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Mercedes-Benz: C-Class News

 
Old 03-05-2018, 11:19 AM
  #1041  
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Still dont like it.... i hated the way the car looks since it was introduced, especially the flat ass rear. after many years, it still looks weird.
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Old 03-05-2018, 12:19 PM
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I like the W205 much more than the W203 & W204. I didn't mind the W202, especially in C36 trim.
Saw a W201 on the road a couple weeks ago, crazy how small that car is.
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Old 03-05-2018, 12:24 PM
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i absolutely love the W205!!
the W204 just looks outdated.....even if a C63 can be had for $17k...
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Old 03-05-2018, 02:00 PM
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Especially the interiors. The W205 is a big step up, IMO, compared to the W204.
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Old 03-05-2018, 02:13 PM
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OoO fancy!! I had never even sat foot in a MB. I'll take your word that the new one's are improved!
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Old 03-06-2018, 01:33 PM
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Love it love it love it.. except for the estate version.
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Old 03-06-2018, 04:04 PM
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Estate > *
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Old 06-20-2018, 09:12 AM
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https://www.caranddriver.com/reviews...t-drive-review

Still the S-class of entry-luxury vehicles.


Its name may be unchanged, but the fresh-faced 2019 Mercedes-Benz C300 packs an all-new powerplant under its hood. The engine is but one slice of the almost 6500 modifications Mercedes claims to have made to the C-class sedan, coupe, and cabriolet as part of the entry-luxury model’s mid-cycle update.

Highs: S-class–level amenities, a technological tour de force, C43 feels blisteringly quick.
Lows: Four-cylinder sounds like a four-cylinder, C43 ride is brutally stiff.


More Power

Despite sharing its displacement with the previous engine, the turbocharged 2.0-liter inline-four in the 2019 C300 is a new design. Armed with technologies such as variable intake-valve lift and a dual-scroll turbocharger, the forced-induction four makes 14 more horses than before, for a total of 255, while torque holds steady at 273 lb-ft.

The previous engine wasn’t known for its inspiring acoustics, and the new one won’t be, either. Although the engine is quiet at idle and subdued at speed, the auditory experience at wide-open throttle remains a bit unbecoming for a vehicle wearing the three-pointed star.

Still, the little four-cylinder is more personable than before. It’s eager to run to redline, builds power progressively throughout the rev range, and, thanks in part to a shorter final-drive ratio (3.27:1 versus 3.07:1), the C300 moves off the line with ease. A nine-speed automatic transmission is the only game in town, but both rear- and all-wheel drive remain available (we drove the former version). The gearbox is both smooth and smart, happy to kick down a couple of gears with a small prod of the accelerator or to motor along in top gear at more than 100 mph on the autobahn. That said, the transmission starts in second gear when placed in the default Comfort mode (there also are Eco, Sport, Sport+, and Individual settings)—an irksome trait that exacerbates the turbocharger’s minor lag.

Those in search of more get up and go can continue to opt for the Mercedes-AMG C43, which comes standard with all-wheel drive. A pair of bigger turbochargers helps the 3.0-liter V-6 produce 23 more horsepower than last year’s car. With 385 horses on tap, the C43 coupe and sedan will get to 60 mph in 4.5 seconds, Mercedes says, with the cabriolet needing 4.6 ticks. We’d wager on even quicker times, as the current C43 coupe and sedan reached 60 in 4.1 seconds in our testing, while the droptop managed it in 4.3. The AMG-tuned nine-speed automatic carries over.

The extra power of the updated engine was greatly appreciated as we barreled along the open roads surrounding Gonnesweiler, Germany. In its element, the C43 remains rewarding to drive as ever. Its balanced chassis, chatty steering, and rear-biased all-wheel-drive system make for an engaging and enjoyable vehicle that almost makes up for the model’s extremely firm ride quality. Although some suspension tweaks were made to the 2019 C43, the car’s adaptive dampers are no more forgiving than before, with the ride ranging from back-aching in Comfort mode to back-breaking in the Sport+ setting.


Screening Room

Thanks to a revised electronics architecture, the 2019 C-class is able to support a number of additional convenience and safety technologies, including a more advanced Distronic active-cruise-control system, that bring it one step closer to achieving parity with its bigger E- and S-class stablemates.

The semi-autonomous driving system relies primarily on a front-mounted camera and radar sensors at the front, sides, and rear of the car. Distronic-equipped C-class models also can use navigation data to automatically adjust their speed for upcoming curves or intersections. While the system was adept at keeping up with the flow of traffic, we found that it often seemed slow to process navigation information. For example, a C300 coupe we drove failed to slow for an upcoming roundabout and needed us to take control of the vehicle to safely decelerate in time.

A new anti-theft alarm can identify any impacts made to the C-class while parked and will send a push notification to the owner’s phone through the Mercedes Me mobile application if it suspects the vehicle has been damaged. It also shares information about any recorded impacts in the gauge-cluster screen when the driver returns.

Analog gauges that incorporate a 5.5-inch info screen are standard on the C300 and C43, while a 12.3-inch digital cluster now is optional. The larger unit pairs with a new 10.3-inch central screen, which replaces the standard 7.0-inch unit. As in the E- and S-classes, the C-class’s two big screens are manipulated by scrolling and tapping at the two touch-sensitive nubs on the left and right spokes of the redesigned steering wheel. Cruise-control functions are on the steering wheel as well, as Mercedes is almost done phasing out its traditional cruise-control stalk. Alternately, drivers can use the console-mounted rotary control knob and associated touchpad (which now includes haptic feedback) to access the infotainment features of the C-class.


The Look

Revised front and rear fascias and new LED head- and taillights give the C-class sedan, coupe, and cabrio a statelier look. Those in search of a sportier design can opt for the AMG Line package, which brings C43-style visuals to the C300.

For its part, the C43’s details include a grille like that of the outgoing C63 AMG (which receives the Panamericana grille design for its 2019 refresh), specific front and rear styling, a quartet of round exhaust outlets, a decklid spoiler, and available lightweight wheels that were wind-tunnel tested for improved aerodynamics—even if the resulting wheel design is anything but beautiful.

Improved powertrains, a new infotainment system, and more sophisticated driver aids should help the 2019 C300 and C43 weather the assault that is coming from the all-new BMW 3-series that’s on the way and keep the C-class near the top of the entry-luxury segment.
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Old 06-21-2018, 09:47 AM
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https://www.motor1.com/news/249801/m...c53-trademark/

Not a big surprise considering there is a gap between the C43 and C63 that needs to be filled.

C43 not powerful enough? C63 too expensive? Mercedes has just the right car for you. A new trademark has emerged from the World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO) suggesting the C-Class range will sooner or later feature a C53 model in the same vein as the bigger E53 and CLS 53 models that were introduced at the beginning of the year in Detroit.

It’s not known at this point how much power the C53 will deliver, but it will obviously be more than the 385 hp offered by the 2019 C43 and less than the 469 hp available in the base C63. Mercedes could decide to use the exact specification of the mild hybrid powertrain inside the aforementioned E53 and CLS 53 where the inline-six 3.0-liter engine and the electric motor work together to provide a combined 429 hp.

As far as torque is concerned, you get 384 pound-feet (520 Newton-meters) in the C43 and 479 lb-ft (650 Nm) in the non-S C63, so the new C53 will have somewhere in that gap. It’s worth mentioning the “53” models have a peak torque of 384 lb-ft (520 Nm) plus the 184 lb-ft (250 Nm) offered by the EQ Boost.

Beyond the powertrain upgrade, the C53 will also get some mild styling tweaks and a different quad exhaust system with the new tailpipes. In hindsight, we should’ve seen this new AMG flavor coming as a spy video from February featured a C-Class Wagon prototype with the round exhaust tips.

Bear in mind that the C53 could effectively replace the C43 taking into account Mercedes-AMG retired the E43 only a couple of years after introducing it to make room for the new version with the higher number. It won’t happen very soon as the 2019MY C-Class just came out, so we might get to see the new AMG flavor at some point in 2019 to serve as a 2020MY.
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Old 06-21-2018, 11:38 AM
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Oh fucking shit.... seriously.... next thing you know BMW is introducing M3.5...... a car between M3 (4 doors) and M4 (2 doors) with fucking 3 doors
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Old 07-25-2018, 09:55 AM
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https://www.caranddriver.com/reviews...t-drive-review

AMG’s mini sledgehammer gets tons more tech and (surprise!) is even better for it.

Ugh. Mercedes should have left well enough alone, we thought to ourselves when we first heard about the updates made to the 2019 Mercedes-AMG C63 and C63 S coupe, cabriolet, and sedan. The list reads like something a technophile would stash under their mattress and includes a larger standard infotainment screen, an available gigantic digital instrument cluster, nine-stage traction-control software, new AMG Dynamics chassis programs, one new driving mode, touch-capacitive nubs on the steering-wheel spokes, and little control nodules on the steering wheel that have their own miniature screens. It’s not often that extra displays or lines of code make a car more appealing to drive, especially one with the raw emotional appeal of the steroidal and brutish C63. Sigh, right?

Highs:
Top-shelf interior, S model’s nine-step AMG traction control is basically magic, sounds and hits like a sledgehammer.

Lows:
Not inexpensive; still rides like a sledgehammer, especially in firmer chassis modes.

It turns out the new model is better than ever.

New Stuff and Stuff

In addition to the tech, which we’ll detail further in a moment, the three U.S.-bound C63 models—there’s also a rad wagon that’s not sold here—get AMG’s retro-handsome Panamericana grille, updated fascias, new exhaust finishers, and restyled LED lights. The car still squats with fat flares over fat rubber, ready to lay waste to a favorite piece of tarmac, but the refreshed exterior—and the grille in particular—imparts greater visual sophistication. Inside, the new displays feature the carmaker’s typical clean, uncluttered, and high-res graphic execution, and they bring a state-of-the-art feel that’s welcome rather than overwhelming.

You need the screens to take full advantage of the plethora of chassis modes, settings, and features anyway. A new rain-and-snow-optimized Slippery driving mode joins Comfort, Sport, Sport+, Individual, and Race (S model only) on the roster of ways to alter the accelerator response, steering weight, adaptive damper firmness, transmission shift behavior, exhaust sound, and stability control settings all at once. You can now activate these with a knob on the lower-right portion of the steering wheel, while a new pair of programmable toggles on the lower left can be used to fiddle with stuff like the individual exhaust, adaptive dampers, stability control, and transmission settings. (The knob and toggle buttons have LCD screens to display the current setting or function.) The center-console controls for these modes remain, but the new switches were added, Mercedes says, to enable easier selection of options on the fly during aggressive driving.

AMG Dynamics is new this year. It’s a piece of software tied to the driving modes that uses steering, speed, and yaw sensors to predict what the car is likely to do, and then help the driver by working the stability control and brake-based torque vectoring. Mercedes says AMG Dynamics makes the C63 more stable in Slippery and Comfort modes, friskier in Sport, friskier still in Sport+, and extra agile with a slight tendency toward oversteer in Race. We came to think of AMG Dynamics as a sort of multistage version of Mazda’s G-Vectoring Control, and the car does indeed feel slightly nimbler, steadier, and more eager to turn in. Also, you should know that the AMG Dynamics modes are called Basic, Advanced, Pro, and Master, and that Mercedes promises “even experienced drivers receive optimum assistance without being patronized by the system.” We didn’t feel patronized, which means that it was probably working.

AMG Traction Control: Basically Magic

The single best new thing, however, is the nine-step AMG Traction Control. The C63 is the second AMG to get the tech after it made its debut on the GT R supercar two years ago. Its existence isn’t obvious, but activating it is dead simple. Simply switch off the stability control with the center-console button or the steering-wheel toggle, at which point the chassis-mode knob’s screen changes to display your setting number and a segmented green, yellow, and red dial. In a nutshell, the system controls how much torque is sent to the rear tires in order to deliver optimum grip—and prevent time-sapping wheelspin or oversteer—when getting back on the throttle in a given corner.

We found the system to be highly effective in the GT R we ran at Lightning Lap 2017, where that car came very close to setting a new overall record, and our regard remains high after driving C63 coupes and sedans at the wicked and challenging Bilster Berg track in Bad Driburg, Germany. It’s an intelligent tool for learning the car, your own limits, and/or a particular racetrack in a metered way. Having a safety net that can be progressively scaled back makes particular sense in a model that serves as an entry point into AMG’s wild ’n’ wooly lineup. It makes any fool feel like a hero as they exploit and slide the C63; the car is easy to move around and gather up as it is, but any tail-out action the system determines as going too far is dealt with quickly and imperceptibly. In short, you want AMG Traction Control. Which means you also want the C63 S model, since it’s standard there and not available in the basic C63. Our only gripes are that 1) it’s somewhat counterintuitive that intervention is dialed down as you move up through the numbers, and 2) we don’t have AMG Traction Control in everything we drive.

Also cool: the new Track Pace option for the main screen that displays racetrack maps and records lap and sector times; it also can use the head-up display to show helpful items such as upcoming corners, braking points, and cornering-speed references. Several famous circuits are preloaded, but the system will also use GPS to learn new ones. AMG has made it about as simple as possible to get up to pace at the track.

The Rest of the Thing

Retuned adaptive dampers offer a wider range of adjustment across the driving modes. That said, while Comfort mode did feel a wee bit suppler, ride quality still falls on the granitic side. You’re going to want to vote for that road-repair millage—or get a punch card from your back specialist—before handing a check over to the dealer. That check will be a bit more than last year’s, with the sedan and coupe starting in the mid-to-high $60,000s and the cabriolet at roughly $75K. Add $7000 or so for the more powerful S versions, which have not only the exclusive Race mode and AMG Traction Control but also many of the base model’s options as standard.

The engine is one of the few major components that didn’t get an overhaul. Good. The C63 packs a twin-turbocharged 4.0-liter V-8 in 469-hp (base) and 503-hp (S model) strengths, and it’s a potent, sweet-spinning thing that hits like a sledgehammer. The power delivery is immediate and mighty, and stomps on the gas pedal send the car hurtling forward like Mjölnir making its way back to Thor’s hand. And the sound is as intoxicating as ever—at least in this turbocharged generation—all thunder and fury in the exhaust’s most aggressive setting.

As before, the V-8’s fusillade is sent to the rear wheels via a Mercedes Speedshift automatic transmission. That means there’s a multiplate clutch used in place of a torque converter, which makes it more responsive to acceleration requests, but it now has nine forward ratios instead of the previous seven. The additional ratios don’t make much of a difference in driving, but the new ’box now can skip more ratios in one go rather than shuffling along gears. It’s also said to shift even more quickly; the seven-speed shifted plenty quick before, and the new nine-speed shifts plenty quick now.

For all its might and muscle and added agility, and provided you have smooth roads, the C63 is still a good long-distance hauler. It’s incredibly stable at triple-digit autobahn speeds, the optional Performance seats—which now offer ventilation—are supportive and comfortable, and the cockpit is luxurious enough that you can forget you’re in such a potent and complicated machine. We were big fans of the outgoing version, but the new driver-focused tech makes the C63 and C63 S more approachable and even more capable. We’re happy Mercedes and AMG didn’t leave well enough alone.
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Old 07-25-2018, 09:55 AM
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Old 02-12-2019, 09:13 AM
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https://www.motortrend.com/cars/merc...t-test-review/

We have long praised the Mercedes C-Class for having one of the most luxurious interiors in its class, but a stiff ride prevented it from joining the very top players in its segment. Newly refreshed for 2019, we tested the C 300 again to see how it has changed.

Although the previous version never felt underpowered, Mercedes equips the 2.0-liter turbo-four with 14 extra horses this year. The C 300 now makes 255 hp, and torque holds steady at 273 lb-ft. Peak horsepower arrives later from 5,800-6,100 rpm instead of 5,500 rpm, while peak torque is now at 1,800-4,000 rpm instead of 1,300-4,000 rpm.

The extra horsepower contributes to a noticeable improvement in acceleration from 0—60 mph. We clocked the C 300 hitting 60 mph in 5.5 seconds, making it half a second quicker than a 2017C-Class we tested. A 2017 BMW 330i also hit the mark in 5.5 seconds, although we have yet to test the completely redesigned 2019 model. Our Mercedes tester was quicker than a 2017 Lexus IS 200t F Sport (7.0 seconds, and since renamed the IS 300) and a 2019 Genesis G70 2.0T (7.4 seconds). But it was slower than a 2017 Audi A4 2.0T Quattro (5.2 seconds).

The quick throttle response makes the C 300 feel sprightly off the line. Unlike some luxury cars, the driving mode you select makes a difference. When accelerating from a stop, you'll notice the sharp throttle response of Sport+ mode as your head gets sucked into the headrest, and the suspension is noticeably sharper. Like the previous model, the ride is firm for a luxury cruiser, even in Comfort mode. Still, the refreshed C-Class doesn't conjure up the same feelings of brittleness as the old version.

The updated 2019 Mercedes C 300 also made progress in the quarter-mile, with a time of 14.1 seconds at 99.9 mph, compared to 14.5 seconds at 96.1 mph with the old Benz. The new number is up there with the BMW (14.2 at 98.5) and Audi (14.0 at 98.2). And it's markedly better than the Genesis (15.7 at 91.7 mph) and Lexus (15.4 at 89.9).

But the Benz underperformed in the figure eight, at least compared to rivals. It completed the task in 27.7 seconds at an average 0.63 g. In comparison, the BMW rounded the bends in 26.1 seconds at 0.71 g, while the Lexus performed similarly at 26.3 seconds at 0.69 g. Genesis creamed the competition with a time of 25.6 seconds at 0.69 g, while the Audi managed 26.3 seconds at 0.69 g. Even the pre-refresh C 300 performed better than the new version with a time of 25.7 seconds at 0.71 g. Although road test editor Chris Walton liked the engine and transmission, he called the non-defeatable stability control an "exercise in frustration." Worth noting—the 2017 model we tested was a sport-trimmed car with a more aggressive wheel and tire package.

Although an adept sprinter and runner, the C 300 could benefit from a few yoga classes. Steering doesn't feel particularly nimble at low to moderate speeds. You have to turn the steering wheel a bit more than desired to achieve a targeted movement, although the wheel can feel heavy as if to give the impression of sportiness. That said, this car's small size permits easy three-point turns.

The Benz impressed in our Real MPG test. We recorded 24.5/40.3 mpg city/highway, up from the EPA rating of 23/34 mpg. By every measure, that's ahead of our Real MPG numbers for the Audi (22.1/35.2 mpg) and Lexus (20.4/31.1 mpg). Its highway and combined numbers are also higher than the BMW (24.7/33.9 mpg) and Genesis (25.1/34.5 mpg), although lagging slightly behind in the city.

One thing hasn't changed: The C 300's interior is still the best part of the vehicle. And it's slightly more posh than before since it features a new optional 10.3-inch center display that improves upon the old smaller screen. That said, it's too bad the refreshed C-Class doesn't have the new MBUX infotainment that's standard on the much less expensive A-Class. That infotainment setup gets a new speech interface that can learn via artificial intelligence, as well as touch controls on the screen and center console. Instead of a touchscreen, the C-Class' infotainment system responds to inputs via a rotary knob.

And unlike the A-Class that makes the instrument cluster and infotainment system look like one large display, the C-Class' gauge cluster is separate from the main central screen. But at least the fully digital 12.3-inch instrument optional display looks sharp and has easy-to-use thumb pad controls for scrolling through the menus. Meanwhile, the center display benefits from crisp graphics, and the rear camera provides an exceptionally clear view of the surroundings, day or night.

If you're wondering what features are standard on the C 300, highlights include dual-zone climate control, rain-sensing wipers, a five-speaker audio system, Apple CarPlay and Android Auto, LED headlights and taillights, and automatic emergency braking. Many stand-out goodies are optional, including 64-color ambient interior lighting, a head-up display, a Burmester surround sound system, and a driver assistance package with evasive steering assist, active lane change assist, lane keeping assist, and steering and distance assist. In all, our model rang out to $58,905, well above the $42,395 starting price. For the premium price, you receive an improved car: a powerful, fuel-efficient sedan with one of the most luxurious interiors in its class.



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Old 02-12-2019, 10:58 AM
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The paint color is nice but those wheels are appalling. They look like something off a Corolla.
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Old 02-12-2019, 11:04 AM
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Based on the article, I'm assuming these are not the Sport/AMG pkg wheels. A lot of the base W205 wheels leave a lot to be desired. Not sure if their tester had the Airmatic, though they do mention suspension when changing the 'Agility' settings.

I can agree with the article though. I love the go-kart-like handling, but the suspension can be stiff at times on some lesser maintained roads.
I've also had it tripod going up a steep driveway at an angle.
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Old 02-12-2019, 11:47 AM
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I like this version of dual LCD screen much better than rest of their dual iPad setup which looks very odd to me.
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Old 02-12-2019, 01:14 PM
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Hey, channel 53 Chill on Sirius XM... good stuff, I listen to that a lot.
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Old 05-13-2019, 10:14 AM
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https://www.motor1.com/news/349201/c...ion-might-end/

The need for more GLE and GLS production capacity could put an end to the U.S.-built C-Class Sedan.

A new report published by Automotive News indicates the days of the U.S.-built Mercedes C-Class could be numbered. As it stands, the Alabama factory where the premium sedan is built is working at a 93-percent capacity, but it needs extra output to meet a projected increase in demand for the new GLE and GLS SUVs. With a new GLE Coupe on the horizon, the three-pointed star expects sales of the SUV-coupe to increase as well in the coming years.


The rise of SUVs could effectively kick the U.S.-made C-Class Sedan out of America as Mercedes is expected to prioritize production of higher-volume models like the GLE and GLS. Sales of the midsize SUV are estimated to increase by 28 percent over the next four years while those of the fullsize SUV are forecasted to jump by as much as 30 percent during the same interval.

Automotive News has contacted Mercedes-Benz USA CEO Dietmar Exler as well as Daimler's soon-to-be chairman, Ola Källenius, but both declined to confirm the rumor. However, Källenius – who will be replacing Dieter Zetsche later this month – did say SUVsare “the perfect vehicle for the United States,” adding “Americans like their space” as well as the “convenience of SUVs.”


The sales decline of the C-Class Sedan in the United States is obvious – from the 81,886 units delivered in 2015 to only 46,986 cars in 2018. During this period of time, the sedan’s production share at the Alabama factory plunged from 31 to only 20 percent. For this year, LMC Automotive estimates demand will decrease furthermore, to 43,240, which in turn would lower the production share to 19 percent.

Should the Alabama factory lose production of the C-Class Sedan, the report mentions South Africa might be tasked to take over production at the plant in East London where the model is already assembled in both left- and right-hand-drive configurations. Data released by LMC Automotive indicates the manufacturing facility has 25 percent production capacity available, so there would be room to handle the extra load.

If the U.S.-built C-Class Sedan will be no more, it could happen at the end of the current generation’s life cycle. The W205 is expected to bow out around 2021 when Mercedes will introduce a new C-Class W206, which we’ve spied undergoing testing on numerous occasions already.

Aside from the Alabama and East London factories, the C-Class is also assembled in Bremen, Germany as well as in Beijing where it’s built alongside a long-wheelbase version sold exclusively in China.
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Old 05-13-2019, 03:05 PM
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I'm very surprised... I see a ton of C300s out there. Way more than GLEs and GLSs.
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Old 05-13-2019, 03:10 PM
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Lot's of GLA/GLC around here. A few ML/GLE, and the rare GL/GLS.

I see many C & quite a few E.
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