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Mazda: Development and Technology News

 
Old 07-10-2019, 12:50 PM
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A fun to drive Toyota SUV
Next-gen CX-9 maybe, share with the Highlander?
Or a Toyota badged CX-5, to slot between the Highlander & Rav4?

Wonder if Mazda has plans to extend the future RWD I6 sedan into an SUV
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Old 07-10-2019, 12:57 PM
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I'm personally allergic to SUVs, but want Mazda to succeed (or to continue succeeding) ... and would seriously consider buying a RWD I6 sedan if they made one.
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Old 07-10-2019, 12:59 PM
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You mean when they build one? But, if, they sell it in the US, since the best always seems to stay in EU/Asia
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Old 07-10-2019, 01:23 PM
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Yes, exactly.

Although I imagine that the larger engine displacement of an I6 would make any RWD sedan a logical candidate for the N. Am. market, no?
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Old 07-10-2019, 02:22 PM
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One can hope.
Considering EU/JPN get different (smaller) engines than we do, I'd think the upcoming RWD sedan would be ideal for the US market.
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Old 07-10-2019, 02:23 PM
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Old 07-11-2019, 09:15 AM
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https://www.freep.com/story/money/ca...ll/1691547001/

Mazda is recalling more than 262,000 SUVs and cars in the U.S. to fix a software problem that could cause the engines to stall unexpectedly.

The recall covers certain Mazda6 midsize sedans and CX-5 SUVs from the 2018 and 2019 model years. Also included are Mazda3 small cars from 2019.

Mazda traced the problem to a software error in the computer that controls the valves as part of the vehicles' fuel-saving cylinder deactivation technology.

The company says in government documents posted Wednesday that drivers won't get any warning before the engine stalls.

Mazda says no crashes or injuries have been reported because of the problem.

Dealers will reprogram the software at no cost to owners. The recall is expected to start before Aug. 26.
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Old 07-15-2019, 12:53 PM
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https://www.motor1.com/news/359893/m...ore-expensive/

Added complexity doesn’t translate to added costs.



Customers worried Mazda’s new SkyActiv-X engine would cost more to repair should breathe a sigh of relief. In an interview with Cars Guide, Eiji Nakai, Mazda’s powertrain manager, said the new engine wouldn’t require more servicing nor cost more to repair when compared to a traditional gasoline engine. According to Nakai, Mazda worked to ensure its SkyActiv-X engine would operate as a conventional engine.



Mazda’s new 2.0-liter four-cylinder SkyActiv-X engine combines spark-controlled ignition used in most gasoline-fueled vehicles and compression ignition found in diesel engines to improve efficiency and power. However, combining the two technologies has increased engine complexity. The new ignition process is intricate with Mazda adding pressure sensors to each cylinder to send data to the engine computer. When we drove a prototype version of the engine in early 2018, Mazda research and development engineer Jay Chen said: “Only now are our engine control processors fast enough to control this event by event by event.”

The new ignition process, which Mazda calls Spark Controlled Compression Ignition (SPCCI), puts more strain on the engine internals than your standard gasoline engine, so Mazda beefed up their strength. As a result, the SkyActiv-X shares no parts with Mazda’s SkyActiv-G engine. Engineers during the drive event also noted the engine did cost more to build, too.

However, the tradeoff is more power and increased efficiency. According to Mazda, the powerplant produces 177 horsepower (132 kilowatts) and 165 pound-feet (224 Newton-meters) of torque. In Europe, the mill is rated to return roughly 44 miles per gallon, but if the engine were ever to make it to the U.S., expect a different rating as the American EPA evaluation is quite different. Mazda says the new engine could improve fuel efficiency by 20-30 percent.

It appears much of the engine’s complexity comes not from the hardware, but from the software and sensors needed to keep the ignition controlled. New technologies often worry consumers and for good reasons. Reliability and service and repair costs are important factors to consider when buying a new car, and unproven tech can throw a substantial financial wrench into the ownership experience. Mazda’s SkyActiv-X engine shouldn’t be cause for worry.
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