mile road circuit, the TC-SST worked flawlessly in both manual and full automatic modes. The only problem was it had trouble putting power down off the line, but Fujii assured me that this would be fixed before the car hits U.S. soil in January.

Also present at the track was a U.S.-spec 5-speed manual Evo IX, which I took for a few hot laps for comparison. "The Evo X is a nicer car," I told Fujii, "but the Evo IX is edgier and quicker."

Fujii responded barely above a whisper: "The Evo IX just seems quicker. I'm positive that the Evo X is faster around the track. The AYC gives it that edge, and you lose nothing with the TC-SST in S-Sport, even in full auto mode."

No way. This time, I had someone clock me. First up was the Evo IX. The car took off like a bullet, and it exhibited amazing balance through the sweepers and esses. The IX clocked in at 1 minute 55.20 sec. Now it was time for the Evo X in full auto mode. The TC-SST was fantastic, shifting exactly where I would have if I were in control. Also, I realized I was doing much less steering through most of the corners because the car wasn't getting out of shape. I went through the esses without any steering correction, virtually flat-out. I crossed the finish line in 1:54.18, more than a second faster than the IX!

This was enough to convince me that the Evo X, despite being a bit softer around the edges, is a superior car. Period. Mr. Evo smiled. Although he speaks in a whisper, I realized that he lets his car do the talking, and it talks mighty loud indeed.
http://www.roadandtrack.com/article....&page_number=1
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Old 09-25-2007, 11:16 PM
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The all-new 2008 Evo X is finally here. Well, almost. You’ll have to wait a few more months for it to hit dealers. But we recently got a sneak peek and first drive of the revamped speed demon at Mitsubishi’s Tokachi proving ground in Northern Japan, and it definitely lives up to the hype.

Mitsubishi took a big chance rebuilding this very popular sports sedan, as any serious modifications could cause the vehicle’s core customer—the fast and the furious—to get their speed fix elsewhere. No worries, though; the X (“X” stands for 10th generation) definitely embraces its racing roots. It’s sporty, fast and agile. Even so, this definitely isn’t the same adolescent bad boy that many have come to know and love. The X is more refined, more sophisticated—inside and out.

The most notable change is the all-new 2.0-liter intercooled and turbocharged inline Four that replaces the legendary 4G63 engine that served every previous Evo. It’s rated to produce 295 hp (up from 286 ponies) and 300 lb.-ft of torque (up from 289), but many experts believe those numbers are very conservative. To reduce weight, the engine is based on a reinforced aluminum block and is equipped with a direct-acting valvetrain that replaces the roller rocker arm configuration. On the asphalt, the switch translated into quicker throttle response and strong pull, no matter the gear.

You’ll have choice of two gearboxes to mate with the new four-banger: a five-speed manual and new six-speed Twin-Clutch Sportronic Shift Transmission (TC-SST). The latter is an electrohydraulic manual transmission that’s not unlike VW’s DSG. It can select two gears at once—one engaged, the other all spooled up and ready to go. When the gears are changed, there is no lag time because the clutches are swapped simultaneously. It delivers quicker shifts than most manuals, but with the smoothness of an automatic.

A dynamic handling system, called Super-All Wheel Drive (S-AWC), regulates drive torque at each wheel by controlling a network of handling technologies, such as an active center differential 4WD, active yaw control, active stability control and sport ABS. It takes data input from steering wheel, throttle, wheels and the vehicle’s longitudinal and lateral movements to determine the vehicle’s path of travel, and corrects it when needed. Unlike similar systems from Subaru and BMW, S-AWC let’s you push the car harder for longer before pulling you back from the edge. Instead of simply taking control away from the driver at the first hint of trouble, it places control of the car in your hands while still putting power and torque to the wheels that need it. That’s great for people who can actually drive, and for those who aren’t so good.

Mitsu didn’t forget to upgrade the suspension. It provides a more stable ride than the previous model without compromising handling or performance. All Evos sport inverted struts in front and a multi-link configuration in the rear, and are built on a platform that has 56 percent better torsional rigidity and 50 percent better bending rigidity. The MR comes with Bilstein shock absorbers and Eibach springs (rumor has it that Mitsu might also offer this as an option on the GSR, but nothing has been announced officially). Though the GSR setup was tight, it was the MR that really shines in the twisties.

In the looks department, the Evo definitely got a major overhaul. The sophisticated design will appeal to those looking for a less edgy, everyday performance sedan—not just a speed racer. The hood has twin air intakes and a NACA duct to provide plenty of oxygen to the turbocharged engine. The front fascia is also optimized to provide the necessary airflow for the radiator and front-mounted intercooler. Mitsubishi calls it a shark-nosed front end, but it looks a bit Volvo-esque to our eyes. In its new guise, the Evo is sure to appeal to more women and guys who want a speedy ride to take out on the town and still be taken seriously.

When all is said and done, it’s hard to compare the old Evo to the new one. They are two very different vehicles. One is more refined and easier to drive fast. The other has similar driving characteristics, but it is much more freewheeling, more drive-by-the-seat-of-your-pants fun. Regardless, the Evo X is one fabulous car. —Chuck Tannert.
http://www.popularmechanics.com/blog...s/4224695.html
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Old 09-26-2007, 01:53 AM
  #398  
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I want the Ralliart with the twin clutch system for 25k!

but that's not going to happen =(
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Old 09-26-2007, 08:16 AM
  #399  
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$35k for an Evo!
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Old 09-26-2007, 11:04 AM
  #400  
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The evo looks awesome. From some angles though it looks like when a little kid pulls up the tip of their nose (pig nose).
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