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Mazda: CX-30 News

 
Old 03-05-2019, 08:27 AM
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Mazda: CX-30 News

https://www.carscoops.com/2019/03/al...s-enough-suvs/

In the rare instance that you find Mazda’s CX-3 a touch too small, and at the same time, the CX-5 a little too big, the Japanese carmaker has come up with a solution that hears to the name CX-30.

Sales for the CX-30, unveiled just now in Geneva, will commence in the middle of this year in Europe, followed by the rest of the world at some point in time. As far as styling is concerned, the CX-30 has been thought up using Mazda’s Kodo design language, resulting in a dynamic exterior.

“We designed the CX-30 to be an essential partner in the customer’s daily life,” said Mazda president & CEO, Akira Marumoto. “It will be made at key global plants so we can deliver Mazda’s renowned driving pleasure and matured Kodo design to customers all over the world. Moving forward, our new products and technologies will ensure customers continue to see the value in owning a Mazda car. We aim to be recognised as a brand that forms the strongest of bonds with each customer.”

Inside, it features “relaxed and user-friendly packaging”, with enough room for four adults. Meanwhile, the increased height over a regular saloon or hatchback means improved visibility on the road, as well as easier access inside, as with most crossovers. As for the freestanding infotainment system, it can be controlled via a rotary dial on the center console.

Power comes from the automaker’s latest-generation Skyactive engines, including the Skyactiv-X. While no official word has been dropped, we expect the CX-30 to utilize the same hardware as the latest Mazda3, which should mean 1.5-, 2.0 and 2.5-liter petrol units, as well as a 1.8-liter diesel for Europe. An optional all-wheel drive system should also be available.

Compared to a Mazda3, the CX-30 has an extra 25 mm (0.98 inches) in ground clearance, plus an impressive 430 liters (15.1 cu.ft) of volume inside the trunk, compared to the 3’s 295 liters (10.4 cu.ft).

While there’s no word yet on pricing, Mazda will probably charge you a little less than they would for a CX-5, which means that in the U.S. for example, the CX-30 could set you back anywhere between $24,350 (entry-level CX-5) and $20,390 (entry-level CX-3).
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Old 03-05-2019, 08:27 AM
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Old 03-05-2019, 08:34 AM
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https://www.motor1.com/news/308037/m...veiled-geneva/

It will slot between the CX-3 and CX-5.

When Mazda released the first teaser image of a new compact crossover exactly a month ago, we thought the Japanese company is going to introduce a new generation CX-3 in Geneva. Fast forward to present day, the brand is unveiling its new model near Lake Geneva – and it is neither а new CX-3, nor a European version of the CX-4.

Instead, Mazda is debuting a brand new global crossover. The CX-30 is a production high-riding vehicle positioned between the CX-3 and CX-5 in the marque’s crossover/SUV lineup. It features somewhat more restrained looks than its CX brothers with a more conservative approach to the Kodo design language. The proportions are balanced and the machine appears to be slightly less aggressive than the CX-5 but, dare we say, that’s for good.

The CX-30 rides on an evolution of Mazda’s Skyactiv-Vehicle Architecture which is shared with the new Mazda3. It is 173 inches (4,395 mm) long, 71 inches (1,795 wide), and has a wheelbase of 105 inches (2,655 mm), which makes it significantly longer and slightly wider than the CX-3. Mazda is not saying what’s the vehicle’s weight but we suppose it’s going to be a bit higher than the CX-3’s 2,952 pounds (1,339 kilograms).

The engine range of the model consists of Euro 6d-TEMP gas and diesel engines mated to either a six-speed manual or a six-speed automatic gearbox. All gasoline units come with Mazda’s M Hybrid mild-hybrid system for improved efficiency. The tech combines an ICE with an electric motor and a 24-volt lithium-ion battery.

The CX-30 is also receiving Mazda’s latest Skyactiv-X engine which uses a unique combustion method that, on paper, combines the advantages of a gasoline and a diesel engine. The manufacturer is not disclosing performance numbers for the unit, but if the new Mazda3 for Europe is anything to go by, you should expect the peak output to be about 178 horsepower (133 kilowatts) and 164 pound-feet (222 Newton-meters) of torque.

Power from the internal combustion engine is channeled to all four wheels through the company’s i-Activ AWD system with GVC Plus which intuitively controls the torque distribution between the front and rear wheels. Mazda says it delivers better grip under all driving conditions without affecting the fuel efficiency.

The "second new generation model" from Mazda is slated to arrive at U.S. showrooms at some point in the near future.
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Old 03-05-2019, 08:47 AM
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Functionally and aesthetically, this might be a better choice than the 3 hatch.
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Old 03-05-2019, 09:16 AM
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A bit too much black cladding (would prefer it be slimmer) but otherwise, it looks pretty good.
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Old 03-05-2019, 10:06 AM
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In a break from Mazda's established, odd-numbered vehicle-naming hierarchy, the company's latest compact crossover will carry the CX-30 moniker, and possibly signals future tweaks to Mazda's naming convention.

While our initial speculation that the vehicle would be badged CX-4 was a bit off, the 2020 CX-30 itself is exactly what we expected it to be: a compact SUV based on the new Mazda 3 that will slot between the current subcompact CX-3 and the 10Best-winning CX-5 crossovers. Unveiled at the Geneva auto show, the CX-30 is 173.0 inches long and rides on a 104.5-inch wheelbase, placing it squarely between its two siblings. Mazda's latest SkyActiv vehicle architecture, which debuted with the 2019 Mazda 3 compact sedan and hatch, underpins the CX-30. As with the 3, front-wheel drive will be standard with all-wheel drive an option, and the suspension consists of the same strut-front/rear-torsion-beam layout.

MazdaAlso expect the CX-30 to employ similar powertrain strategy as the 3, which likely will mean a 186-hp, naturally-aspirated 2.0-liter inline-four mated to a six-speed automatic transmission as the standard setup. Mazda's high-tech spark-controlled-compression-ignition 2.0-liter inline-four, dubbed Skyactiv-X, will likely be optional after the CX-30 goes on sale in the U.S. early next year as a 2020 model; the vehicle and the Skyactiv-X engine both will initially launch in Europe later this year.

Tidier proportions and a faster rear-hatch profile will distinguish the CX-30 from the larger CX-5, as will thicker dark plastic cladding on the lower body and wheel arches. It's not a bad look but the cladding is prominent and somewhat distracts from an otherwise sleekly sculpted crossover design.

MazdaInside, expect the environment and equipment levels to mimic the new Mazda 3's cockpit, which is very good thing. Along with the considerable attention Mazda says it paid to the CX-30's level of sound insulation, the SUV sports the 3's new front-seat design, as well as an updated eight-speaker audio system with an available 12-speaker setup. Also available will be Mazda's i-Activsense suite of driver aids, including adaptive cruise control, lane departure warning, automatic forward emergency braking with pedestrian detection, and auto high beams. Although the CX-30's cabin is slightly more accommodating in terms of passenger space than the Mazda 3 hatchback, its 15-cubic-foot cargo capacity behind the rear seats is less than half of what the CX-5 offers, albeit is slightly more generous than the tiny CX-3's 12 cubic feet.

Despite the latest Mazda 3's slightly slower steering and switch to a less advanced torsion-beam rear axle, the CX-30 shares a lot of DNA with what we consider to be a family of excellent driving vehicles. We'll have the opportunity later this year to see how well the 3's bones fare in crossover duty, as well as if the CX-30 is as significant of a break from Mazda's established SUVs as its name suggests.

https://www.caranddriver.com/news/a2...v-photos-info/
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Old 03-05-2019, 10:17 AM
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Originally Posted by 00TL-P3.2 View Post
A bit too much black cladding (would prefer it be slimmer) but otherwise, it looks pretty good.
Now that you mention it, this bothers me like crazy. Looks great otherwise.

Just on the wheel arches is okay, otherwise it starts looking cheap especially when they're so thicc like that.
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Old 03-05-2019, 10:33 AM
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Tone the cladding down to about 45% of what's there & it'd be just right, IMO.
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Old 03-05-2019, 11:34 AM
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I don’t know why they would call this the CX-30 unless an entire rebranding is coming for all their SUVs.

Way too much black cladding and the engine combination we are likely to get makes this a non-starter. 2.0L NA engine? Really?
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Old 03-05-2019, 12:07 PM
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Originally Posted by charliemike View Post
I don’t know why they would call this the CX-30 unless an entire rebranding is coming for all their SUVs.

Way too much black cladding and the engine combination we are likely to get makes this a non-starter. 2.0L NA engine? Really?
Need to distinguish it from CX-5 somehow.

Biker, who sees this as killing off the CX-3 in the US.
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Old 03-05-2019, 02:42 PM
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How about... CX-4?

It's like Ford naming the Ranger the F-15
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Old 03-05-2019, 02:48 PM
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CX-4 already exists in other markets, like a CX-5 Coupe.

CX-3 is Mazda2/Demio based, the CX-30 is Mazda3 based.
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Old 03-05-2019, 05:12 PM
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I will have a hard time telling between this and a CX-3 haha.
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Old 03-07-2019, 11:59 AM
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https://www.caranddriver.com/news/a2...da-cx-30-name/

What's in a name? Mazda's CX-30 designation for its new compact crossover is perplexing. For one thing, given its placement between the smaller CX-3 and the larger CX-5 in Mazda's lineup, it logically should be called the CX-4. But also because its four-character alphanumeric badge is out of sync with all of the company's other three-digit nameplates in the U.S. market. We learned from Mazda that, using its internal reasoning, it had little option but to create an all-new moniker for the vehicle, logical or not.

C/D pulled Mazda's U.S. representatives aside at the Geneva auto show for an explanation. It simply came down to the fact that Mazda already sells a distinct model in China badged as CX-4, and the company could not justify selling two separate vehicles under the same name in different markets. Compared with the potential confusion that some buyers may have in differentiating the CX-30 from the current CX-3, not to mention the additional marketing complexity that the two similar badges create, the corporate frustration that two CX-4 models might cause seems, to us, like a small price to pay. But we're not automotive executives, only humble scribes.

So, where did the CX-30 name come from? Thank the company's BT-50 mid-size pickup truck, which is sold in Australia and other foreign markets. With its four-character alphanumeric precedent already in place, it was a short stretch—albeit a somewhat clumsy one—for Mazda to essentially adapt a CX prefix and tack on a couple of numbers.

While that doesn't resolve the similarity between the CX-30 and CX-3 designations, the new nameplate's unique back story does soften our initial speculation that the CX-30 might foreshadow the future addition of other four-digit Mazda CX models. That's not to say such a development may not happen down the road. But at least Mazda didn't embark on the wholesale restructuring of its model designations just for the CX-30's sake, which surely would result in even greater confusion. Just ask Infiniti.
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Old 07-15-2019, 08:45 AM
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https://www.topgear.com/car-reviews/mazda/cx-30

Mazda thinks there’s too much of a gap between its excellent but now quite old CX-3, and the also excellent and slightly newer CX-5. So it’s done a car to plug it – not the CX-4, because there’s already one of those, sold exclusively in China – but the CX-30, a Mazda3 based crossover aimed squarely at young families. Apparently.

At 4,395mm long and 1,540mm tall, the CX-30 is around 7cm shorter and 10cm taller than the hatchback on which it’s based. Shorter because Mazda thinks this makes it easier to manoeuvre around town, which is where all of these things will live, and taller because, well, crossover. If the CX-5 competes with the Qashqai, Tiguan, Kuga and so-on, the CX-30’s rivals must be cars like the Volkswagen T-Roc, and possibly the Honda HR-V or Toyota C-HR. Hyphen-rich class, this.

Mazda reckons the CX-30, which is only the second car in the company’s “next-generation” line-up, could become its best-selling car in Europe – ahead of the 2 and 3 hatchbacks, 6 saloon/estate and CX-3 and CX-5 crossovers. Such is our apparent love for pseudo-SUVs.

As it’s based on the 3, the CX-30 uses the same engines (including the new ‘Spark-Controlled Compression Ignition’ petrol) and gearboxes, and has a very similar interior. Looks similar too, though different enough from the standard hatchback to make it a worthwhile item.

It’s a good-looking thing, the CX-30. Not quite as crisp as the 3, but not too far off. Among the better-looking cars in its class, certainly, even if the plastic cladding along the sills and over the wheel arches looks a bit heavy-handed from some angles.

The CX-30 gets the exact same engines as the Mazda3 hatchback – meaning you have the choice of a 2.0-litre naturally-aspirated four-cylinder petrol (Mazda continues to buck the ‘downsizing’ trend, favouring larger N/A engines over smaller turbocharged ones) with mild-hybrid tech’ and a 1.8-litre four-cylinder diesel. Or, happily, the fantastically clever petrol ‘Skyactiv-X’ engine.

Also of 2.0-litres and four-cylinders, it claims to offer the efficiency and low-down grunt of a diesel with the high-revving character and feel of a petrol. Something made possible, says Mazda, by a system called ‘Spark-Controlled Compression Ignition’. We had to wait for this engine in the Mazda3, but in the CX-30 it will be available from launch at the end of 2019. We haven’t tried it in the CX-30, but you can read about what it feels like in a Mazda3 (and exactly how it works) by clicking right here.

Both of the CX-30’s conventional engines are nice enough. We tried two – a diesel with the six-speed automatic gearbox (a combination that may not be offered in the UK, as Mazda believes so few people would choose it) and the petrol with the six-speed manual. Both were front-wheel drive, though all-wheel drive will also be offered (even then, don’t expect the CX-30 to get very far off-road. That’s not what it’s for).

Mazda’s manual gearboxes are usually among the best fitted to mainstream cars (Honda’s are notably brilliant, too), and the CX-30’s is no different. The automatic is of the old-school, torque-converter variety and… it isn’t great. Likely to cost a fair chunk more than the manual, and it can be a bit clunky and indecisive. Double-clutch transmissions offered by other manufacturers are way ahead, even though many seem to have been somewhat compromised by WLTP economy and emissions testing procedures.

As for engines, you might want to wait for the Skyactiv-X. The other two are good enough – but the extra power, torque and economy set to be offered by the new engine make it hard to ignore, even if it is set to be more expensive than the conventional petrol.

The CX-30 handles pretty well – something that should come as no surprise, given it’s based on a car than was rather good to drive to begin with, and that it’s not actually much heavier despite its crossover-y-ness. Steers, brakes and corners in the same smooth, fluid fashion. Ride is broadly ok – it’s well damped, but there’s an initial firmness that could introduce some patter on poorly-surfaced British roads.

It’s more or less the same as the Mazda3 in here, which is fine by us. The dashboard is as simple as they come, with easy-to-use climate controls separated from the infotainment screen, which can only be operated with a clickwheel on the centre-tunnel (note – Mazda says there’s as much space between the front seats as there is in the bigger CX-5).

The UI is superb – looks smart and is devoid of any unnecessary complication, something German systems tend to specialise in. Conventional dials, too. Well, the speedometer is technically a screen, but it still looks like a conventional dial and is flanked by two others. Very clear, very easy to use. Very Mazda.

The front seats are superb, though the bases could be longer to better support the thighs of taller drivers, and the driving position is particularly good, with loads of adjustment in the steering wheel (you can pull it right the way out of the dashboard). Things are less good in the back. The Mazda3 isn’t especially spacious, and remember the CX-30 is yet shorter.

Headroom is ok and more glass means it’s brighter back there than the hatch, but taller adults may struggle for legroom. You can at least slide your feet under the front seats (getting them out again is a bit awkward, mind), but if you’re 6ft or even a few inches shy, your knees will be rammed right up against the backrest of the seat ahead of you.

The boot isn’t bad at 430-litres, but the loadbay itself isn’t as clever as some rivals. No tie-downs, cubbies or split-level floors in the cars we tested.

Mazda hasn’t announced pricing or trims for the CX-30 yet. It’ll do that nearer the car’s launch at the end of this year. It’ll no doubt cost more than the Mazda3 hatchback, though, meaning things ought to start in the mid-twenties and rise quickly into the thirties for a car with the clever Skyactiv-X motor and all-wheel drive.

Should be reasonable to run, though. Mazdas are known for their reliability, and the engines range from pretty to very efficient. Automatic gearboxes, all-wheel drive and large alloy wheels all have negative effects on the numbers though. At best you’re looking at 135g/km of CO2 and 55.4mpg. That’s for a diesel manual with FWD - no figures yet for the Skyactiv-X.

Mazdas are usually pretty well kitted-out, too. The company doesn’t really do optional extras, either, making the business of spec’ing your car pretty easy. Various active safety features including lane-departure warning and blind-spot monitoring ought to be standard-fit.

Good car, the Mazda CX-30. Handles well, looks smart and has a lovely interior. But as is always the case with crossovers – the conventional car on which it’s based (in this case the Mazda3 hatchback) is the sensible buy. It handles better, is more economical, just as practical, faster and, though prices for the CX-30 haven’t yet been announced, will no doubt be cheaper.

But since when has any of that logic stopped people from flocking to crossovers? Either way – as long as you avoid the automatic transmission and don’t often need to carry tall adults in the back, the CX-30 is a worthwhile alternative to anything else you might be considering.
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